Hot answers tagged

76

I use youtube-dl for downloading videos from YouTube. It's a free console program (public domain licence), written in Python. I've used it on Windows and Linux and it worked well. (According to the official site it should work on Mac OS X too.) By default it downloads the video in the best quality provided by YouTube. If it's not playable with VLC you can ...


73

Handbrake is one of the best free (and open-source) video converters around. It's fast, powerful, and simple. It's also quite good at converting audio. It's a good match for you because it's... Free (Zero Cost and FOSS) Very lightweight - it does nothing but convert stuff Extremely feature-filled - you can tweak every aspect of conversion Simple and ...


35

ffmpeg would do this, and I've had excellent luck with the winff front end to it. It'll give you the commands should you want to do it manually, let you batch stuff out, or strip out the audio. It also has a sane set of common presets for things you want to do


30

I would recommend VLC it will play just about any video/audio you throw at it (except rmvb) it is not under 30mb in size, it's around 100mb (after installation), but this is due to it containing all the codecs it needs instead of relying on the system codecs - I don't think you will find much improvement here if you count the size that other players would ...


23

I'd recommend ActivePresenter. You record your screencast first, and some of your features are added afterwards. Going through your list of requirements: ✔ Dynamic zooming of the page There's a feature called "Zoom & Pan" (see YouTube explanation) where you can select an area of the recording and have the final video zoom in to that. Alternatively you ...


21

I like Format Factory. It supports a very wide range of formats and media types. Its features include: Fast and light, it does nothing but convert software. Supports a wide range of formats and media types. Supports batch converting. Supports skins. Is free as in beer. I'm not sure if it supports FLAC, though...


19

I would suggest using the command line and ffmpeg as in: ffmpeg -ss start_time -i input_file .ext -t duration -vcodec copy -acodec copy output_file .ext .ext must be a supported video type and the same in both cases note there should be no space between the name and .ext it is only there above to get the bold and italic to work. -ss should be before the ...


18

The command line editor MLT melt can function as a command line player; this is what I get in terminal: $ melt ./testvideo.mp4 +-----+ +-----+ +-----+ +-----+ +-----+ +-----+ +-----+ +-----+ +-----+ |1=-10| |2= -5| |3= -2| |4= -1| |5= 0| |6= 1| |7= 2| |8= 5| |9= 10| +-----+ +-----+ +-----+ +-----+ +-----+ +-----+ +-----+ +-----+ +-----+ +---------------...


15

You can use FFmpeg: Free and open-source Runs on Windows Allows to trim: e.g. to cut the first 2 seconds: ffmpeg -ss 2 -i input.flv -vcodec copy -acodec copy output.flv Is CLI so you can batch.


14

Development of mplayer has stopped (edit: resumed) and you should consider replacing it with mpv which supports this feature. Framestep forward with . and backwards with ,.


14

I would recommend Media Player Classic - Home Cinema. It has the same interface as the old media player in WinXP but plays most video and audio files. I find MPC-HC is easier to turn subtitles on and off compared to VLC. It is about 36mb and is open source.


13

Two recommendations: 1.DVDSOFT (Stand alone): Their free apps work as modules where you can choose which feature to download & install, they have a full studio program which works as (audio video dvd converter for mobile and iphone devices and video downloader) As for DVDSOFT youtube downloader module, all what you have to do is to copy the video link, ...


13

JDownloader works great: freeware ads-free (make sure you uncheck/skip the spyware when installing JDownloader) standalone works with Windows/Linux/Mac automatic acknowledgement if some video triggers "18+ years only" warning. ability to download batches (GUI that accepts a list of URLs) can download all video playlists can be configured to download all ...


13

As you initially already watch the tutorial online, and most likely use Firefox to do so, please take a look at DownloadHelper: DownloadHelper is a free Firefox extension for downloading and converting videos from many sites with minimum effort. It sits in your toolbar, grayed out ­– and as soon as it detects media (images, audio/video files) if takes on ...


13

VLC has an extension called Previous Frame for frame-stepping backwards. Extension Installation: Put the file in the VLC subdir /lua/extensions, by default: Windows (all users): %ProgramFiles%\VideoLAN\VLC\lua\extensions\ Windows (current user): %APPDATA%\VLC\lua\extensions\ Linux (all users): /usr/share/vlc/lua/extensions/ Linux (current user): ~/.local/...


12

Blender (free) has a powerful built-in video editor that's pretty straightforward to use. You load content in as strips and then you can adjust these on the timeline, it has a real-time preview window and also has effects that you can overlay on your video. Minus the couple minutes that it would take you to learn the ins and outs, it performs all you ask. ...


12

You can try VLC from videolan.org. It is free, but you should donate if you use it (especially in a business environment). :) It supports up to 32x playback speed - 32 seconds real footage in 1 second - so, 8 hours in 15 minutes. But you should ask yourself - you really can catch up something in that speed? And the more important thing is: your processor ...


11

I'm going to answer this by recommending gstreamer. You're probably going to hate this answer, because it technically satisfies your requirements, while not being GUI-based. But that's okay, because someone else may find that this is the best tool for the job for them. Basically, if you get a build of gstreamer with all the codecs enabled, it supports an ...


11

I have recommended Virtual Dub on another question asking for a tool for efficiently cutting movies. Virtual Dub meets each of the requirements specified but how it handles images is a little... different. Virtual Dub effortlessly provides the following functionality: trimming video clips combining multiple clips previewing the video before exporting it ...


11

I like the Vegas family of video editors (formerly from Sony, now owned by MAGIX). I have the most experience with Vegas Pro, their higher-end video editor, but they also offer a consumer-end video editor called Vegas Movie Studio, which works exactly the same as Vegas Pro, but with fewer features and a much better price. Vegas Movie Studio is a multitrack ...


11

Freemake is a good looking, powerful video converter. It is a quality alternative to paid products. Online installer Offline installer


10

Since you did not specify an operating system, I'm assuming you're talking about Microsoft Windows. The first thing that comes to mind is Virtualdub, as I have used it myself for exactly the same purpose. Virtualdub may lack the editing power of a general-purpose editor such as Adobe Premiere or Sony Vegas, but it is streamlined for fast linear operations ...


10

You can use FFmpeg: Free, open-source and widely used Supports most video formats Runs on Windows, Linux and Mac. Allows to cut: Running ffmpeg two times: ffmpeg -i input.avi -vcodec copy -acodec copy -t 00:30:00 output1.avi ffmpeg -i input.avi -vcodec copy -acodec copy -ss 00:30:00 -t 00:45:00 output2.avi Or in one command: ffmpeg -i input.avi -vcodec ...


10

This is one of the dreams of many many people and currently a perfect solution is not publicly available. However it can still be done with a bit of messy work. One method which will work if a) the video is okay to be public for a few minutes and b) Youtube's auto-captioning will work is to upload to Youtube, get Youtube to auto-caption and then use KeepSubs ...


10

You could extract one image every X seconds, which you can do using FFmpeg (free, open-source, Windows, Mac and Linux) with the command ffmpeg -i input.mov -r 0.25 output_%04d.png to get a picture every four (4=1/0.25) seconds. (Then you might want to create a video slideshow based on those pictures)


9

The default VLC media player should be able to play and record YouTube videos by itself. The steps are as follows: Go to Views > Advanced Controls Go to Media > Open Network Stream Put the YouTube video URL in the box It should stream. To record, just click on the record button on the bottom left corner Recorded videos should be available in your ...


9

You can use FFmpeg: Free and open-source Runs on Windows, Mac and Linux Allows to split video into pictures: e.g. ffmpeg -i input.mov -r 0.25 output_%04d.png to get a picture every four seconds. Is CLI so you can batch. Supports most of the video formats. Other ideas.


9

With VLC you can slow down the file, but it isn't really frame-by-frame. OpenShot is a pretty lightweight (and very useful) video editor, which can show frame-by-frame. You can use the left and right arrows to navigate frame-by-frame backwards or forwards in time. You can also get a live DVD (or USB) with it on here: http://www.bandshed.net/AVLinux.html ...


8

Youtube Center is one of the best as it integrates perfectly into the site and gives you a lot of other options to customize your viewing experience. It appends an extra set of options to each video including a download button, you can even only request audio. It's available for all major browsers as extensions or if you can install it via a userscript.


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