11

Does anyone know of a piece of software that can perform a restartable raw copy of a disk drive? You are basically describing GNU ddrescue which can be run from a bootable Linux live CD/DVD/USB (I like SystemRescueCD quite a lot). Cloning the drive First, you should identify the drives you have connected to your computer with the fdisk -l command. Here is ...


7

If you have a Linux machine available (if not, there are several Live distributions you could boot from CD/DVD or USB-stick), you might wish to take a look at DDRescue. That's a command-line tool using a sophisticated algorithm to create copies (clones) of "damaged" disks – either directly to another disk (e.g. if you have two drives available with your ...


6

Recuva is a good application to recover deleted files(picture, video, music, documents and other type of files). We can operate it in 2 modes- Normal and Deep modes. Normal mode is fast and recovers less files. Deep mode is slow but it recovers almost every thing we deleted, out of which files in good or normal conditions can be recovered.


6

The sort of tool you are looking for is unlikely to exist. Understanding why is a big part of the issue. File recovery is a very wide field. It includes things like: Undelete a file Oops, I formatted the partition The filesystem is corrupt or disk is damged. What can I get off? This excludes the more interesting/specialized cases like forensic analysis ...


5

As already pointed out in the comments on the question itself, having the drive already re-partitioned and installed several GiBs have lessened your chances drastically – but there might still be a chance, at least for parts of the data. First, let me repeat Mawg's advice to not use the drive until your recovery is done, specifically don't boot from it – or ...


4

TestDisk (Windows/Mac/Linux) is a free open source partition scanner and data recovery tool. It is very useful in recovering lost partitions. TestDisk can: Fix partition table, recover deleted partition Recover FAT32 boot sector from its backup Rebuild FAT12/FAT16/FAT32 boot sector Fix FAT tables Rebuild NTFS boot sector Recover NTFS boot sector from its ...


4

It may well be that you cannot recover 100% of your data. For videos, that might be acceptable, and you might only see a few visual glitches, if they are even visible. For things like spread sheets or word/PDF documents, etc, it is more problematic. I have had success, under similar circumstances, with Unstoppable Copier. Recovers files from disks ...


3

There is Access Data FTK Imager Lite which is a ~5 year old free version of their commercial product. I never exported unallocated space before, but it seems to work: Add a logical drive as an evidence item. Expand the tree Select [unallocated space] Right click, select "Export Logical Image (AD1)..." Click "Add..." to define the destination image file ...


3

I had good luck with Unstoppable Copy. I was able to get many files from a hard drive with many bad sectors when an ordinary Windows or DOS copy was giving me CRC errors. Most of the files were usable, even those that Windows was failing to copy; I only lost a few photos that had too much data gone. Spinrite may actually be more effective at fixing data, ...


3

I have a drive that is 2TB and has started clicking and I want to recover the lost files Then you really should use data recovery programs, like gddrescue combined with partition/filesystem recovery programs or data carvers (testdisk/photorec). SpinRite isn't made to just recover data from a worsening (clicking) drive, according to Steve's video it reads, ...


3

Long story short, I've installed Ubuntu on one of the partitions on my external HDD where my personal data was saved. Installing Ubuntu means the partition was formatted from NTFS to FAT and added around 1GB of data. However, I used File Scavenger Data Recovery Utility and it managed to restore my files that were on my HDD partition before installing ...


3

You could use Bulk Rename Utility. It is a freeware, GUI tool for Windows. It can rename files in a variety of ways. To rename based on the EXIF date/time, look at the option for Auto Date (8). If you set this to Taken (Original) it will use the EXIF tags. You can specify how the date/time should be formatted, and what separators between segments.


2

If it's not important that this software is free to use, I can suggest you Recover My Files. You can see its information in the below: Website Recover My Files Main Features Improved partition recovery. Faster recovery speed and better validation of duplicate or invalid files. New file type signatures for File carving. Faster saving and loading of search ...


2

TestDisk is the tool you probably want to use. It is cross-platform (so you can use it on Linux as well as on Mac OS X). You will need to run it as root, and have it discovering the disk. If possible, it does recover the folder hierarchy, file names, and/or file metadata. Whether it's possible depends on several things: what file system was used (e.g. with ...


2

Cobian Backup was the solution I have used to fulfil my needs. For configuring remote management of the other computers in my house, I can setup a home domain scenario (which also allows for remote deployment of the software). Upon initial install you are greeted with the following: The installation is very straight forward and is over quite quick. In the ...


2

It may well be that you cannot recover 100% of your data. I have had success, under similar circumstances, with Unstoppable Copier. Recovers files from disks with physical damage. Allows you to copy files from disks with problems such as bad sectors, scratches or that just give errors when reading data. The program will attempt to recover every ...


2

Dvdisaster is an open source program specifically tailored for imaging damaged discs. It can generate a copy of the failing disc, which you can then mount or analyze with common data recovery software (e.g. TestDisk). It is mainly targeted to Linux, but versions for other operating systems are available. This screenshot is from Wikipedia: Note that ...


2

Acronis True Image might be something for you. I'm using it since years and it works fine. it costs ~40 EUR it can exclude folders from the backup (see screenshot below, sorry it's German) you can start backups manually saves in TIB file format, which is a True Image proprietary format. supports Windows 7 through Windows 10 (they even list XP, but that ...


2

The Linux System Rescue CD can be burnt onto a CD or USB drive and when booted from offers lots of tools to repair your system, (even if it is a windows system). Includes partition editing tools, (GParted & GNU Parted) sfdisk and TestDisk which can: Fix partition table, recover deleted partition Recover FAT32 boot sector from its backup Rebuild FAT12/...


2

While I'm on Linux and have my solutions scripted, I just checked and the main components are available for Windows, too: Exiftool and JHead. This is a command-line utility, so you need to run it from your cmd prompt. Useful commands include: jhead -ft <image> # set the file's time stamp from Exif data jhead -n<format_string> <image> # ...


2

You can use exiv2. Hans-Henry Jakobsen has written a very neat tutorial about it. Here's a quote: Linux exiv2 -r'%Y%m%d-%H%M_:basename:' rename $(ls) Windows (from the command prompt) exiv2.exe -r %Y%m%d-%H%M_:basename: rename d* Windows (in a MS-DOS batch file) exiv2.exe -r %%Y%%m%%d-%%H%%M_:basename: rename d* The markers you need to use ...


1

I was able to get my data back using UFS Explorer Scan for partitions (~18h/2TB) Get file list (~1h/2TB) Restore process (~24h/2TB) P.S.: In most cases Standard version will be more than enough.


1

TestDisk (Windows/Mac/Linux) is a free open source partition scanner and data recovery tool. It is very useful in recovering lost partitions. TestDisk can: Fix partition table, recover deleted partition Recover FAT32 boot sector from its backup Rebuild FAT12/FAT16/FAT32 boot sector Fix FAT tables Rebuild NTFS boot sector Recover NTFS boot sector from its ...


1

main and backup partition tables were then re-written so the partitions were 'lost', however the partitons were not overwritten Then it is a super easy job for TestDisk. The tool has to be run on the target disk and it will show you a TUI (textual user interface): sudo testdisk /dev/sda It will scan the drive and show you a list of detected partitions. ...


1

You can go with Stellar Phoenix SQL database repair software. As I had used this tool previously when my SQL server 2012 database was corrupt. I had tried DBCC CHECKDB with repair_allow_data_loss but got same error message. I had downloaded three tools: Stellar Phoenix, Kernal & systools but Stellar Phoenix suited me best. Finally bought this tool to ...


1

You seem to use Windows and look for Windows-based solution so this answer may not apply to you at all. I think that rsnapshot would do the job. I installed it on my OpenWRT router and make all backups on disk drive plugged into the router. It uses rsync under the hood and is very Unixy in nature. I first learned about it after reading this review by Eric ...


1

When I had a similar issue last time, someone recommended TestDisk which helped. I wanted to close as a duplicate, but probably it was on a different site, so I give it as an answer. TestDisk runs on Windows is free and open source can fix partition table, recover deleted partition can recover NTFS boot sector from its backup can fix MFT using MFT mirror ...


1

System Rescue CD is a live ISO that you can burn onto a CD or a USB drive and then attempt repair of your drive. It is free, gratis & consists of Open Source tools. The kernel supports all important file systems (ext2/ext3/ext4, reiserfs, btrfs, xfs, jfs, vfat, ntfs), as well as network filesystems (samba and nfs)


1

If you can access the partition via UMS1, I recommend you taking a look at PhotoRec. The software is available for free and cross-platform – so regardless which OS runs on your computer, here's what to do: connect your device via USB in USB Mass Storage mode fire up PhotoRec tell it to scan the connected "drive" There's a PhotoRec Step By Step guide ...


1

I tried with a lot of programs but all of them needed that my mobile phone would be rooted This is for a reason. An Android application cannot get low-level disk access unless it uses root permissions. Regarding computer software, in the past it was possible to "expose" the drives as external USB drives to a PC, hence allowing for ther physical imaging. ...


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