6

TikZ TikZ is a (La)TeX package for drawing all sorts of diagrams. I use it for most of my drawing needs. Its features include: Intuitive language syntax Vector graphics (so you could scale your poster to any size), A huge selection of libraries, Ability to define custom commands and styles A detailed user manual, Excellent community support on TeX.SE (...


5

I would suggest either TortoiseSVN as an SVN Client it is: free, easy to use, (integrates with file explorer), Windows Prerequisite for VsTortoise Visual Studio plugin. But reading between the lines it sounds like you have no access to the internet some of the time and do not have a server. This being the case you would be better off looking to use ...


3

It might be worth taking a look at Open Android SVN (OASVN) which is available in free, (open source LGPL), and professional versions. Some features: Support for both https & svn+ssh protocols (with private keys for the latter). Remote Repository browse allows the ability to export any single file to your local file system Remote Revision list with ...


2

Make sure to take a closer look at VisualSVN Server. VisualSVN Server is not a webapp, it is a fully-fledged Subversion server package for Active Directory environment. Relatively good web UI: source code and commit browsing are a must. VisualSVN Server has a modern web interface for Subversion repos. The web interface features a revision history ...


2

I saw you already referenced Tuleap from the previous recommendation. For lazy readers, I'll reword it here: Good web UI: we are on a big UI overhaul and our screenshot gallery speaks for us. For the subversion part, we rely on viewvc + our commit tracking base. Subversion is supported. One repository per workspace/project, you can create as much project ...


2

For git repositories I would use a combination of CLOC & git from python, the following script, run in a git repository, would produce the quarterly csv files, these could then be used by any spreadsheet program or plotted with the python csv and matplotlib libraries. #!/usr/bin/env python #coding:utf-8 # Author: Steve Barnes --<gadgetsteve@hotmail....


2

In the book Your code as a crime scene (Amazon Germany), Adam Tornhill uses version control systems to find a lot of interesting facts and presents them in a "new" way. The cool thing is that the generated graphics are interactive. You can also find videos by Adam Tornhill on Youtube, but be warned that they appear a bit staged (they focus a bit too much on ...


2

I don't know that you'll find a tool that handles all of your requirements, but, the one I can recommend is StatSvn. We use it as part of our nightly Jenkins build process. It identifies LOC and churn for us.


2

I would suggest using the Turnkey Trac distribution and telling the PVCS users to learn to use SVN - as a centralized VCS it comes as less of a shock than DVCSs such as git/hg/etc. I have just finished porting nearly 50 PVCS repositories to SVN - they contained a total of about 40k files and up to 15 years of history so it can be done - the biggest battle ...


2

PhpStorm is exactly what you are looking for, even better. Also free for students, education and open source projects, else $89 /1st year, $71 /2nd year, $53 /3rd year onwards... If you are looking for a free IDE then go with NetBeans. It also has local history.


2

Have you ever tried TortoiseSVN? It allows you to use "Blame" on a file to see previous versions of the file and highlight changes. It's free, but it is only for Windows. UPDATE: For a full blown text search, I found something called SVNQuery. I have never used it, but I found a this question on Stack Overflow that looks like it might be similar to yours.


2

TSVN is a new open source project. It's an extension in Visual Studio that acts as a UI for Tortoise. Same thing VisualSVN does except its free! https://github.com/sboulema/TSVN


1

Full disclosure: I am the founder & CEO of Comb Comb was built for teams that value efficiency. The primary focus is on a prioritized task list, and getting through that list. Comb assigns work to team members (when they request work) based on the priority list, along with a set of user-defined rules that allow work to flow through the team in a way ...


1

We used Github for a while and then Gitlab. Github is more popular and intuitive but more expensive for private projects. Gitlab is more cumbersome and slow but free for all projects and has more out-of-the-box features (but size limit on each project). They both are based around Git but I don't think they support SVN though. You could check that article if ...


1

Since you are looking for some text in the files past that information will only be available in to the server rather than locally - so access will be slow. You could however use git as an svn client to download a git repository of your project, this will take some time but believe me it will save it as well and then from the command line you can use git ...


1

I'm currently using PHPED. It's a PHP editor that provides debugging of local and remote systems and includes these features: Dynamic Syntax Highlighting Multiple Language Syntax Highlighting Auto Highlight Variable Code Folding Support for all HTML standards Fast Search Fast File Open Diff Viewer Worksets Bookmarks Code Profiler and more... And, while it ...


1

While I like yEdit, I think that http://www.graphviz.org/ would be the perfect answer, as @Izzy mentions in his comment. I have been using it for years. It is excellent for drawing any diagram with nodes (trees, network diagrams, sate machines, etc, etc, etc) Just take a look at the gallery. It is very stable, very widely used, and well supported. It is ...


1

RhodeCode might be a good fit here. It's an open source self-hosted platform for behind-the-firewall source code management. Looking at your requirements: ✓ Relatively good web UI: source code and commit browsing ✓ Support for Git, Subversion, and Mercurial ✓ SSH shell (repositories must be accessible over ssh) ✓ Permissions: private/...


1

GitLab Community Edition seems to satisfy most of your criteria.


1

TortoiseSVN has a built in diff tool that you can use or you can install kdiff3 for windows and set that as your visual diff tool by setting the SVN_MERGE environment variable, within your configuration file or via the TortoiseSVN settings dialogue. kdiff3 is available as source code or pre-built for Windows & Mac it is free.


1

Devart ReviewAssistant is a convenient tool for iterative reviews in TFS. It integrates with Visual Studio and supports TFVC as well as other source control systems.


1

For this use case, I suggest Alfresco. Alfresco replaces your traditional Windows Share. It uses the same protocol, so the change is transparent for users. You can also access it via WebDAV, CMIS, and other protocols. The Alfresco server is on your server (inside your network) so your critical information will not be sent to untrusted third-parties like ...


1

I would recommend the Visual Studio plugin ANKHSVN. It is mature and stable and has one great advantage: it adds files to Subversion automatically that you add to your solution.


1

In addition to the recommendation for TortoiseSVN, I would like to add VsTortoise. It's a plugin for Visual Studio that adds some commands that launch the TortoiseSVN right from the project, making it somewhat easier to use SVN from within VS. Basically, it gives a series of shortcuts, if you prefer to remain in one environment, but it's a great time saver. ...


1

RhodeCode Enterprise 3 (https://rhodecode.com) meets ALL of your requirements: Relatively good web UI: YES Support for Subversion: YES, even supports Git & Mercurial SSH shell: YES, possible with plugin Permissions: YES, full enterprise-grade permission system with permission delegation, permission groups, inheritance, LDAP/AD support, etc. ...


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