19

I would suggest using the command line and ffmpeg as in: ffmpeg -ss start_time -i input_file .ext -t duration -vcodec copy -acodec copy output_file .ext .ext must be a supported video type and the same in both cases note there should be no space between the name and .ext it is only there above to get the bold and italic to work. -ss should be before the ...


15

You can use FFmpeg: Free and open-source Runs on Windows Allows to trim: e.g. to cut the first 2 seconds: ffmpeg -ss 2 -i input.flv -vcodec copy -acodec copy output.flv Is CLI so you can batch.


12

Blender (free) has a powerful built-in video editor that's pretty straightforward to use. You load content in as strips and then you can adjust these on the timeline, it has a real-time preview window and also has effects that you can overlay on your video. Minus the couple minutes that it would take you to learn the ins and outs, it performs all you ask. ...


11

I like the Vegas family of video editors (formerly from Sony, now owned by MAGIX). I have the most experience with Vegas Pro, their higher-end video editor, but they also offer a consumer-end video editor called Vegas Movie Studio, which works exactly the same as Vegas Pro, but with fewer features and a much better price. Vegas Movie Studio is a multitrack ...


11

I have recommended Virtual Dub on another question asking for a tool for efficiently cutting movies. Virtual Dub meets each of the requirements specified but how it handles images is a little... different. Virtual Dub effortlessly provides the following functionality: trimming video clips combining multiple clips previewing the video before exporting it ...


10

If you prefer using a CLI, you can use FFmpeg: Free and open-source Runs on Windows Allows to crop: ffmpeg -i in.mp4 -filter:v "crop=out_w:out_h:x:y" out.mp4 Is CLI so you can batch.


8

Any decent video editor would have this feature. E.g. you can use VirtualDub: Free and open-source Runs on Windows Has a GUI. Can crop


7

I think Windows Movie Maker can accomplish what you want. It can: Trim clips. Add Transitions and visual effects. Combine clips. Provides a good preview feature Easy uploading to cloud services, including YouTube, Facebook and SkyDrive. More... Unfortunately, I haven't figured out how to add clips on top of other clips yet (i.e. overlays), so ...


7

Subtitle Workshop is a great software that I used. I do not check its latest versions though. It supports any kind of subtitle adjustment, smart line adjusting etc. It had an integrated video player so you can add-edit-adjust-check at the same time on the same window. Also it supports many subtitles formats, nearly all formats hat are used. But it does not ...


7

You can use FFmpeg: Free and open-source Runs on Windows Can convert to most types of video format. Fast. Is CLI.


7

You can use Avidemux: free and open source Windows/Linux/Mac GUI allows to view each frame and delete a group of them by selection compatible with major video formats (usually no need to install any additional codec)


7

I rarely do video editing, but in the past used OpenShot. The "learning curve" is pretty low (compared to Cinerella), and it nicely integrates with Blender and other tools. OpenShot screenshot (source: OpenShot; click image for larger variant – and the link for more screenshots) Other than your experience, OpenShot never crashed on me. It ran smooth and ...


7

I recently came across Shotcut. It runs on Linux and it is based on the same backend as OpenShot: the MLT toolkit. It is opensource and crossplatform.


7

VLC media player can convert and merge video files. Steps: Select File > Open Muliple Files Add the required files by clicking the add button From the dropdown menu below choose convert. Select the output format. Add a destination file name and click start


6

Currently the best video converter is Handbrake. http://handbrake.fr/ It is a GUI program with a very simple workflow, usually takes next to no time to setup a file convertion. Has several presets ready for fast action. Does batch conversion. Has some automation (move or rename files after conversion, etc). The latest beta supports Intel Quick Sync, so it ...


6

You can use Avidemux: freeware / open-source cross-platform can also be used for cutting, encoding videos compatible with many formats After you install it, open the video file, then go to Video - Filters and choose what you want. It also has preview. Here is an example: And the filter options:


6

How about PiTiVi? It's a Free Software video editor based on GStreamer. It's written in Python and should run on windows, although I wouldn't expect it to run as well there. Have a look at the manual to see whether it fits your needs. oh, they also have a fundraiser running.


6

Kdenlive can synchronize videos using a audio reference. Select the track you want to use as the audio reference, press the right mouse button, and select Set Audio Reference. Then select the track you want to aligned to the reference, press the right mouse button and select Align Audio to Reference.


6

I would check out Filmora by WonderShare. It has a lot of features and still easy to use. It is able to run on Windows 7 and runs quickly for what it does. It can crop videos, mesh them together, and import a large variety of video formats. Currently it's priced at $19 per year or $39 for life but there is a trial version.


6

What you're looking for is AviDemux. AviDemux is an open-source GUI video processing software made in Linux which also has releases for Windows (x86 and x64), it also has a command-line version called avidemux_cli.exe which comes inside the package. It can perform re-conversion of various formats and also it can perform copy/cut/paste operations with no re-...


5

As normal on any video editing question that is not highly specific I'll recommend my favourite: AviDemux. It is not the most intuitive but it has pretty good docs. It is: Open Source (and free) Cross platform (though I have personally only used it on Windows - XP through 8) Encoding in different formats is fairly simple. It can open and encode in a lot ...


5

Faststone capture can work for this purpose, although it is not primarily meant for it and doesn't run on linux. Primarily Faststone capture is designed to capture screenshots and record the screen. After doing this you can edit the captured image or recording and this is where it can work as a video annotation tool as well. In the (tiny) menu bar that the ...


5

I simply use YouTube: I upload the video privately,apply stabilization and download it once it is processed. It's free and online, but they re-encode the video and the max resolution is 1080p.


5

Here are a list of some free and commercial video editors - Pinnacle Video Spin (Free, I used it much often, easy to use) Sony Vegas Pro (Not free) ArcSoft ShowBiz (Commercial trial) Camtasia Studio (Commercial Trial, has necessary functions) WonderShare Video Editor (Commercial trial) Virtual Dub (Free)


5

A very powerful one DaVinci Resolve Free edition. This one needs a modern graphics card. A really interesting option is HitFilm express. It is not only an editor but also a compositor. Avid is also a well-known developer on the industry and it has a free version, Media Composer First Another interesting program is VSDC. It has a logic a bit different ...


5

XMediaRecode will do this for you. It is a video and audio transcoding program that works on Windows. It also supports a lot of different file types such as WMV, MP4, MP3, 3GP, Matroska and more. Additionally it has a GUI and is Freeware.


5

Blender is a free and open-source 3D editing and includes a fully featured video editor. Note: Blender doesn't have the best learning curve, and might be a little difficult to use in the beginning, but it has a lot of tutorials and if you are stuck at something small, it is pretty easy to find tutorials for your problem. To use Blender as a video editor, ...


4

I just answered a question on screen recording, went on to browse the rest of this site and found this question. Though I guess it's not meant for video editing (I'd prefer Sony Vegas, but that's not free), ActivePresenter should also be able to fulfill most of the requirements. First up, though: how to get started. Normally in ActivePresenter, you get ...


4

Both Adobe Premier Pro and After Effects have "Warp Stabilizer" effect with various settings. Importing GIFs may be tricky. I resolved this by first splitting the GIF into a sequence of separate frames using Photoshop and import them as video in AE.


4

I use Virtual Dub for this kind of work - specifically in my instance re-encoding videos recorded using FRAPS of me playing games after appending each of the files into a single stream and cutting out the various parts of the video(s) I no longer need. It doesn't have the best user interface I've seen but it certainly gets the job done and has enough ...


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