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Focus stacking online is a web application which can focus stack images without a license fee. All it requires is a browser access. I tested it with a smartphone and a mac os. Worked well.


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To open a PDF in LibreOffice Writer, you need to choose "PDF - Portable Document Format (Writer)" in the File Open dialog: Then you can save it in whatever format you wish (to odt, to doc, to docx).


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I recommend Molimentum Quick (disclaimer: I'm the founder). It's available for Windows and Ubuntu. IT'S FREE! You can insert code snippets with ease with some shortcuts (check out the "smart insert" feature in docs). You can then click a shortcut, search, and it's copied to the clipboard. It supports syntax highlighting and because of the versatile design, ...


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At this time, there is the Bookmarks Commander github repo here for Mozilla Firefox for Google Chrome


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Try micro, a versatile text editor with no dependencies, (IOW a fully static binary). Features Easy to Use Micro's number one feature is being easy to install (it's just a static binary with no dependencies) and easy to use. Highly Customizable Use a simple json format to configure your options and rebind keys to your liking. ...


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Check out pfftk. It is command line and works well. You can also look into pdf creator, a free pdf printer that allows you to create pdf files from any input including html+css.


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Here are some links that might help: Skype on Windows Skype on PC or Mac You might also try dragging & dropping the small image of your own video feed into the center of the call screen, which should trigger a side-by-side view of both video feeds (yours & the other participant) at an equal size. Reference Link


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ConEmu might fit the bill. It claims to support both WinAPI console programs as well as Unix-style pty programs - which should include the Cygwin shell. Screenshot: It has some capability of differentiating the console windows from each other: Tab titles can be set arbitrarily. A tab can get a background logo set. Terminal colors can be set to one of ...


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A convenient option on Windows is to install a free PDF printer driver. Then fire up Word or any other application that will open up a document and choose Print from the File menu or press Ctrl-p. Choose PDF as the printer and the location where the PDF will save to. It is difficult recommend any particular one since it's been a long time. These days, it ...


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PyVista (a Python vtk wrapper with sugar syntax) seems to be the best option so far. It reads several formats (stl, obj, vtk, etc). There are examples of generating mp4 and even gif


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avidemux can do this. It's in rpmfusion free for Fedora and there's a PPA for Ubuntu. It supports most codecs and containers, and can step forward/back frame by frame, and properly switch between forward/back without needing to skip. It will also seek in containers that normally don't support it, like MPEG-TS. It's able to do this by building an index ...


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Even though I'm not retired yet, I'm "old enough to remember the ISPF editor on IBM mainframes": I still use (and love) it more or less every day ... To actually answer your question, I suggest you have a look at SPFLite. Here is a quote about it, from Wikipedia: Editors used in the PC environment typically operate in a significantly different manner ...


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Sketch up is a good one to use, there is a free web version as well as a premium version, but the free version is good enough for a beginner. Here is the link: sketchup.com


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Clonezilla is a FOSS "partition and disk imaging/cloning program similar to True Image® or Norton Ghost®. It helps you to do system deployment, bare metal backup and recovery".


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Lazygit Lazygit (written in Go using the gocui library) fits all my needs. It’s simple, intuitive for user that doesn’t know Vim or Emacs and it gets the job done. Notable features: adding files easily - a staging files one by one (space) or en masse (a) committing files (c) and signing commits using PGP resolving merge conflicts (interactively) - m ...


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Expanding on @BeloumiX's answer: GNU Nano (named after the non-free editor it imitated, pico) is a simple curses-based text editor. Working with it is based on various (not so many) keyboard shortcuts, like Ctrl+O for writing the file, Ctrl+W for searching and Ctrl+X for quitting. It takes up the whole terminal, and has a small "menu" at the bottom ...


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Try nano. This editor is written in C, so it should have not much dependencies, and is much easier to use than vi.


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Sorry to post an answer, but this is too long for a comment. Tl'dr; As far as I know, this can't be (easily) done. Each keyboard/mouse/joystick is just a dumb HID and Windows combines their inputs into one single queue. Now, you can (if you can code) hook the event queue and intercept keyboard events. If you find one that interests you, you can "consume"...


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