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9

The exiftool command line utility (from the package of the same name) reads and writes EXIF information. The “writing” can include renaming the file. There are examples in the manual under “Renaming examples”. You want something like (untested) exiftool -d '%Y-%m-%d' -filename'<${model;}-${datetimeoriginal;}.%e' *.jpg To process files in subdirectories ...


5

one possible solution. exiftool exiftool -r "e:\New Folder" -Make -Model -focallength -shutterspeed -iso -aperture -flash -csv >pictures.csv You can then import the data into excel or librecalc and generate graphs or sort the data.


4

The answer to most of your points is the excellent Phil Harvey's ExifTool the only missing point is that it doesn't have a GUI in and of itself. There are, however, a number GUI's that work with ExifTool - personally I recommend pyExifGUI but you will also need to install python. Must be able to edit the EXIF tags, not just view them - Yes Must be freeware ...


3

You could use Bulk Rename Utility. It is a freeware, GUI tool for Windows. It can rename files in a variety of ways. To rename based on the EXIF date/time, look at the option for Auto Date (8). If you set this to Taken (Original) it will use the EXIF tags. You can specify how the date/time should be formatted, and what separators between segments.


3

Before Gilles submitted this excellent answer, I was experimenting with pyRenamer, a GUI tool written in Python. It allows renaming of files en masse based on portions of their existing file names, as well as using their metadata (for photos and music). It was straightforward to use for me. I managed to use the following file name pattern to rename my files:...


3

I've used the batch conversion option in IrfanView to do this previously. Here's a sample image with a date overlaid sampled from the photos EXIF data. This can be accomplished through the IrfanView Batch Conversion/Rename... function and you can process multiple images as a batch. Instructions Open Irfanview and choose the Batch Conversion/Rename... ...


2

I'm using JHead to manipulate JPeg Matadata. It's available for Linux (which I use), but also for OSX and Windows. It's a command-line utility, and can be used e.g. to adjust time stamps of a photo based on its Exif tags – but also to adjust the Exif tags, if e.g. your camera's time was setup wrongly For details, it has a documentation (and a man page on ...


2

For this and more you could use Obscuracam, a great idea and app by the Guardian project. It doesn't work in the way you describe, but can be used as a camera that takes pictures without leaving any sensitive metadata, thus adding no extra step to the process. Note that as the application isn't designed for your use case, but I do believe it fits well.


2

SendReduced is an open-source, or paid for the pro version, Android app that allows you to: Original file is not overwritten. Set the maximum resolution that you wish to send photos to another destination Select Multiple Images to "Send" Reduced Files can be given a name can be a simple sequential number, random number, etc. You can select which application ...


2

You can use exiv2. Hans-Henry Jakobsen has written a very neat tutorial about it. Here's a quote: Linux exiv2 -r'%Y%m%d-%H%M_:basename:' rename $(ls) Windows (from the command prompt) exiv2.exe -r %Y%m%d-%H%M_:basename: rename d* Windows (in a MS-DOS batch file) exiv2.exe -r %%Y%%m%%d-%%H%%M_:basename: rename d* The markers you need to use ...


2

While I'm on Linux and have my solutions scripted, I just checked and the main components are available for Windows, too: Exiftool and JHead. This is a command-line utility, so you need to run it from your cmd prompt. Useful commands include: jhead -ft <image> # set the file's time stamp from Exif data jhead -n<format_string> <image> # ...


2

You can use exiftool to removed all of the metadata and to output what is left, i.e. the image to standard out in binary format with the command: exiftool filename.jpg -all= -o - -b And of course md5sum will except standard in as an input so you should be able to construct a pipe such as: exiftool filename.jpg -all= -o - -b | md5sum -


2

2018 UPDATE: The other answer is better! Far from perfect, but Nautilus can do something like that with an extension: ✅ Shows differently pictures that contain GPS latitude/longitude in their EXIF. Problem: The presence of GPS information is textual, which is difficult to notice, making my workflow less efficient. ❌ Not thumbnail-centric: Only one column, ...


2

You could try IrfanView. It is fast, lightweight image viewer. For viewing images, you can go to Properties/Settings, then JPG, then there is an option for "Auto-rotate image according to EXIF info". If you disable this option, then you can see which way round the images are. For fixing the rotation, look at the JPEG Lossless Rotation feature (Shift+J). ...


1

I did find a python/pySide Qt4 tool called pyExofToolGUI by hvdwolf which should work on OS-X, not having a Mac I can't be 100% sure, I did find that for Windows 10 a little work was needed to get it running and will be posting my changes up later if anybody is interested. Free Gratis & Open Source Cross Platform Thumbnail display Looks to give access ...


1

The Geographic-Map of the android gallery app "A Photo Manager" (where i am the author of) shows markers where photos where taken/geo-tagged. I currently use the app with 20 000 photos in 800 different folders on sd-card on my old android-4.2 tablet (and on my new android-7.1 handset), 13 000 photos have exif-geo data available on android f-droid.org app ...


1

digiKam fits most of your requirements. It is a free and open source image viewer and library manager for Linux. It has a bunch of managing features around editing tags and EXIF information and also supports GPS location data. It has a map feature that using Google Maps can overlay your pictures over a map. To access it, be sure to click the "Map" button ...


1

I would recommend using ImageMagick as it can convert and watermark your photos as a batch from the command line. Adding the frame and filter should be possible as well although I'm not sure how difficult it would be.


1

My favorite for this task is the Faststone Image Viewer, the tool is able to auto rotate images and does it lossless. To rotate a whole folder of pictures, first select all pictures in the overview, then click Tools/JPEG Lossless Rotate/Auto-Rotate based on EXIF. The tool itself is free for home users. It covers your requirements but for 3b, where I'm not ...


1

Piwigo with the piwigo-openstreetmap extension works well with geolocations captured by the camera. Support for other meta data stored in the picture (e.g. keywords and description) didn't work for me out of the box, but is supposed to be supported as per their website.


1

I'm not around an android right now so I can't test/confirm details but... I believe that PhotoEdit will do that with a work flow like this: Default Camera Share function Photo Editor Save Modify Exif Data (enter text) hit OK Say yes to Overwrite prompt Add the metadata as proper EXIF data so yes contained in the file. In regards to the free requirement......


1

Oh, there are several of those. I have not tried any of them myself, but the probably best candidates seem to be: PhotoMap Maker: meeting your criteria, but seems no longer maintained. PhotoGeolocator seems to be worth a look as well. EagleEye is probably the best choice here. I use its companion app PhotoMap, and am quite happy with it (it's based on the ...


1

GraphicConverter is a $40 shareware application for image editing and manipulation that has lots of features geared towards batch operation and image meta data manipulation. It's quaintly referred to as the swiss army knife of image editors and I believe that's a very accurate description. It can import more than 200 different types of image forms and export ...


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