23

You are probably looking for iotop. It provides the information you are looking for per process. You will need to run it with super-user privileges if you run a recent kernel since some changes to the NET_ADMIN permissions have been done something like a year ago. Simply install it and run sudo iotop Bwm-ng can also output some disk I/o stats when you cycle ...


9

I recommend iStat Menus, personally. I'm still using version 3 of it on 10.6, but version 4 supports up thru 10.9. They don't have a screenshot of it, but you can see they support GPU monitoring from the version history page: Added support for monitoring multiple GPUs. Improved GPU monitoring. To specifically address your other points: Plots ...


9

Monitorix might come in handy here. It does not exactly focus on Apache, but of course includes Apache-specific data: Monitorix: Apache Statistics (source: Monitorix.Org; click image for larger variant) As the graph shows, you can easily see a "journal" of Apache resource usage: idle/busy workers, requests, CPU-usage. Together with plenty of other ...


8

This is one of the things Nagios is designed for. It can monitor just about any externally visible service (HTTP, IMAP, POP, MySQL, SSH etc) as well as any internal stuff on the server (disk use, system load, number of processes) via what's called NRPE. It will send emails on service problems, optionally with constraints (don't email Joe outside working ...


8

What you're looking for falls under the category of monitoring software. I've used mon for that. Now I'm not an expert, so I can't really say how it compares to the many other monitoring tools out there, but based on your description it should work well for you. Tool we can install in our web servers → apt-get install mon or yum install mon or whatever it ...


7

I have been using Web Alert (Google Play) for quite some time and find it the most useful one. It's completely free but it is only available on android phones. Web Alert is simple, it has a ton of functionality and it does not seem to affect my battery life or waste my mobile data usage in any noticeable way (although I'm screening seven web pages at the ...


6

I used to use the following script, it does everything you asked for. You just need to add a cronjob entry so that it gets executed regularly: #!/bin/bash # Simple SHELL script for Linux and UNIX system monitoring with # ping command # ------------------------------------------------------------------------- # Copyright (c) 2006 nixCraft project <http://...


6

You can use WhatPulse: Most features are free Windows/Mac/Linux It records the total time spent in each program Stats are available online as well as on the desktop client (from which you can export them as CSV). Support several computers It records the number of clicks per application: It records the time spent per application: As a premium service you ...


6

Tasker might be an app to go with here. It doesn't come for free (there's a 7 day trial at their homepage, but then it's ~USD 5 if you really want to use it after that), and it requires some effort to get into it – but if you ask me, it's definitely worth it. Other apps from "the same section" (Automation apps) might be able to achieve what you want, but I ...


5

htop can display per-process I/O rates, but you need to have added one of the IO_READ_RATE/IO_WRITE_RATE/IO_RATE columns.


5

A good option is to register at: Change Detection This will track changes for you. Give the service the URL of the web site(s) of interest and it will email you when it sees a change.


5

Ubuntu already includes a disk space warning alert as part of dconf. You can configure the settings by installing the dconf-tools: sudo apt-get install dconf-tools Start the dconf Editor: dconf-editor Press CRTL + F to show the find option. Enter "disk space" and click on "Next" You can set the free percent warning to whatever you like. This example ...


4

You can use pidstat (free and open-source): Description: The pidstat command is used to monitor processes and threads currently being managed by the Linux kernel. It can also monitor the children of those processes and threads. With its -d option, pidstat can report I/O statistics, providing that you have a recent Linux kernel (2.6.20+) with ...


4

Let me repeat a recommendation I already placed twice: Monitorix. It can be used as Webbased Network analyzer Apache graphing tool for Linux But it also monitors "local resources" such as CPU, disks, and – sensors: Monitorix: Complete LM-Sensors and GPU temperatures / Disk drive temperatures and health (source: Monitorix; click to enlarge) Monitorix ...


4

I use Monit for that, it's free, open source (AGPL) and a Debian package available. It supports: Daemon mode - poll programs at a specified interval Monitoring modes - active, passive or manual Start, stop and restart of programs Group and manage groups of programs Process dependency definition Logging to syslog or own logfile Configuration - comprehensive ...


4

Since you wish to use it as a widget/gadget I found this website which helps you run gadgets on windows 8. I narrowed the huge list of available gadgets to a list of the ones you might need given your specs: All CPU Meter - AddGadgets.com Control System - AddGadgets.com CPU Meter - Microsoft DriveInfo - Kris Thompson Drives Monitor - Igor M. Bushin ...


4

The Android app Web Alert (http://www.webalert.me) is by far the best for automatically checking web pages for changes and receiving notifications. It has several more features: View diffs of the changes. Free and without ads. Stores the versions of the webpage. Choose any frequency of the checks you like. Automate the navigation process (e.g. repeat the ...


4

I have always used API Monitor from Rohitab. Not only does it do what you want but it also has other functions. It supports Windows 7, including x64. Windows 10 is not (yet) listed as a supported OS (statements from the main page): Windows 2000, Windows XP 32-bit, Windows XP 64-bit x64, Windows Vista 32-bit, Windows Vista 64-bit x64, Windows 7 32-bit, ...


4

You might be able to use: https://www.digitalocean.com/community/tutorials/how-to-install-elasticsearch-logstash-and-kibana-elk-stack-on-ubuntu-14-04 Logstash forwards the logs to the central logging server. Also, rsyslog can be configured to forward to a central store, and cache logs locally with the following config setting: $WorkDirectory /rsyslog/work ...


4

You might want to log to SQLite databases instead of plain text files for the following reasons: SQLite is part of the python standard runtime library. Thus, databases can be created, filled and maintained very easily binary distribution consists of a single (scriptable) commandline executable, the sqlite shell, which can be used to easily query the logs ...


4

You can use smartctl. smartctl (Self-Monitoring, Analysis and Reporting Technology) is a command line utility or a tool in UNIX like operating system that perform SMART tasks such as printing the SMART self-test and error logs, enabling and disabling SMART automatic testing, and initiating device self-tests. To install: sudo apt-get install ...


4

The program in the video that you linked to is called Rescue Time Features you requested: tracks which programs I use for how long A.Tracks time spent on applications and websites, giving you an accurate picture of your day. Has a categorizing feature and shows me my usage A.Gives you detailed reports and data based on your activity. I have never used ...


4

How about this: A simple POSIX compliant shell script. I tested it with both GNU and busybox versions of wget and in bash and ash. It opens a connection every 10 seconds and exits when a connection is established. It informs the user that the website is up by displaying a message box using zenity framework. Alternatively, instead of using zenity it ...


4

We use Nagios for simple monitoring tasks: Your requirements: Open Source Can Monitor a site to see whether it is up or not Publish that data to a web interface Presents graphs and statistics More: Can monitor basically anything Send notification (e.g. emails) on certain events much more Try this demo of the interface.


3

You can use Xfire: free stats available online Windows 2000, XP, Vista, or Windows 7 (on Mac OS you can use MacFire, which is an open source implementation for of the Xfire network protocol for Mac OS X.) designed to record game stats:


3

At least as of macOS 10.14 Mojave, this is now built-in to Activity Monitor. Choose ‘Window → GPU History’ (or hit ⌘4):


3

You can use iostat: free and open source sudo apt-get install -y sysstat iostat ­-dx 3 will display extended device statistics since system start up in the first report, and the deltas for the last 3 seconds in subsequent reports until interrupted. Columns' meanings: Device: This column gives the device (or partition) name. tps: Indicate the ...


3

According to your requirement the best tool that I can recommend for you to use is Resource Monitor in windows operating system,because its great way to find out about the resources your system uses and to see what applications and services are making the most use of your system.you can refer the screenshot in the Overview tab. It shows a snapshot of your ...


3

You can take the software Anturis, which is free up to 5 monitors, with the ability to monitor various servers and all possible metrics. The alerts are effective:sms, emil and phone. There are troubleshooting options for people who don't feel like real experts.


3

Trackly is worth a look, it will email you an image of the webpage with changes highlighted. Hourly and daily checks available. It works well even with very dynamic web pages using tons of javascript and other fanciness. It's free while in beta.


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