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12

Untrusted is the closest I can think of something that matches this description. It's an adventure game where you have to modify code to solve levels and escape. However, I think it is a bit more literal than you may be getting at; I could imagine action adventure games where the solutions to puzzles are a bit more algorithmic, but I'm unaware of any.


10

You can use www.logointerpreter.com. You can write logo commands and Turtle would be happy to surf them for you! Create animations with graphic objects on the fly with the new go and go2 procedures!


9

Unit testing framework comparison criteria You should consider the following important criteria for comparing C++ unit testing frameworks: Compatibility: whether the framework compiles with your project. You may be using options like -fno-rtti and some frameworks then fail to compile. User friendliness: how much work is it to write a test. C++ does not ...


8

I'm not sure how much you do in Linux, but Vim Adventures might fall under your qualifications. The game is more of a teaching tool for VIM, but it's quite a fun game, and it can serve as a great refresher/new experience for anyone getting into text based development on Linux (well, VIM/VI anyway).


6

If you want more of a traditional game where you can optionally program solutions, I would try any big Minecraft modpack that has the Computercraft mod in it. I would recommend FTB Monster but really any pack (or your own group of mods) that has Computercraft would do. I have seen people create some very advanced automation through Computercraft using the ...


6

Colobot is an awesome game where you are required to program bots to achieve objectives. It is old. Yet awesome fun. links of interest: http://colobot.info/colobot-gold-edition/ https://github.com/colobot Elevator Saga - The elevator programming game http://play.elevatorsaga.com/


6

CheckiO is a game purely about solving programming challenges (in Python). I'm not sure if this fits your description since programming doesn't so much give you an advantage in the game, it's absolutely required. The game presents you with different missions, some of them user created, that require you to write code that satisfies a given set of unit tests....


6

Lego Mindstorms can be programmed in Block-Code, or in a C-like language. Additionally, the kids can build and physically interact with it. On the downside, it is rather expensive.


6

I think that possibly Review Board would fit your needs: It doesn't change the code You and your team can review: A change or diff An existing block of code An image, screenshot or part of the overall program A pdf, e.g. part of the documentations Power Pack Option Works with a variety of version control systems and hosts Various pricing options: Review ...


5

I played Lightbot a long time ago and thought it was an interesting way to get to know some basic programming principles. But that was an old free version. I don't know much about the newer one.


5

There is Scratch, an in-browser environment for kids to learn programming. It is visual in that graphics can be placed on a stage and then scripts can be attached to the graphics by dragging around blocks of code primitives (e.g. loops, assignments, conditionals, etc). It is used with great success at the CoderDojo Berlin, where kids aged 5 to 15 create ...


5

Screeps is the "world's first MMO strategy open world game for programmers". You have to write JavaScript to play it. You control creeps which can perform various actions, and the goal is to create your own empire and to conquer the territories of other players. Depending on how you program your creeps, they can react to events while you are offline. The ...


5

Sublime Text should be able to do all three of your tasks: Basic context coloring This generally happens automatically. Ability to collapse {} blocks You can do this by using the "gutter" (the area where the line numbers are displayed). To fold a {} block, click on the triangle in the gutter that's on the same row as the { character. You can also ...


5

You should take a look at Coding Ground from TutorialsPoint. It’s an online collection of programming resources, tutorials, and tools. It’s free and supports lots of programming languages including script languages like Python, Powershell, PHP, etc. Projects can be saved to online services like Github, Dropbox, Google Drive and OneDrive.


4

There is this Belgian game currently in development, by Fishing Cactus: Algo Bot. It's considered a serious game and is based on algorithms (hence the name) and programming. It looks very promising! :)


4

Given your no age group specification, I would recommend you look at the Raspberry Pi. It's a real cheap (US$30) computer that is meant for kids to learn about programming and computers in general. It comes with a language called Scratch that teaches programming. More importantly, kids feel like they have their own computer.


4

Alice is an excellent way to learn about object-oriented programming, by interacting with 3D objects to create animations and games. It uses a visual programming language, so is a bit like an advanced version of Scratch. Microsoft Kodu is also fun, as it lets you create 3D video games using an Xbox 360 controller and a visual interface.


4

Here is another online Logo available at https://vrmath2.net/VRM2. I hope the 3D Turtle is good looking enough. If not, it can be changed to a fish or airplane. This Logo allows open/save logo files as well as image and x3d files. Note: there are a few file types to open and save. For Logo files, please open in Logo Editor (from Window menu, or click on the ...


4

You should take a look at the Eric IDE: From your list: Mac - Yes & Windows & Linux Ruby on Rails and/or Python PHP (least important) - Written for Ruby & Python Debugging (in the browser, and with the ability to set breakpoints and step through code - debugging support is essential) - Yes Customizable Syntax Highlighting for all supported ...


4

I would recommend StarUML. StarUML is an open source project to develop fast, flexible, extensible, featureful, and freely-available UML/MDA platform running on Win32 platform. The goal of the StarUML project is to build a software modeling tool and also a platform that is a compelling replacement of commercial UML tools such as Rational Rose, Together ...


4

I would like to supplement the community wiki answer with a couple of other points to consider when selecting your testing framework, this is addressing your picking a test tool: Price - Free or reasonably priced testing frameworks such as Google Test and CppUnit will almost always be ahead on popularity but may not meet your other requirements. Level of ...


4

Take a look at Evan's Debugger. (open source for linux) https://github.com/eteran/edb-debugger http://www.codef00.com/projects#debugger Printscreen:


4

Personally I would go for python, possibly under Jupyter as a notebook, you can even try it in a browser, as in many schools it is now the first language taught, possible other python IDEs are too numerous to list in full but can be moved onto later. The Jupyter notebook is a nice simple starting environment. Gratis (and Open Source) Cross Platform Lots of ...


4

[Update to accepted answer, for the benefit of future readers] : As @CAD97 prophesied, WebAssembly is now supported across all major browsers. If you want to reduce the amount of JS that you code (you cannot elimnate it entirely), then Google for WebAssembly, if you can code in C, C++ or Rust. Here's a very simple example from this tutorial : Take the C ...


4

I would strongly recommend trying the Jupyter notebooks environment with one of several plotting libraries that support animation. This combination lets you combine, on a single notebook page, text formatted with markdown, formulae with latex or mathjax, plots & graphs, etc. nice example here. Amongst the plotting tools that support animation there are:...


3

The Mono project should allow you to easily port your C# code to Linux. You can check their compatibility page to see if the particular components you use are supported.


3

As mentioned in another answer because you need to run the same application that was build for windows using visual studio and c#, your first choice should be to try monodevelop which aims at providing familiriaty for visual studio developers in a unix environment. In a simple search I found this handy example which creates a graphic application by drag &...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible