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A dedicated editor for web dev is Adobe Brackets, an awesome piece of open-source software. Here's some features it has you won't find in other editors: Live preview: You can set it up so that when you make a change in the editor, the change will appear immediately in the browser Quick edit: You can access the CSS styles affecting an element by simply ...


6

XPontus: Doesn't quite meet 100% but probably as close as you'll get without shelling out currently; and OS so could be extended at some point to fully match. Certainly does match that cheaper - since it is free. XML grid view: hmm not 100% sure what you mean by that but I there is a tree view which I think is what you're meaning (I have limited experience ...


4

My ultimate favorite IDE = Netbeans Customized Theme: Basic Theme: It's very plain, the more you use it, the more you learn it. Just hit open and open you html files, or drag&drop them from your desktop and you ready to code. Or, start coding right and put your files in a project and let Netbeans handle it for you. Moreover, the editor is ...


3

Tweakstyle is a relatively new entry in the HTML code editor. It is currently in beta but has a good amount of features. Uses chrome web tools in the preview pane so you can inspect an element and edit matching rules. It has a preview pane that updates when you save your HTML file. It provides live updates when you change your CSS. When you open a HTML ...


3

You can use Sublime Text editor, with W3C Validator Plugin. Sublime is paid but you can use the trial version without limits. But I would recommend you to buy as its an awesome editor, trust me... I'll provide a walk through of how this will work.. Open Sublime Editor, install Package Control(If you haven't) Now install the W3C Validator Plugin using the ...


3

Take a look at csvkit, a python library for working with CSV data with accompanying command line scripts. It's designed to be smart about character encoding (and can be used to convert or normalize your encodings), and since it uses Python's csv module, it's pretty reliable in terms of reading and writing according to spec. It's designed with UNIX ...


3

It's somewhat unclear how far your requirements stretch, but in general most scripting languages have a CSV parser of their own, and can be used from the command line. If there's an error in your CSV file, a parser should find it. For example: echo "one, two" | ruby -r csv -e 'CSV.parse(STDIN.read)' results in the script producing no output and an exit ...


2

You could use the bash itself to write a good validator for CSV file. You can refer to this previous post. It explains how to use "awk" command to realize a validator for fields and for the file itself


2

This isn't exactly what you're after but feel free to modify as needed (I just whipped it up). http://jsfiddle.net/wq7tjec7/14/ If you enter a date string in the input field in the bottom right box and press Test it will attempt to validate your date. Valid Dates should pass and indicate such, but invalid dates like: 2015-13-05T12:35:45Z should fail ...


2

Without the need for a specific application, if you just want to separate the wheat from the chaff, and have PHP installed on the Linux machine, you can use a simple one-liner for this: for json in folder/*; do php -r "if ( ! \$foo=json_decode(file_get_contents('$json')) ) echo \"$json\n\";"; done This would list all broken .json files in the directory ...


2

If you would like to invest some time and disk space the definitive validator is the W3C online validator. You can however also download a snapshot of the validator and run it yourself offline, you will need an instance of Apache Web server, Perl, some Perl libraries and the validator itself. This guide explains how to install and run your own validator ...


2

Pandas can do a lot of the work for you and is well worth looking at. Reading .csv files, (also .xlsx & others) Format conversions for date & value columns Filtering Are all available.


1

As others have pointed out, my program sql-lint will do what you need. It is open source, completely free and in active development. Linting a query is as simple as: echo "DELETE FROM person;" | sql-lint It will bring back errors from the SQL server and its own built-in ones. Hope that helps, and good luck!


1

As a GitHub-round developer, IMO, "checking CSV/TSV" is a task too specific to make a dedicated app useful, and that's why there isn't a ready-for-use one. I would instead propose that you just use Travis CI or CircleCI, and write a CI config that runs some other command-line validator tool (you can even write one yourself with regular expressions), and ...


1

Formvalidation.io is quite good. And if the project gets commercial it won't be too expensive to use it. But anyway, I would like to provide you an good openSource alternative. You can try to use jqBootstrapValidation too. It's free of charge and can be downloaded on GitHub. It's published under MIT, you need to be sure that this license matches your ...


1

Here are a few: jsFiddlePlayer Opens jsFiddle output to a single unified html page in a new window or tab with one click from the Omnibox. jsFiddle is awesome, but sometimes you want to combine all your HTML, CSS & JS into a single HTML file (perhaps to save it to your local disk). jsFiddle Player does that, it simply adds a "play" button to the ...


1

mdast-lint https://github.com/wooorm/mdast-lint has come out, and it looks like a serious possibility. You can configure it both per repository, and globally, and it covers many of the style guide points I wanted in my style guide.


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I already answered here suggesting Atom, anyway if you are a beginner (and even if you are not) you may also like a wysiwyg editor. The acronym "wysiwyg" stands for "what you see is what you get", in general a wysiwig editor lets you view something very similar to the end result since the document creation and implies the ability to directly manipulate the ...


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