3

gitfs should fit your needs: tracks changes: Yes, in a git repo mostly small files: Perfect. Huge files might be problematic, though. Non-root users should not be able to modify the history/versions of a file: Fits. Git is just used as backend, and mounted as file system. So only normal file system operations should be possible unless the user has direct ...


2

Bidirectional syncing is the exact goal of Unison, see https://www.cis.upenn.edu/~bcpierce/unison/ : Unison is a file-synchronization tool for OSX, Unix, and Windows. It allows two replicas of a collection of files and directories to be stored on different hosts (or different disks on the same host), modified separately, and then brought up to date by ...


2

Based on what you've said, I think you're probably right that Ceph is your best option, provided that you can give it enough processing power. However, BTRFS is probably not your best option for a storage backend. Ceph already has good options for detection and handling of bit-rot, and you will get much better performance by using those and running on top ...


1

I think you might want to reconsider your needs and priorities, because they are inconsistent. (Cheap, highly reliable, scalable - pick 2 at most) The most incongruous is talking about a Raspberry Pi and the bit rot. (Also, the links you provided are probably not that relevant in as much as they are not about general storage) You may be able to "get ...


1

afsctool There is a afsctool tool which allow to compress the folders in HFS+ file system. AFSC (Apple File System Compression) tool is an utility that can be used to apply HFS+ compression to file(s), decompress HFS+ compressed file(s), or get information about existing HFS+ compressed file(s). Mac OS 10.6 or later is required. However it needs to be ...


1

I was able to get my data back using UFS Explorer Scan for partitions (~18h/2TB) Get file list (~1h/2TB) Restore process (~24h/2TB) P.S.: In most cases Standard version will be more than enough.


1

TestDisk (Windows/Mac/Linux) is a free open source partition scanner and data recovery tool. It is very useful in recovering lost partitions. TestDisk can: Fix partition table, recover deleted partition Recover FAT32 boot sector from its backup Rebuild FAT12/FAT16/FAT32 boot sector Fix FAT tables Rebuild NTFS boot sector Recover NTFS boot sector from its ...


1

If I can't deal with partitions using built-in tools to the running OS ('cause you can't mess with mounted/in-use partitions, etc) I boot with a Linux Mint LiveDVD and run parted (command line) or gparted (GUI front end). Hits all of your points except running in Windows (of any version), which I think would be moot due to the operating on filesystems that ...


1

To answer the question "Are there any providers that have much higher limits?": You are using a Virtual Private Server. The entire system is in your hands, only the hardware is in your provider hands. Hence your issue is only related to the software configuration you set-up (or the default one you left as is), not related to the VPS provider. Inode ...


1

Have you thought on creating a file system inside a file? you can create a file, mount it and have all your files served from there. see details here


1

The best way is check first if directory exist and if not create. After this write file if(!Directory.Exists(path)) { Directory.CreateDirectory(path); }


1

GParted uses a range of tools (some I think are inbuilt, but most probably rely on external utilities (e.g ntfsprogs). It is packaged and included in most Linux distros. As far as I can tell it can support checking and repairing FAT32, NTFS and HFS+. FAT32 and NTFS both can be fixed - with NTFS I think there is a flag set so that if a Windows system ...


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