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2

What about nnn? The screenshot on the Github page already shows folder sizes, and the description tells: nnn is also a du analyzer.


0

Try micro, a versatile text editor with no dependencies, (IOW a fully static binary). Features Easy to Use Micro's number one feature is being easy to install (it's just a static binary with no dependencies) and easy to use. Highly Customizable Use a simple json format to configure your options and rebind keys to your liking. ...


3

GNOME can do basic left-right tiling and more. Go to settings in the upper-right corner. Search for keyboard shortcuts, and scroll all the way down. Assign hotkeys to View split on left and View split on right. So I noticed recently that Joe's Window Manager, and Openbox in LXDE (Fedora's default LXDE setup), can also tile windows. Edit the config files and ...


1

avidemux can do this. It's in rpmfusion free for Fedora and there's a PPA for Ubuntu. It supports most codecs and containers, and can step forward/back frame by frame, and properly switch between forward/back without needing to skip. It will also seek in containers that normally don't support it, like MPEG-TS. It's able to do this by building an index ...


3

Lazygit Lazygit (written in Go using the gocui library) fits all my needs. It’s simple, intuitive for user that doesn’t know Vim or Emacs and it gets the job done. Notable features: adding files easily - a staging files one by one (space) or en masse (a) committing files (c) and signing commits using PGP resolving merge conflicts (interactively) - m ...


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Expanding on @BeloumiX's answer: GNU Nano (named after the non-free editor it imitated, pico) is a simple curses-based text editor. Working with it is based on various (not so many) keyboard shortcuts, like Ctrl+O for writing the file, Ctrl+W for searching and Ctrl+X for quitting. It takes up the whole terminal, and has a small "menu" at the bottom ...


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Try nano. This editor is written in C, so it should have not much dependencies, and is much easier to use than vi.


1

Emacs with lsp-mode (https://github.com/emacs-lsp/lsp-mode) and flycheck (https://www.flycheck.org) will be a good choice to target multiple languages simultaneously. According to lsp-mode supported languages table: fortran, c++, python, R and Julia are already supported


0

I found a tool that might help: https://github.com/xaaronc/injectevents You can: record input replay input recorded input will always be saved in a file. You might: Be able to edit the files. (I couldn't work it out, the encoding seems off, but it should be an easy fork) You can't: Start and stop with an application internal hotkey Repeatedly play ...


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