7

the basics the protocol you are looking for, would be VNC for a platform-independent solution. for *nix-environments XoverSSH or X2Go may be a better choice and for a CLI only, SSH is the way to go. maybe for windows RDP is also a better choice. but VNC has a big advantage for your use-case: it features a "reverse connection" to work around a port-...


7

For years now, I have been happy with TightVNC. It fully meets your requirements (FOSS, keyboard and mouse control and file transfer). I am behind a company firewall at the moment, which won't let me access the homepage, but Wikipedia says TightVNC is a cross-platform free and open-source remote desktop software application that uses and extends the ...


5

To me it seems as if join.me is the right thing. It's a remote desktop solution. The free edition can share screens (but not windows) allows VoIP conversations even has remote control features is limited to 10 participants Since the free version does not have recording features, combine it with the free Open broadcaster Software (quite powerful, consider ...


5

VNC or VNC Single Click (depending the need / both perfect for education purposes) I assumed by default that you know VNC and maybe picked TeamViewer to take advantage of some benefits like nat-traverse, that's why my reply is focused on VNC Single Click. For the full VNC I will let Wikipedia say more about the topic: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...


5

TightVNC The clear winner for remote access/administration is undoubtedly TightVNC. Some of the features I love are: file transfer is inbuilt installs as a driver to save bandwidth you have some amazing options like ignore wallpaper treat static windows as image & only track changes in mouse Java viewer (for controlling Linux/Windows from Mac), see ...


4

Team Viewer runs on Linux and is free for personal/non-commercial use. It has the ability to: Run on multiple OSes (Win, Mac, Linux, Mobile) Start automatically Route through your firewall (without setting up port forwarding) Doesn't require tinkering


3

The "cost nothing" requirement might be the issue here... However radmin might work as mentioned here there is a cost free 30 day demo version, so maybe this would be an option for you. Another option which you might test is RemoteFX: Microsoft® RemoteFX™ is included as part of the RD Virtualization Host role service, and it enables the delivery of a ...


3

Basically the remote session option would either be terminal only, usually ssh possibly using PuTTy, or via an X-Windows Terminal/Client following the X-Org specification & reference implementation. There are a number of such clients that are worth taking a look at: MobaXTerm - Free or Pro versions available XMing often combined with PuTTy Free & ...


3

This can be done with any combination of a whiteboard and screensharing softwares. For the first part, I recommend OneNote, mainly because it has a wide array of drawing and annotating tools, along with pretty accurate handwriting recognition. It can also recognize equations written by hand. I use it with my Bamboo pad, and it's very responsive. You can ...


3

Another option would be installing a VNC server. Once installed and activated you can login from remote clients as if you'd be on the physical console. Advantages: cross-platform support, any mix of Linux, Windows, OSX clients/servers can be achieved with a relatively consistent access method the same desktop session can be shared with full keyboad&...


2

Why not just access the remote Linux machine via RDP? A RDP client is natively available on Windows. On the Linux side, you just need to install the xrdp package.


2

Why not use SSH with X forwarding? Your friends will need to install X server (cygwin installer is quite friendly), log in and start pretty much any Ubuntu windows manager they want. No extra software required from Lunix side. Once cygwin with X server is installed on a windows machine, the following commands in cygwin Xorg terminal should get you to the ...


2

I ended up upgrading to Windows 10 Pro so I can just use RDP.


2

I found that xrdp combined with ssh tunneling + compression is much faster than plain X forwarding in SSH. In spite of the name it internally supports VNC. For port forwarding over ssh do something like this: ssh -v -C -L localport:127.0.0.1:remotexrdpport user@host.tld Then the client connects to localhost:localport. Enable Compression yes and ...


2

You can run VLC on the "dummy PC" and set it to stream its web cam from the IP address of that PC - then any other machine on the same network, including your VM, can connect to it as a consumer of that stream. To begin with open an instance of VLC media player and choose Open Capture Device then select your Web Cam Select the Drop Down Arrow at the side of ...


2

You may try this one: Enhanced TightVNC Viewer


1

RDP is usually great. For issue 1, maybe indeed some kind of networking problem, or using old and slow LAN hardware and cabling. For issue 2 there a simple and built-in fix... From here: Edit the settings of your Remote Desktop Connection and click on the Display tab. By default the “Display the connection bar when I use the full screen” is checked....


1

This article seems to be exactly what you would be looking for. https://serverfault.com/questions/192595/vnc-a-specific-app-only Terminal Services RemoteApp (Which is a Windows only program) seems to be just what you're looking for. However, other possible software from the linked article: VNC, Citrix, XenServer (The free version of Citrix without ...


1

I have not a direct recommendation but the term you are looking for is Webinar. https://www.google.com/search?q=webinar (yes, you can add "free" in your search n_n) Normally it shares your screen, but there are some that share the webcam as well. You define a date and can send the link to your students by mail. Look for specific features like: Chat ...


1

There are several VNC clients for Cardboard, you'll need some other app to disable Oculus home (it's a toggle, not permanent) so that you can use your gear as if it were a cardboard HMD, and a VNC server client on your target PC. Personally, I use Play Cardboard apps on Gear VR, VR Remote Desktop Free, and TightVNC (running as a service on my laptop). The ...


1

So far I've only found one solution, involving Stream Theater, an app that's not found in the Samsung Gear VR's official Oculus Store, but is instead available through SideloadVR. In any case, this Reddit thread gives instructions on how to use the Stream Theater app as a Remote Desktop. Other answers are welcome.


1

You can quite easily create database interfaces in Python and there are a number of GUI libraries available. It is also quite simple to add into the code a pull mechanism that during start-up of the program checks for updates from a specific location such as a URL or Shared Drive, (hopefully with a timeout), and to pull those updates before continuing to ...


1

Anydesk was created by ex-employess from TeamViewer. It works about the same way. On my tests, it was a bit faster than TeamViewer. Also, they have a special version for RPi. Anydesk is also free for personal use as the state on their website. AnyDesk is free for the occasional private use. Take the opportunity to use “AnyDesk Free” to convince ...


1

Chrome Remote Desktop is cross platform(Windows, Mac, Linux, Android, IOS), does not require port forwarding or any changes to the firewall. You can easily connect to other computers with an access code, or set up a code for your computers to connect while you are away.


1

I personally use RealVNC for both internal LAN connections and external connections. It can work on both ways. Furthermore, it supports a variety of platforms. In short it supports both Windows and Linux. Plus, its lightweight. It uses the client-server communication model. Either platform (Windows or Linux) can be a server or run a client. A short guide ...


1

There is something called any-desk . It is currently free and maintains a good track record. Additionally, you can also use ammyadmin another similar software, but free use is limited to 15 hours per month. But you still can get more than that out of it.


1

I've used TeamViewer over LAN before. Here's a official guide.


1

For the server side you can use the built-in Remote Desktop. It's included in all professional (and above) versions of Windows and its behavior is to block the server when a connection is accepted, therefore concealing all activity there. When a connection is made, the screen is locked and the only way to restore it is to enter the user/password of the ...


1

How is the latency to your servers? If it is good, the most simple way is: you@pc> ssh -X root@server xeyes


1

There is now an option to do this through Remote Display Experience.


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