20

Pandoc (License: GPL) can import: markdown reStructuredText textile HTML DocBook LaTeX MediaWiki markup OPML Haddock markup and convert to these and various other formats. (Custom formats can be added with Lua.) It’s a standalone command-line program and comes with a Haskell library. You can test it online: http://johnmacfarlane.net/pandoc/try/


11

I think you are talking about EULAlyzer. It was done by JavaCoolSoftware up to some time ago, now BrightFort LLC. It has some analysis tools that helps you to identify weird clauses about third parties, data collection, advertising, etc. I have used it and didn't gave me trouble finding stuff in lengthy text nor unexpected behaviors. It comes as freeware ...


6

With txt2tags (https://txt2tags.org/), you can export to at least 20 different formats, including rtf (rich text format), latex, html, wikipedia, creole, dokuwiki, restructured text, markdown, spip, AsciiDoc... There is an html importer for txt2tags (https://wiki.txt2tags.org/index.php/Main/Html2wiki) so you can do pretty everything with it. (edit) To be ...


5

Apache Tika can do that for 18 languages: Danish, German, Estonian, Greek, English, Spanish, Finnish, French, Hungarian, Icelandic, Italian, Dutch, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, Swedish and Thai the command on linux would be: java -jar tika-app-1.18.jar -l filetodetect > detectedlangfile 2>/dev/null


4

There is a chance, that Sublime is suitable for your task, but with several prerequisites: You should disable plugins such as syntax highlighting, bracket matcher or git gutter, i.e. any plugin that applies regexes to the edited text. Otherwise memory/CPU requrements will be unexpectedly high. The file must accept being split into lines. Good example: a log ...


3

If you need a software to draw texts on pictures I recommend you the free yet powerful Image Editor Gimp in which you can draw texts on your pictures beside its many other features. You can download it for Windows, OSX or Linux. Tutorial for adding outline effect on text can be found here. If you ever need an online free tool for putting text (captions) in ...


3

I think PureText mostly fits the bill. It does not replace the default paste functions but I quickly got used to using it's default of Win+V. Gave me the freedom to keep Ctrl+V should I want to retain the formatting. Using it like that negates the automatic mode requirement I suggest. It is however not cross platform.


3

By looking at this Wikipedia page, I can see there aren't too many free alternatives for Linux. In fact you've already tried all WYSIWYG DTP software (excepting LyX). You say you weren't happy with Scribus. Well, it has a lot of options but some are hidden in that interface. Paragraph borders are not missing in Scribus. Draw a text frame T, write some text ...


3

The windows command: tree /A /F > temp.txt gets very close to what you are asking for. | temp.txt | +---build | __init__.py | +---lib | | activex.py | | activexwrapper.py | | anchors.py | | busy.py | | buttonpanel.py | | buttons.py | | calendar.py | | CDate.py | | ClickableHtmlWindow.py | | ...


2

As far as I am aware, Windows 7 Explorer has all the basic features you need, and some of the optional features as well. You can index a file directory in Windows (7+) in two ways. Directly index the directory, or make it a library. Direct Index: See here: wikiHow: How to Add a Folder to the Windows 7 File Index Create Library: In Explorer, go to "...


2

Regain (desktop search)   You can find a list of desktop search managers on Wikipedia but I find the Regain opensource project as being a sensible choice, beside that is free(as in libre) and also opensource and still in development which means new features will appear(full features list here). Short Description Regain is a Java search engine based on ...


2

What you describe can be done with OpenCV and python as demonstrated here and Adrian's imutils, the rest of the blog posts are worth a read as well. (Note that the code in the blog post makes use of code from an earlier blog post https://pyimagesearch.com/2014/08/25/… looking at it it uses a directory called pyimagesearch with a file called transform.py - ...


2

GnuWin is able to do it, e.g. sed. At the command line, type for %f in ("*.txt") do C:\...\sed -i "1,3!d" "%f" The for command is part of the Windows command line. %f defines a variable to hold the file name. in ("*.txt") defines which files to process. do C:\...\sed tells Windows to run a command. -i will perform in-place operation, i.e. write to the ...


2

Since you already know some python you could take a look at the Natural Language Toolkit - nltk - it has a large suite of tools and the ability to customise most of them. Of your requirements: Input text - of course Gloss/tag/markup (preferably through a context menu as opposed to actual XML-like tags) text so that I can categorize it by rhetorical/...


2

I suggest taking a look at the python Natural Language Toolkit, nltk, you will need to install python first if your platform doesn't come with it, i.e. MS-Windows but it is available for most platforms. The advantage is that rather than simply splitting the sentence into words and shuffling them - hoping for a meaningful result - which you can do in about ...


2

I would suggest looking at Python and Scrapy. Python with it's standard libraries includes lots of very powerful text processing tools including regular expressions but scrapy takes it a lot further. From the web site: Built-in support for selecting and extracting data from HTML and XML sources Built-in support for cleaning and sanitizing the scraped ...


2

A script to do it with AutoHotkey (scripting language for desktop automation on Windows), in case it's ok not to be browser only: CTL+ALT+k - Sentence case (what you asked for) CTL+L - convert to lowercase CTL+U - convert to uppercase CTL+K - invert the case (e.g. "The Big Dog" becomes "tHE bIG dOG") SHIFT+CTL+K - convert to capitalized (e.g. "the big dog" ...


2

You can use text-editors SynWrite / CudaText for this. They are gratis, and CT is cross-platform. For SynWrite just call command "Search - Find/replace in files". For CudaText need to install plugin and call it. In "Plugins - Addon Manager" install plugin "Find in Files". Example view of dialog (on Linux):


2

Not a package, but two simple functions that may already do what you want to achieve: import unicodedata def InsertUnicodeCharNames(inputstring): result = "" for ch in inputstring: if ord(ch) > 127: result += TrimSign(unicodedata.name(ch)).lower() else: result += ch return result # remove trailing ...


2

I recommend Boostnote. Boostnote is an Open source note-taking app for programmers. It focuses on writing Markdown note and code snippet quickly, can organized in a better way. You can sync data to multi-devices(Mac, Windows, Linux, Android and iOS) via Dropbox. ■ Download https://boostnote.io


2

The python Natural Language Toolkit, NTLK and optionally SciKit-Learn libraries fit your bill admirably: Gratis & Open Source easy to use - With a little background reading Well documnented - Yes but always open to suggestions/improvements there is even an excellent book Examples and Tutorials - Yes lots online Accessible in python - they are python ...


2

A Mac/Linux/Windows specific software might exist, but I wrote my own PHP script to get all the data out of the hOCR file into a database, and from there I can create whatever format I want with the data. hOCR should be xhtml already. The php script below reads the hOCR data file (produced by Tesseract OCR) word by word (with word data, like page, line, ...


2

From my experience, Emacs (for Windows) and Sublime (both free although there is a paid version for Sublime, but you don't need that) would be your best bet. I have opened 6GB files with Sublime without issues and without any modifications to the Sublime editor environment. With Emacs you will probably need the package vilf to open very large files. Emacs ...


2

This is not really an answer; it's just that it's too big to be a comment. pyenchant: Python bindings for the Enchant spellchecker. ... Enchant is used to check the spelling of words and suggest corrections for words that are miss-spelled. It can use many popular spellchecking packages to perform this task, including ispell, aspell and MySpell. First ...


2

You might consider the UNIX/Linux standard macro preprocessor m4, which does have at least one port to Windows, and is almost certainly available in WSL (although you didn't indicate what version of Windows you're using). I'm pretty sure it can handle your example substitution cleanly, and defines the substitutions almost as simply as your desire. Another ...


2

CudaText editor is almost what you need. It has plugin Sort which is called by menu item "Plugins / Sort", there you see several menu items, including "Remove duplicate lines". "Almost what you need" because "Remove duplicate lines" removes also duplicate blank lines. Try to ask at support forum, maybe this can be changed, ie blanks can be left. Plugin ...


2

You are describing a type of process which the *nix toolchain design is suited: a suite of text-processing tools that each operate upon a file or text stream in sequence, each doing a simple operation and passing the output on to the next tool in the sequence. grep is a program that is designed to be used in this way and that can be used to check whether a ...


1

This can be done without installing software but instead creating a simple batch script. Here's a script that will do what you want: @echo off > NEWFILE & setLocal enableDELAYedeXpansioN set/p D=delete all after what line? set N= :main for /f "tokens=* delims= " %%a in (file.txt) do ( set/a N+=1 if !N! leq !D! echo.%%a ) >> NEWFILE Where file....


1

For transforming XML, you should simply use any implementation of XSLT. (If you have a MS system, "msxsl" is already on your disk) It should take only a few lines of XSLT to produce equivalent JSON. XSLT won't work on JSON but what it does with XML is pretty spectacular. If that isn't enough you can add some JavaScript goo to XSLT scripts to help. In ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible