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42

I use Libre Office. It is one of many possibilities available to you. Libre Office can be used to edit and save documents which are in MS Office format, including Visio. It also uses the OpenDocument file format. You would have to download the installation pack first but it does not need to be online during installation.


18

I think the first thing you need to do is evaluate how you use Office and what you need it to do. I find what I need in office apps is subtly and annoyingly different on Linux than on Windows and a lot of the cross-platform approaches don't cut it. This may be partly to do with the things I do with spreadsheets and the like, but it is something to think ...


15

You can use OpenOffice. It has a "full installation" download (about 134 MB) that does not require internet access for the installation. It is also compatible with many file formats including Microsoft Office formats.


12

LibreOffice actually has a good bibliography feature built in. I'm not sure how it compares to Word's since I've never really used either. However, the first thing you need to do is update your LibreOffice installation. The latest version is 4.2.0.4; you're a long way behind! The first thing to do is to make sure that the bibliography database is ...


12

KingSoft should not be left out of the list of alternatives. It's available for several platforms including Linux, Windows, Android and iOS (soon). Linux site. I've tried the Windows version and in my opinion it's: Free Nice and easy to use. Very similar look and feel to MS Office 2007 such as home button, ribbons and menus with some differences ...


11

Microsoft Office 2013 does not require an internet connection. Office 365 is pushed heavily, which can cloud (no pun intended) the issue, but there are still fully-packaged product versions of MS Office 2013 for sale (although it can be challenging, depending on geo, to find it).


10

There is SoftMaker FreeOffice which is the zero-price less-featured version of the SoftMaker Office suite. It’s a commercial product (the FreeOffice version is just free of charge), so it’s got some amount of testing, consistence (by means of a small, cathedral-like development team) and effort in it, which may be better or worse than the Open Source bazaar-...


9

If you still like the Microsoft Office's features, but don't want to spend any money or having to deal with bugs from a port of the original Microsoft Office, you can try OneDrive. OneDrive is made by Microsoft and offers Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Onenote and plain text files to be created, all for free. It comes with 5GB of free space. It also allows you to ...


8

I like using Abiword (don't worry -- it's not as ugly as the site would suggest) with Gnumeric -- not really an office suite, but unless you want presentations they are usually enough. They are not too heavy on features, but very fast and have a user-friendly interface. Abiword: Gnumeric:


7

Another -- this time rather extensive -- office suite is Calligra, which consists of (descriptions from their sites): Braindump is a tool to dump and organize the content of your brain (ideas, drawings, images, texts…) to your computer. It works by allowing to create and edit whiteboards, which are infinite canvas on which you can add texts, images, charts, ...


6

"Without any loss of functionality" is the key here. If that is "absolute" (as in do precisely the same thing, precisely the same way, always) then it's a not. There isn't. The reason is farily simple: MS office is being developed for a few decades now, with big teams of developers, and to replicate absolutely everything you would need the same amount of "...


4

Because a lot of the answers are not really good in my opinion and I now can answer, here it was I think: If you need 100% compatibility with the newest docx format, you want to use Microsoft Office. There is a version of MS Office 2013 without the need to activate Online (it works via phone) sold, but compared to the Office 356 version it is ridiculously ...


4

Before there even was Office Lens, the de-facto app for this sort of thing on Android and iOS systems has been CamScanner for some time. It does exactly the sorts of things you're talking about here. There are quite a number of similar apps as well, but that is the one I've seen used by folks for this job. Besides your requirements about auto-crop and ...


4

I have used the Teamlab software before It has word processor, spreadsheet and presentation, and those are compatible with Word, Excel and PowerPoint. Can open, save, edit files from those programs. I think the "document editor" module has the functions you would normally use in the Word editor: fonts, character and paragraph formatting, insert pictures ...


3

I am using EuroOffice, a free Office suite which is mainly based on the source code of OpenOffice, but it is enhanced with professional language tools and Microsoft Office file filters from LibreOffice. It also offers many free extensions (and also some commercial ones). It runs on Linux, Windows, and Android.


3

Image Capture can save multi-page PDFs, I use the feature all the time. First you'll want to switch form the simple view to the detail view: Then select the format you want to save to, and check the "Combine into single document" checkbox. Once you set these settings, they will become the default settings until you change them.


3

The LEADTOOLS Documents SDK has the ability to convert all of the Microsoft Office formats and output as PDF in .NET. Here is a list of all of the support formats that the SDK can convert from and to: Adobe Acrobat PDF and PDF/A Microsoft Office DOC/DOCX, XLS/XLSX, PPT/PPTX, PST, EML, MSG, and XPS formats CAD formats such as DXF, DWG, and DWF ...


2

As already mentioned by many, LibreOffice is the best option you have. And what's more its available for Windows and Linux based OS, OS X, Android based OS and best of all - its opensource, free and well supported by the community.


2

Libre office will let you do this. From https://help.libreoffice.org/Common/Using_Microsoft_Office_and LibreOffice can open and save documents in the Microsoft Office file formats, including Microsoft Office Open XML formats. Contents 1 Opening a Microsoft Office File 2 Saving as a Microsoft Office File 3 Saving Documents by Default in Microsoft ...


2

ownCloud / Nextcloud would cover that, but might be a bit overkill. Both are available for self-hosting, and both also offer a list of providers who'd host it for you. Let's see how they'd fit your requirements¹: simple to use: I'd say so – but of course, that depends on the user :) no installation needed to use: chose your provider, then it's a clear "Yes"....


2

Overleaf.com could be a replacement for Google Docs. simple to use Depends what you need to write. Not so easy to use if you don't know LaTeX, it takes some time to get used to. However, they have created a Rich Text editor (similar to Docs) which should do the trick for you. It will cover more LaTeX over time. no installation needed to use You can edit ...


1

Essential DocIO is available for free through the community license program if you qualify. Essential DocIO doesn't require Office to be installaed and can read .DOC and .DOCX files. .NET 2.0 is also supported.


1

@Stackoverflowed and me think the same KingSoft is in my opinion the best, in terms of functionality, lightweight, and look and feel. kingsoftstore.com/download-office (I have 101 rep but I can't post an answer). – StackOverflowed Kingsoft WPS Office Professional As an office suite of desktop applications, WPS Office consists of a word processor—Writer,...


1

JPEGView fits the bill. Once you've opened the image file with that application (I have it set as the default image viewer) you can Ctrl & C to copy, switch to Excel and paste away.


1

I'm using Gwenview for this on Linux. This application belongs to the KDE desktop (so it will draw in "some" requirements). It's primarily an image viewer with a lot of extensions, and a.o. also features an automatic slide-show mode. For your case, the automatic slide-show mode might not be fitting. But you could start the application in full-screen with ...


1

I think DocumentsToGo does exactly this. It features opening and editing of Office formats for Word, Excel and Powerpoint. It has both a free and a premium version. Unfortunately the Premium version is slightly over budget, it costs $16.99.


1

Apparently with Office 365 Enterprise Edition by Microsoft "you can create a password-protected portal to share large, hard-to-e-mail files both inside and outside your organization". At least this is what they claim, but then you'll need to pay about $20 a month if that's an option. I really doubt you'll be able to find a free option for this but good luck!...


1

For a non-Pythonic approach you could consider a couple of other possibilities using MS Word as a starting point. You can use words find, click on the advanced tag and you can search for a given set of characteristics and use find all - the downside is that you need to know in advance which characteristics you are looking for. You could export your document ...


1

I would take a look at python-docx it allows full manipulation of word docx files, including (according to the quickstart guide), "open and work on an existing Word document". The documentation is a bit light on the fact that once you have opened an existing document the same semantics apply for existing elements as for elements you are adding. This is made ...


1

If it's really just the copying and pasting you need, and viewing side-by-side, there's no GUI programme I'm aware of (unfortunately, I have to do the same as you rather frequently). However, I've found just the standard system utilities do what I need. I use the following in Terminator (a split window terminal emulator): column -s, -t < a.csv | less -#2 ...


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