37

EncFS is an encryption layer on top of an existing filesystem. I currently use it with a Dropbox-synced folder on Linux and OS X where it works perfectly. There is also experimental support for Windows, but I have not tried it. See also How to Encrypt Cloud Storage on Linux and Windows. LUKS is natively supported on Linux, and also has Windows support ...


30

You could continue using TrueCrypt. According to this blog post on grc.com: Yes, Virginia, TrueCrypt is still safe to use. to excerpt a key part of that article: And then the TrueCrypt developers were heard from . . . Steven Barnhart (@stevebarnhart) wrote to an eMail address he had used before and received several replies from “David.” The ...


29

VeraCrypt is an actively developed and maintained fork of TrueCrypt. Pros: Supported operating systems: Linux, Windows, OS X. Open Source (Apache License 2.0). Essentially identical interface to TrueCrypt. Supports TrueCrypt volumes. Fixes some TrueCrypt problems ('short'-password brute forcing). Supports hidden volumes.


18

I said it before, and I'll say it again: the best solution, unless you have very specific requirements, is to use your operating system's native encryption mechanism. This has superior integration, so it tends to be easier to use and administer not only for single-OS users and administrator but even for dual-OS users. This means: under Windows, use ...


14

Based on some additional research these alternatives looked useful as well. Much of this is excerpted from this articled titled: Replace TrueCrypt. Tc-play tc-play is a Free implementation of TrueCrypt based on dm-crypt, licensed under the 2-clause BSD license. It is in Debian sid (tcplay), and would serve as a full replacement of TrueCrypt... once a ...


12

You may want to check out Truecrypt.ch. They are a Swiss group who are working on taking over the codebase of Truecrypt and eventually create a new fork with a new name. Since recent information shows that Truecrypt is still safe to use, you may be best off with sticking to TrueCrypt until a better option is available. I have two main reasons for this ...


9

I found diskcryptor while looking for something entirely unrelated. It has a few nifty features - critically the ability to encrypt boot drives, the use of standard, proven, open source encryption algorithms, the ability to use intel and via's hardware accelerated encryption options. Its windows only and supports only windows partitions. It does boot and ...


8

You may use any XMPP client that supports OpenPGP or OTR. So each person could use a client of their choice, no need for all to use the same. But if the same client should be used cross-platform, have a look at Jitsi (License: LGPL), which uses Java. It supports OTR. See this (old) video: Your first OTR text chat with Jitsi. (XMPP works, like email, not ...


8

pyrite As far as I know, there's only one app out there that meets all of your criteria. All of your requirements (reproduced below) describe pyrite, though it can do more. "text area where I could paste text then encrypt or decrypt" "should be able to sign and check signatures" "Produces ASCII" (pyrite can do both) "Open source" (GPLv3) "Runs on Linux" (...


7

You can try Tox, a new encrypted IM client. It's in alpha stage, but the chat feature seems to work quite well. It has all the features you want: One on one messaging and group chats. It encrypts messages. Supports Mac OSX, Windows, and Linux. No setup needed. As mentioned earlier, the software is still in an alpha state, but I think it shows a ...


6

Not sure if it's possible at all to give a not-purely-opinon-based answer on a "what do you think about these" type of question. But let's give it a try (in the mean time, it's not like Truecrypt magically ceased to work over night). About the first alternative that you've listed, it does not so much matter where you host your website as it matters where ...


6

I would like to add one more tool to the list: SecurStick It is a tool written for a German computer magazine. What is very important to me is that the tool works without admin rights (it is designed for removable media) The caveat is that it creates a WebDAV service. The consequence is that Windows has no information about the encrypted drive's size and ...


5

According to The Register: In the past hour, crypto-guru Bruce Schneier has told us he's switched back to Symantec's PGPDisk to encrypt his data. Schneier wrote in 2007: There are several whole-disk encryption products on the market. I use PGP Disk's Whole Disk Encryption tool for two reasons. It's easy, and I trust both the company and the developers ...


5

You could use Cryptocat, a browser extension for encrypted chatting (similar to IRC, but more secure ;) Cryptocat supports all major browsers including: Chrom(e)(ium) Firefox Safari Opera OSX via the Apple App store.


5

There is a free and basic tool called CryptSync which is something like a cross between 7Zip (for compression and encryption) and SynchToy (for scheduled synch). You can synch compressed and encrypted copies of specified files and folders to your locally stored cloud folder which in turn synchs with the cloud storage. Although I like it, for me there are ...


5

Until a yearor two back, the definitive answer would have been TrueCrypt. I still use it myself, but, as it is no longer actively developed, you might want to choose one of the forks, based on its source code. VeraCrypt seems to be the best. It is cross-platform, gratis and its source code is published on the web for peer review. VeraCrpyt supports ...


5

i assume you are talking about Plausible deniability or to be more concrete Deniable encryption? well, read a bit further to https://www.privacytools.io/#encrypt and there is VeraCrypt recommended... since VeraCrypt and CipherShed are based on TrueCrypt they both provide a feature called "Hidden Volumes": all 3 of them are open source and therefore gratis ...


4

This is already built into the file browser (Nautilus)! Only it's combined with another feature, so it isn't straightforwardly discoverable. To encrypt, select one or more files. Right-click and select Compress. Pick one of the extensions that support encryption — I recommend .7z. Mnemonic, so your family knows what format to pick: take the first item in ...


4

One solution that would work on Windows is SecurStick. Don't let the German website scare you, the actual program will be English (except on German and Italian Windows installations, where it will be German or Italian, respectively). Biggest pro: All you need is a Windows PC and a web browser. Caveat: Windows won't know how large your drive is and assume it ...


4

boxcryptor Boxcryptor protects your files in the cloud no matter if you use Dropbox, Google Drive, Microsoft OneDrive, SugarSync, Box.net, or any other major cloud storage provider. It also supports all the clouds that use the WebDAV standard such as Cubby, Strato HiDrive, and ownCloud. Boxcryptor have free/paid versions.It works on all major platforms ...


4

tl;dr Integer.toHexString( new SecureRandom().nextInt() ) bd594090 JRuby Run your Ruby code on a JVM with JRuby. java.security.SecureRandom Java includes SecureRandom, a cryptographically strong random number generator (RNG). Pass the number of bits to be generated, right justified, with leading zeros. int x = new SecureRandom().nextInt() ; ...


3

I would also check out LibreCrypt, LibreCrypt (Open Source) Transparent on-the-fly disk encryption for Windows. LUKS compatible. (formerly DoxBox) Features Easy to use, with a 'wizard' for creating new 'containers'. Full transparent encryption, containers appear as removable disks in Windows Explorer. Explorer mode lets you access ...


3

In the free arena, Veracrypt is still an excellent choice and is being maintained with both patches and improvements, and is cross-platform. In the paid area, software like Checkpoint can do (for Windows, at least) what you want - including software on the USB drive that can both use Active Directory integration or a password entered when the drive is ...


3

My recommendation is to install Duplicity under Cygwin. This way you'll have the same software under all platforms, which means less to learn and manage (plus you can recover backups made under a different operating system, e.g. you can unpack your Windows backups under a Linux machine if your Windows machine crashes). Cygwin itself doesn't carry duplicity, ...


3

And, yet another name: BoxCryptor Classic. Pay attention: I'm talking about the classic version, not the new fancy one. The Classic flavour works pretty much like TC but it doesn't require you to predefine a size of the volume, all the files in a folder are encrypted if added to a volume that, when unmounted, makes them still visible but not accessible. ...


3

You can use GnuPG. The manual writes: The --recipient option is used once for each recipient and takes an extra argument specifying the public key to which the document should be encrypted. Of course, it encrypts and decrypts, it signs and verifies, is Free Software, and is available for many platforms.


3

I would suggest taking a look at gpg4usb: Not as small as a few kB but still only a 23 MB download Portable so you don't have to install to the machine in question just unzip and use. Runs on both Windows and Linux (Mac under development and in Alpha at the time of writing Sept 2014) Free (Libra & FLOSS) Public/Private Key based i.e. the recipient does ...


3

Yes, LibTomCrypt. LibTomCrypt implements most common cryptographic primitives (and many uncommon ones), including RSA (PKCS#1 v1.5, PSS and OAEP modes). The code is clean and portable C, so you can link it into applications written in pretty much any programming language. The library is made of small objects so that only the code you actually need will get ...


3

I'm going to assume that you only need the most standard capabilities and nothing fancy, so at most things like standard authenticated encryption primitives and thelike. No secret sharing, no format preserving encryption and no password based key derivation or other fancy password hashing schemes. So if you do indeed only need the basic schemes there are ...


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