2

I am not sure about what you mean with «based on Ubuntu». A desktop environment either runs on Ubuntu or it doesn't. Also, «the best desktop environment» is clearly a matter of opinion, therefore I will focus only on your bullet points. Touch-friendly buttons Cursor disappears when using touch input but shows where it was pressed Ubuntu already ...


2

You need to set "Show the on-screen keyboard when the text cursor is visible" option, or Show/Hide via commands: https://hot-virtual-keyboard.com/help-online/#settings-show-hide https://hot-virtual-keyboard.com/development/q1/


2

It will be tough to meet all your requirements with Linux. You don't specify the tablet, but the description implies that it has very limited resources. Assuming that's the case, it will be an uphill battle to fit a regular distro that supports all your needs. Are you experienced with Linux? It will make a huge difference whether you're a Linux newbie or ...


2

First of all, you might want to check for support of your UEFI/CPU. I used to own a Asus T200TA and the support for Linux was really not great (It wouldn't even fully install because of supporting only 32-bit uefi and other problems like theses) so I'm not sure support has really evolved. There are not a lot of distributions that will check all of your ...


1

I had the same problem with ComicRack. It frustrated me to hell that I couldn't get the touchscreen functionality to work, but then I reviewed the ComicRack manual and learned what the "gestures" are. See attached image. "Gesture 3," which is set for "next page" is a small square area in the top right corner of the screen just ...


1

You can make the built-in on-screen keyboard appear automatically by going to Settings (Windows + I), click on Devices then select Typing from the list on the left then turn on "Automatically show the touch keyboard in windowed apps when there's no keyboard attached to your device". See this link for details. It is also possible to pin an icon to start the ...


1

As mentioned in my other answer, many physics simulations are programmed in order to perform specifically the task expected for the tutorial. A contributor of Khan Academy, 3Blue1Brown, answers in his FAQ that he uses Python and the Manim library to animate math tutorials. You could combine that with a physics library like Pymunk.


1

It's a bit unclear, how many different simulations you need and whether you want to create your own ones or not. Creating own simulations can be a time consuming task, since you need to define which parameters shall be included in the simulation or not. That could be: friction, often neglected for educational purposes temperature air pressure humidity That ...


1

Xodo fulfills the requirements; it supports: zoom two-pages horizontal scrolling (which matches reading from a magazine) is touch based. It has some minor rough edges (my major complaint being not supporting automatic vertical fit), but does the job well.


1

I got it. Wukong remote and Wukong input perfectly resolves my problem. I have searched tons of remote bluetooth and wifi mouse and keyboard apps, whose server are all built for windows, Mac, or Linux. Wukong is the only one whose server is built for android system, such as smart TV and projector. However, I do not think Wukong input is the exact name ...


1

I found a solution. The Touchpal keyboard can be resized in any direction. This can be achieved by opening the application, going to General settings, then Keyboard appearance and then resizing as needed. A further problem I faced was that I could not resize as it would require the use of the dead area of the touchscreen. I overcame this by using TeamViewer ...


1

A look into my list of apps for Keyboards & Input Methods should give you something to select from. Though I've never heard of any providing you with the option to define "offsets", there are some with "bigger keys" available: Big Buttons Keyboard was already mentioned in the comments. As its name suggests, it features bigger buttons ...


1

Since so much of your expectations are subjective I would suggest downloading a number of distros with live images, using a tool such as liveusb creator or LinuxLive USB Creator to create a bootable USB and giving them a try by booting into them. Most will be slower running from USB but you can: See if all your hardware is supported out of the box Get a ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible