12

I used to recommend Kate as the editor to use ... until it stopped working correctly in non-KDE environments (missing icons, etc) Now I cheerfully recommend Geany - https://www.geany.org/Download/Releases Does all you want, has a terminal option to work in as well, can actually be set up to compile/build your source, etc. More like a super light weight ...


11

You may try Sublime Text. It has all the features listed by you. The UI is modern and quite fast, and supports mouse + configurable keyboard shortcuts: As well it includes other features: "Goto Anything," quick navigation to files, symbols, or lines "Command palette" uses adaptive matching for quick keyboard invocation of arbitrary commands Plugin API and ...


9

After a few days of trying and surveying desktop searching alternatives, although not mentioned on Wikipedia I found the Regain opensource project which shares most of the Google Desktop Search options and is also opensource and still in development (full features list here). Short Description Regain is a Java search engine based on Jakarta Lucene. It ...


8

Vim While the UI is pretty old school, there is a reason it is still popular a quarter century after it's creation; it's awesome. Here is an article that walks through how to install most of the features you need. ✓ Lightweight :: Very lightweight ✗ Modern GUI :: Unless late 20th Century counts as modern... ✓ Gratis :: Donations go to help children in ...


7

You can also try ElasticSearch. ElasticSearch it's a search server on top of Lucene. It provides a Json API for performing the search queries and it's really handy when it comes to scalability. In order to to index an existing database you should continually poll it's content. Here is a tutorial for that. On the downside, you should be familiar with ...


7

XPontus: Doesn't quite meet 100% but probably as close as you'll get without shelling out currently; and OS so could be extended at some point to fully match. Certainly does match that cheaper - since it is free. XML grid view: hmm not 100% sure what you mean by that but I there is a tree view which I think is what you're meaning (I have limited experience ...


5

Solr might be a good fit for your choice. As ElasticSearch, Solr is based on Lucene and provides the same functionalities like full-text search, hit highlighting and easy-scalability among others. Generally when searching for those 2 solutions you will find many resources. I leave it to you to decide which one to use ;) Solr has definitely the advantage ...


5

Well, you said the 3 magic words: database, text-search and Java. I would strongly suggest using Hibernate-Search because it's made for this purpose. To be more precise, Hibernate-Search has the ability to: Add text-search in your existing database by annotations in your existing entities. find by approximation (fuzzy search) and rank results. It's Lucene ...


5

Take a look at GitHub Atom Free, Gratis & Open Source Supports Syntax Highlighting most languages out of the box and can be customised for more Hex Viewer as a plug in module Small & Lightweight (by modern standards) >100 MB setup on my machine Multi-tab and multipane Regexp Search Auto complete Auto save Can be set up as portable on some systems. ...


4

I have done all of those things that you require using NSIS. It is a scriptable installer generator for Windows, but it can be scripted to be used for any purpose really. The strong points of this installer is that it is very efficient, small size, very portable across Windows versions, tons of plugins for any purpose you can think of. The weak point that I ...


4

Regex Search Regex search is a Chrome extension to search webpages by regular expressions. To use it based on your requirement just separate the words by the "or" character, |. The dot . can be used as a wild card. Features: Search and highlight multiple words / phrases Words don't have to be in succession Is a Chrome extension Is free and open-...


4

Semantic Designs' Source Code Search Engine (SCSE) uses language specific scanners to break each source file into its constituent lexemes, indexes everything, and then provides a GUI-based search across the code base in terms of language elements. This has the advantage of ignoring (language-specific) whitespace and comments in searches except where you ...


4

As you're on linux and using grep/find already, let's pipe them to xargs and use it's concurrency option to speed things up. It'll depend on how much compute you have on your machine but should be quicker. For example, you're probably doing something similar to: grep -i "<string>" /dir/path Pipe the command to xargs and use the -n to state how many ...


4

I don't have any experience converting outlook's PST files, but if you can get those emails into maildir format, there is an excellent tool called notmuch which seems to do exactly what you are asking. It will index your mail and allow you to quickly search through it. There are several front ends and clients designed to work with it as well. Read about it ...


4

It probably doesn't match a hipster definition of "modern", but I suggest you eventually learn to use good old VIM or Emacs. There is a reason why they are still extremely popular. They have multiple buffers, macros, folding, syntax highlighting for the most absurd languages (syntax highlighting for mutt config files? sure!), keyboard shortcuts to increment ...


4

I am looking for a program that can find the longest line of a .txt file. It should run on Microsoft Windows. I've listed two FREE solutions below that may suffice for your need. Method 1 You could use: wc -L "c:\folder\file.txt" from the CoreUtils for Windows for example if you just need the number of the length of the longest line in that file. ...


3

Notepad++ has a plugin that compares two files and colors the differences. You also get a + sign next to lines present in 1 file only and >>> sign next to altered lines. You can cycle through the differences using "next" and "previous" commands.


3

I tend to use Agent Ransack for this. Free Microsoft Windows XP (SP3)/2003/Vista/2008/7/2012/8/8.1 Supports regular expressions on file name and query text Preview matching line from files within search window Options to export results, and save search criteria Screenshot


3

I use grep. As I store all my code under the same path on my filesystem I open up my linux shell (but that will work via cygwin on windows as well) and cd to the directory. Grep is a very sophisticated text search tool that can search for all kinds of text and has no limit to what you want to look for. Your =~ would be searched like this: grep -r "=~" . ...


3

You can try Lookeen. Since Version 10 it is a pure desktop search and has a free "lite" version. Disclaimer: I’m a part of the company that developed Lookeen.


3

Take a look at Scite (which comes with most Linux distris' repositories): multiple files open in tabs: Check. syntax highlighting for most languages: Check. toggle comment for most languages: Check. regex find and replace: Check. reload prompt if the file has been modified outside the program: Not out-of-the-box (unsure if it has it, couldn't find it yet). ...


3

You can try out Notepadqq, which is an unofficial port of the original Notepad++ to Linux. Please be warned that it is incomplete, so some of the features you expect may be missing. Based on a quick look at the version of Notepadqq I have, most of the features on your list appear to be available, except for the hex editor and autosave.


3

I've actually had good luck with grepWIN for this purpose. It processes folders recursively, does multiline search and replace, can filter by file extension, do plain text or regex, and has a fairly verbose output that displays files found as well as locations in the files where the matches are. It's one of my "first installs" for a clean machine. ...


2

I used to use Recoll and it was very neat: http://www.lesbonscomptes.com/recoll/ It uses poppler, the well-known PDF library. Modern OS often have such search features by default, for instance Fedora provides Nepomuk. They can be very resource-intensive, though.


2

Alfresco fits the requirements: It includes Solr, and full-text search works out-of-the-box. Apache Tika is also included out-of-the-box, so metadata is extracted from most file formats. Alfresco of course performs versioning, and is multi-user. I use it everyday to collaborate with my colleagues. You can use Alfresco either via its UI or via any of the ...


2

FINDSTR Windows command terminal has a FINDSTR command which you can use to search for a string in a set of files. There's some documentation which I regularly refer to when I need to use it. Criteria Matches: Since it's from MS-DOS, I assume it doesn't use or create an index; it certainly doesn't get any faster if I run the same search over and over. It ...


2

They say that Abbyy FineReader Pro is the leader of the pack. Otherwise, two things: • You get what you pay for • It is a good idea to run tests on your documents


2

Sonar Secrets is a plugin to SonarQube. It can recognize passwords, API keys, AWS credentials, tokens, etc. from source code. You can read a nice introduction to it in https://medium.com/@SkyscannerEng/introducing-sonar-secrets-32e36e1bbc97


2

You can use text-editors SynWrite / CudaText for this. They are gratis, and CT is cross-platform. For SynWrite just call command "Search - Find/replace in files". For CudaText need to install plugin and call it. In "Plugins - Addon Manager" install plugin "Find in Files". Example view of dialog (on Linux):


2

I'm going to recommend AstroGrep which has a very similar layout to the Google Snippet view. It supports plain text files. It is based of the UNIX utility "grep" and is completely free to use. It also contains a numerous amount of options as well for searching. AstroGrep (free) AstroGrep is a Microsoft Windows grep utility. Grep is a UNIX command-line ...


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