29

Smokeping (demo) does all that. However, this includes multiple caveats. This is not out-of-the box solution for Windows. I have not tested this on Windows, but I'm using Smokeping for exactly same thing. To avoid installing on Windows, see bottom of this post. It's for unix based systems, so installing it to windows is not easy There's no GUI. All ...


17

If you use Windows Vista or later versions, you don't need to install any additional software to see the processes with network activity, Windows comes with Resource Monitor. You just need to have been the Windows task manager (Ctrl + Shift + Escape) and click on resource monitor: In the "network" tab you can see the processes with network activity:


14

Monitorix is the monitoring tool of my choice (though I'm running Debian and Ubuntu on my machines; Monitorix is available for many distributions, including RedHat/Fedora/CentOS). It of course includes network traffic... Network traffic: overall and per port (click images for original size) ...but also much more system health criteria, even details for ...


11

I believe that you can get this information from Process Explorer. It is a free download from Microsoft, (originally by Sysinternals), as it can let you see which process(es) are performing the most network traffic. You could also take a look at Process Monitor. This story is well worth a read as well. (Sorry can't include any screenshots at the ...


9

You can use NetHogs: free install with sudo apt-get install -y nethogs runs in the terminal display the live network throughput per PID: Note that for NFS/AFS traffic you will see ? as PID:


7

You can use Wireshark: free and open-source works on Windows/Linux/Mac can capture all network data. Just filter what you need:


6

I will recommend you Net Speed Monitor. I jumped on it after using NetWorx for some time. It is not as powerful as NetWorx. But, its simplicity is why I liked it. Looks very clean on the taskbar. The popup menu shows monthly and daily stats. Taskbar font settings are changeable Shows process consuming internet Show net usage daily or monthly. You can also ...


6

Tasker might be an app to go with here. It doesn't come for free (there's a 7 day trial at their homepage, but then it's ~USD 5 if you really want to use it after that), and it requires some effort to get into it – but if you ask me, it's definitely worth it. Other apps from "the same section" (Automation apps) might be able to achieve what you want, but I ...


5

Take a look at Networx. It monitors IP traffic from your computer and will keep logs on a per process basis, it is also free. Unlike most of the other suggestions, this utility logs usage over time, not just a real-time view of current usage.


5

NTM (Network Traffic Monitor) is an application to use on computers with a limited Internet plan. It can display a complete report for received and transmitted network traffic and automatically disconnect after a certain period of time or after the traffic exceeds the value you set. Download Monitor displays monthly, daily and hourly amount of data ...


5

You could try MXToolbox's SMTP checker. It's not a generic service that can check any port but it will check whether or not an SMTP server is listening and whether it can be connected to. Here's some details: It's a webapp hosted on mxtoolbox.com available via a web browser It won't keep automatically trying until you cancel it, you'll need to manually ...


5

Sure is, it's called NetHogs and it's open source. Out of the box it doesn't give you fancy plots, but it does feature: a 'top' like display, showing programs currently using bandwidth, how much, ordered by consumption (view can be customized) Easily log data to a file, which you can use any number of plotting / visualization programs to generate graphs (...


4

I like to use Network Protocol Analyzer for this. It includes a network sniffer to capture network traffic, modify and resend it and has a function called "packet builder" that can create arbitrary packets from scratch and send them. It's free, for Windows, with a GUI that I think it's reasonably easy to use (YMMV).


4

I've been using NetWorx. Simple to use and logs everything. NetWorx is a simple and free, yet powerful tool that helps you objectively evaluate your bandwidth situation. You can use it to collect bandwidth usage data and measure the speed of your Internet or any other network connection. NetWorx can help you identify possible sources of network problems, ...


4

You can use tcpdump: free and open-source works on Linux can sniff network data, such as POP3 passwords: Code snippet to get POP3 passwords and a bit more: tcpdump port http or port ftp or port smtp or port imap or port pop3 -l -A | egrep -i 'pass=|pwd=|log=|login=|user=|username=|pw=|passw=|passwd=|password=|pass:|user:|username:|password:|login:|pass |...


4

OpenWrt OpenWrt is a rather popular option that supports AVR32, ARM, CRIS, m68k, MIPS, PowerPC, SPARC, SuperH, Ubicom32, x86, and x86-64 instruction sets. Why OpenWrt? To quote the OpenWrt about page Instead of trying to create a single, static firmware, OpenWrt provides a fully writable filesystem with package management. This frees you from the ...


4

There's a good blog post located here that describes using netcat, wireshark, and PowerShell scripts to forward localhost traffic to your default gateway and back. An apparent caveat is that it may cause you to see double traffic (outbound and inbound). The solution is to change your capture filter accordingly. If I were capturing on my local system, I'd ...


3

I'd use ngrep. It's more or less tcpdump and grep rolled into one tool. You can use the same match conditions (verbatim) as in Franck Dernoncourt's answer, but you don't have to pipe between tools, and having the regular expression match on a per-packet-content basis rather than per-line as in grep is nicer. ngrep -i 'pass=|pwd=|log=|login=|user=|username=...


3

You can use dsniff: free and open-source works on Linux can sniff network data, such as POP3 password: dsniff -i any 'tcp port pop3' Sample output: dsniff: listening on any [tcp port pop3] ----------------- 11/18/10 10:41:01 tcp xxx.48323 -> remote.host.110 (pop3) USER user1 PASS pass-for-user1 ----------------- 11/18/10 10:41:28 tcp xxx.48321 -> ...


3

While looking for such a software over the internet I found the article How to Monitor Your Internet Usage So You Don't Exceed Your Data Cap. It suggested the use of ntop, which could be installed using: sudo apt-get install ntop ntop currently start on start-up and automatically logs the network usage of every network device that is specified at the time ...


3

You can take the software Anturis, which is free up to 5 monitors, with the ability to monitor various servers and all possible metrics. The alerts are effective:sms, emil and phone. There are troubleshooting options for people who don't feel like real experts.


3

Try Irssi ConnectBot: Free, open-source software Supports Telnet, SSH, and MOSH if you download the version that has the mosh patches Reputable, with over 1700 reviews on Google Play No ads No root required Supports landscape mode (try the Force Landscape option under the Terminal Emulation options)


3

Capsa seems to correspond with your requirements: Must run on Windows or Linux. Former preferred: Runs on Windows, at least from XP to Windows-8 are supported officially. Not software that needs to be installed on every host and then report to a central logger: As I read it, it needs to be installed on a single machine only. From there it "sniffs" on the ...


3

I'm not sure about all your requirements, but I would recomment to look deeper into ZOC SSH Client. I have used it in the past (still occasionally) and I can confirm a few of your requirements: running on 7/8/10 (per their feature page) you can choose a custom data folder on their installer has an extensive directory of hosts with stored password or scripts ...


3

A very powerful and capable alternative, or complement, to Wireshark is scapy which itself is a library for Python the original version runs under python 2 but there is also an effort to port to python 3. Free, Gratis & Open Source Cross Platform Analysis of existing wireshark file Very powerful filtering Perform Capture itself from an interactive ...


2

I use Netdata and I would highly recommend it. It's easy to install, light-weight, and provides real-time monitoring for everything you listed, and much more. I am running it on a variety of Linux systems from single-board computers to servers. You can view a live demo here. PyDash is worth checking out, too.


2

You can use SniffPass: free but not open-source works on Windows 98/ME/NT/2000/XP/2003/Vista/7 NirSoft quality can capture the passwords of the following Protocols: POP3, IMAP4, SMTP, FTP, and HTTP (basic authentication passwords).


2

My personal favourite in that realm is Scapy. According to this answer, it seems to be possible to run on Windows platforms, too.


2

If you use Windows XP or before, you can use Sygate Personal Firewall by http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sygate_Technologies: Free to try; $39.95 to buy Windows 95/NT/98/Me/2000/XP Very lightweight (~10 MB of RAM) You can see the processes with network activity and block specific .exe from accessing Internet. For the background story, Sygate Personal Firewall ...


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