43

ManicTime is a pretty awesome piece of software (free/pro with trial). It let's you track time by theme dimensions: Usage (Active or not) Application used Document (title of the document) Tags The pro version (also have trial) even let's you auto-tag time by using filters to select specific keywords. for example you can auto-tag all the time you spend in ...


24

I've had some success with RescueTime. It tracks software used, webpages visited, and has a free version too. Not open source though. If you're willing to do all the tracking yourself (e.g. I do this at work for loosely tracking projects) then I can recommend toggl.


14

I use Trello exactly for the same reasons. Why I think it is a great application? You can create different tasklists and include tasks with deadlines and notifications You can add other users to the same board You have access from the website AND from an Android application The interface is really easy and user-friendly You can attach files on your tasks ...


12

I use WhatPulse: Free Win/Mac/Linux It records the total time spent in each program, but it doesn't do any of your bonus features and doesn't have the graph of how much time was spent in program X at what time of day. Stats are available online as well as on the desktop client. Support several computers It records the number of clicks per application: As ...


11

I like Workrave (wiki), it does this perfectly. Workrave is available on Windows and Linux. Install it on Ubuntu with sudo apt-get install workrave Features: Three configurable types of breaks: short, long and day-limit Ability to postpone / skip a particular break (although I recommend not to abuse this feature) Workrave is fully configurable, here is ...


7

I use and love Wunderlist. Let's see how far high on your list it's at: Works on Mac OSX. Yup. I'm a Mac user and Wunderlist is perfect. Sometimes, it can feel a little heavy, but mostly no issues. Possible way to see all lists that I have. Yes. There's a sidebar with all your lists, and lists that Wunderlist makes for you. For example, a list called ...


7

For OS X, I've used Dejal Time Out. It's also available in the Mac App Store. It's free. It has some pretty fine-grained settings: It even has a feature to play music of your choice during your break.


7

Try my Portable Kanban. Disclosure: I'm developer of PK. it works offline it's free, can be used commercially. it works on Windows only. It has a Pomodoro timer that is configurable (work/short pause/long pause intervals, sound) It has a lot of options for configuring UI and board. May be used for teams too (requires Redis server). Here's a screenshot of ...


6

You can use WhatPulse: Most features are free Windows/Mac/Linux It records the total time spent in each program Stats are available online as well as on the desktop client (from which you can export them as CSV). Support several computers It records the number of clicks per application: It records the time spent per application: As a premium service you ...


6

ProcrastiTracker is an open source time tracking tool for Windows that automatically tracks what applications and documents you use, and allows you to view statistics on your usage in great detail:


6

I can recommend my own software WAYD! In addition to tracking the active program (it records the program name and the window title), every x minutes it will pop up a window that covers your entire screen and asks you, "What are you doing?" I find that, while it's a little bit annoying, most of the time just knowing which programs were open is not very ...


6

All your requirements can be easily fulfilled with a GMail account and the GTasks Android application. The TaskList can be accessed using any browser on desktop computers, by logging into your GMail account, and GTasks which is, in fact, a container for Gmail tasklist, can be used from mobile devices. Here's the The Complete Guide to Google Tasks and How ...


6

Priority Oriented TODO list manager I highly recommend emacs orgmode Reasons: You can prioritize your items Recurring tasks open source (part of gnu emacs, included by default in modern releases!) Linux (and other OS's) local files (you can place under version control) I did get emacs running on my Android tablet (but it's not super easy) It's really ...


5

I've used Evo in the past. It allows you to select from three different modes 20-20-20 (Every 20 minutes staring at a screen, you focus your eyes 20 feet away for 20 seconds) 60-5 (60 minutes staring at a screen followed by 5 minute break) Custom (set your own break mode). You can also install an add-on in Chrome which enables desktop notifications, ...


5

Have you tried Quire? It can: create tasks within your projects easily, has quite a nice UI for noting things down, you need to create an account to use it, so password protected, can assign priority and filter tasks according to priority as well, list completed tasks, add tags, schedule tasks, is web based, it is free (but if it ever changes, you can ...


5

Topic looks a little bit outdated but XNote Stopwatch is ideally what the op was looking for. Hope that helps anyone else.


4

Perhaps you want to give Hamster a try. Although I never used it at work, it has a minimal GUI, it is easy to switch a task and you can export to some formats. With the invoice, I am not that sure if you can realize it. But it has some overview functionality, with which you can filter your tasks and then export it to a file. Perhaps you can use that ...


4

You can use Visual TimeAnalyzer: non-free Log individual users or specific projects, and compile detailed accounts of time spent within each program. Track work time, pauses, projects, costs, software and internet use. Track visited web pages Windows 8 (excl. Apps), 7, Vista, XP, 2000 or Windows Server


4

Moodle would be the software of your choice. Most online course creators/educators use Moodle recently, and has been evolving pretty fast. It also has a large community. So, it would be easy to setup and navigate. I have used a site which is built on Moodle, and it's pretty smooth and very easy to use with a wonderful set of features. Its features ...


4

Habitica is a web-based application, with an accompanying android app which can help you. Mind you, depending on your tastes(and age), the RPG element might be juvenile or extremely cool. It also has an accompanying android app. Gantt facilities are not native but can still be patched through on this application. Details can be found here.


4

I use an open source timer called Hourglass. It has a great interface and is very lightweight. It can alert you visually or using audio alerts as well. It meets all of your requirements including, Free - It's open source. Visual Alerts on Windows 7 - Popups, flashing, audio alerts which can all be configured. Capable of 1-hour intervals, even if it only ...


3

You can use Xfire: free stats available online Windows 2000, XP, Vista, or Windows 7 (on Mac OS you can use MacFire, which is an open source implementation for of the Xfire network protocol for Mac OS X.) designed to record game stats:


3

Have a look at YouTrack by JetBrains While this may not do everything you require, at least it can offer: Self-Hosted Tomcat Installation Bug & Issue Tracking Project Management Time Management Free for 10 users Follows Agile methodologies (If so required) Web-Based with keyboard shortcuts for most major tasks You can also generate reports that shows ...


3

This is currently not possible without jailbreaking the device. If you're jailbroken, you can use App Analytics. This app tracks how long an app is active for, as well as the number of times the app has been launched and when the last time the app was opened. The app also lets you narrow down the results on a monthly basis.


3

Rescue time meets the following requirements: Logs foreground app usage (and also time spent on websites). Generates detailed reports by app, time period etc. Data can be accessed on the web (via your account) as well as on your phone. There is a premium version but all the above features are free.


3

You can use RSIGuard: Windows Non-free focus on RSI organize regular physical exercise: has many settings: Other ideas: List of repetitive strain injury software


3

Time Doctor seems to be a perfect fit for the requirements you mentioned. It tracks your time with the simple trigger of a go button. And, you can click break when you are not working. And yes, it stores everything in a database/dashboard. It's like giving you an analytics of your workday. It's also open source. So, it works with Windows, Linux and OS X. ...


3

If you are OK with an online version I suggest RescueTime. It installs some software on your computer, then monitors every executable you use and all webpages you visit. These are all categorized (an advantage of being a centrally hosted solution) and after some time it shows you the time spent in these categories (either in your browser and/or my weekly ...


3

As apparently there is no program like this so I made my own. It is a simple Ruby script collecting data and producing extremely simple statistics - https://github.com/matkoniecz/Beholder An example of output: Unique entries: 120 (0%) - Saudi Arabia's War on Witchcraft — The Atlantic - Mozilla Firefox 150 (0%) - Stormscapes 2 on Vimeo - Mozilla Firefox 348 ...


3

WatchMe is nice if you want to have multiple timers in a single window. As you can see from the screenshot you can view multiple countdown timers or stopwatches in one window, and group timers/stopwatches into tabs. Timers can also be named. The user interface is very simple too so it shouldn't make you feel too nervous.


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