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22

Yes. In fact there is something better than "the original". After Google Reader turned out the lights, I experimented with a long string or RSS readers and aggregation systems. I eventually settled on Feedly and tried to camp out there. While the interface is polished and it does most things well, after a couple weeks I was frustrated with how little ...


12

If you don't mind running your own (or can find a instance of it yourself ) tt-rss is a great RSS feed reader. After having google reader, and then another alternative I tried closed down, running my own seemed the best way to ensure I'd have a RSS feed reader I could rely on ads? What ads, you're running it yourself Categorization: as much as you'd like ...


11

Feedly should do perfectly. See also a (slightly outdated) tutorial and Advertising: utterly minimal; recommended feed on some pages (don't actually know if those are algorithmic or algorithmic and paid advertising) Categorization: yep to your heart's content (with custom views definable for each category). Updating: Not instant in most cases; around 25% ...


10

Feedbin Nice, minimal theme with good typography, with some options to change fonts and day/night themes. (Also has a nice mobile interface, if I do say so myself..) Ability to tag feeds. You can also run searches, and save searches as new meta-tags. The API is supported by the two big reading apps: Reeder (iOS) and Press (Android), along with various ...


5

Other than the OS X requirement, deadbeef sounds like a good option - it's basically an attempt to build a foobar clone for linux. It dosen't run on OS X but it does have a plugin system, last.fm support, customisable columns and cue support. It has some DSP supports and plugins, but nowhere near as mature as foobar2000, and you'll likely need to test it to ...


5

There are two options I'm aware of that will work natively under Windows: FontForge is the obvious suggestion. It helps that it is cross-platform. One screen-shot: Softy is a very old piece of software (shareware), but again, depending on the platform, it might continue to be useful. I used it quite a bit many years ago, and it was great for tweaking TTF ...


4

As answered on askubuntu you could run some Python code. # To encode: python -c "import urllib, sys; print urllib.quote(sys.argv[1])" "String to encode" # To decode: python -c "import urllib, sys; print urllib.unquote(sys.argv[1])" "String%20to%20encode" # Or if you have Python 3.x installed you could use these: python3 -c "from urllib.parse import quote, ...


4

Though it's not working via Unicode Sequences as you describe, I'd strongly recommend wincompose: it uses the same compose sequences as there are available natively on Linux, and they are much more intuitive. What's available you can look up in the text file /usr/share/X11/locale/en_US.UTF-8/Compose on your Linux machine – or via a GUI (including filtering ...


3

Finally a solution exists, its name is AutoHotkey. I wrote myself an AutoHotkey script like below. You have just to release Ctrl (and on US keyboard layouts or on numpads also Shift) after pressing "u" and finally press Ctrl again to insert the character: ^+u:: SendInput, u Input, num, V L5,{LControl}{RControl} SetFormat, IntegerFast, Hex ...


3

Rather than trying to find an IDE or editor that allows different projects/files to use different fonts while not try to find and use a Mono Spaced font that covers all of your required languages. While not the prettiest font that I know you can always download and install Unifont and set that as your code editor front in any code editor that has UTF-8 ...


3

SwarmIQ We have a free and a premium tier: Free (no Ads): Support for upto 200 RSS Feeds, Folders, Tags, Starring, Interests (bundles of related RSS feeds) Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter integrations for sharing Social features to share with and follow other people using SwarmIQ Keyboard shortcuts App dashboard to control what features you want to see in ...


2

Font Creator. It allows more than 2,000 composite glyphs as well as import images (GIF, PNG, BMP, etc.) and vector files (PDF, AI, EPS, etc).


2

As far as I understand, you want to interactively type in said data at the prompt, while your Python script is running. (Otherwise, the most-likely already-installed Windows PowerShell ISE would have sufficed.) Take a look at Dreampie - it is UTF-8-enabled, both in interactive and scripting mode. Although you didn't specify the Python version you are using, ...


2

You can get more or less what you need using python and its unicodedata module - something like: import unicodedata as ucd u = u'The UK uses £ but Japan ¥' for c in u: print c, "%04x" % ord(c), ucd.category(c), ucd.name(c) produces: T 0054 Lu LATIN CAPITAL LETTER T h 0068 Ll LATIN SMALL LETTER H e 0065 Ll LATIN SMALL LETTER E 0020 Zs SPACE U 0055 Lu ...


2

You can easily change the presentation by piping the output of unicode into a bit of text rewriting. To get the same presentation as the UniView web app: unicode -s 'Oh, hai' | perl -000 -ne '/^U+(.*)\n.*\n(.)/ and print "$2 $1\n"' Alternatively, you could type your text in an editor with good editor support. For example, in Emacs, press C-u C-x = (command ...


2

Not a package, but two simple functions that may already do what you want to achieve: import unicodedata def InsertUnicodeCharNames(inputstring): result = "" for ch in inputstring: if ord(ch) > 127: result += TrimSign(unicodedata.name(ch)).lower() else: result += ch return result # remove trailing ...


2

Uniview can show characters as a graphic, hence it will work regardless of fonts installed on your system (as the browser needs the fonts too to display characters as characters and not images)


2

Windows support this for as long as I remember, but you need to enable it in registry with: reg add "HKCU\Control Panel\Input Method" /v EnableHexNumpad /t REG_SZ /d 1 Then you can type µ with Alt + + + 0 0 b 5 ሴ with Alt + + + 1 2 3 4 etc.


1

I found out that there is some way how to work with Unicode keyboard shortcuts in Microsoft Office. If I write Unicode code (e.g. "00b5") and press Alt + X, the code changes to micro letter (µ) elegantly. I hope there is some overall solution, but this approach works too.


1

Give the CudaText a try. Free, open source For MacOS, Linux, Windows Supports binary files, via showing non-text chars like "x00" for 0-char, and keeps these chars on saving correctly


1

first of all i have to say vCard (.vcf) is the standard for exchanging/storing contact-information and if somehow possible you should stay with it for data-consistency! export your contacts from the phone to a vcf-file (if your vendor spent your rom a crippled contact-app use Export Contacts). transfer the file to a computer and import it to your preferred ...


1

Implemented myself: https://gist.github.com/vi/2d6b268cc243c138358f3d1b88120ff5 $ formatunicode '-Check- Test of ^the^ _tool_' C̶h̶e̶c̶k̶ Test of t̅h̅e̅ t̲o̲o̲l̲ One may need to add additional temporary letters or spaces to workaround non-recognition of patterns. If one needs reverse transformation, post a comment.


1

Emacs configures its fonts through fontsets. 'nough said? Emacs comes with a sample file called HELLO that contains the word “hello” in some common scripts. You can display it with C-h h (press Ctrl+H then H). Even those are often not all provided by the same font. You can run M-x describe-fontset (Alt+X describe-fontset Enter) to see what fonts are used ...


1

You can use HTTrack Website Copier for this. You can download it from This link.


1

Not a library as such, but I wrote some UTF-8 functions for my own C projects, which you can find here in the unicode.h and unicode.c files. They use the MIT licence so you can basically do whatever you want with them.


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