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15

Foobar2000 has a plugin called bpm auto analysis that will do bpm analysis - you'll just need to add the two dlls to the component folder. can be run in portable mode, so you can run it in addition to your current music player can be run as a batch job on selected songs in a playlist (or all songs on a playlist) can be set to write to the bpm tag can ...


11

MuseScore is an easy-to-use sheet music writer. The best thing is that you can export to PDF, PNG, WAV and other formats! It works on Mac, Windows and Linux. Here is a C Major scale I made for the piano: If you look at the top of the image, you can see all the different notes you can use (and this is in the Piano music mode). One more thing: It's free!!


9

You should be able to do this with Mp3tag. Mp3tag has a replace with regular expression action that will allow you to remove spaces in any tag field you want. Your requirements: With some knowledge of regular expressions, you can trim spaces from the beginning and end of any ID3 field you want. Has the option of looking in all subfolders of a selected ...


9

MusicBrainZ Picard is a cross-platform, free as in freedom and free beer music tagger. Here is a quick guide to efficient file tagging. It is free, cross-platform, integrates well with most Linux media players, recognizes any song present in an album registered on the MusicBrainZ database, which is pretty complete on most genres and easy to contribute to, ...


8

I think your problem constists of two subproblems. You first need to find out which songs are duplicates and then delete them. For finding duplicates I recommend MusicBrainz Picard. This takes fingerprints of your files and tags them correctly. It also offers renaming and moving the files. If there are duplicates the filename will have an additional number ...


7

Quod Libet (License: GPL v2) seems to have all features you mentioned: playlists are supported (can be exported as M3U and PLS via plugin) covers are displayed (it looks for a file in the current folder named, e.g., folder.jpg) (there is also a plugin that can download covers) it comes with a notification plugin it comes with a plugin for Sound Menu ...


7

I suggest ACRCloud, which is a comprehensive audio recognition services providers. Music recognition is one of the solutions, with 40m tracks as its music catalogue. Offers Android, iOS, Java and Python SDKs.


7

What you're looking for is probably a Fast Fourier Transform, or "Frequency Analysis". Audacity can do this, with the Analyze -> Plot Spectrum… tool. This will output a graph, and you simply find where it peaks to ascertain the Hertz value of whatever sound you were analyzing. This of course only works if the tone is constant. If your sound file ...


7

You can use Mixx: free and open-source Linux/Windows/Mac synchronization and auto-beatmatching (+ usual features of a DJ software) See all features.


7

I’m using Quod Libet with a music library of 170 GB (~ 30000 tracks). Its performance is outstanding. My PC is old and has weak hardware, but listing (or searching through) all those 30000 tracks only takes a few seconds (maybe 2-4 secs). Unlike some, Quod Libet will scale to libraries with tens of thousands of songs. This good performance was one of ...


7

You can use Tunatic: Identify music being played Free Simple to use Runs on Windows


7

Clementine Screenshot (click image for larger variant) Features Search and play your local music library. Listen to internet radio from Spotify, Grooveshark, SomaFM, Magnatune, Jamendo, SKY.fm, Digitally Imported, JAZZRADIO.com, Soundcloud, Icecast and Subsonic servers. Search and play songs you've uploaded to Box, Dropbox, Google Drive, and ...


6

I use most of the time Traktor. Its features: non-free (like beers) but: commonly used among DJs (so you can expect the BPM to be accurate) update MP3 tags to include BPM info extracted from the files, while not losing other information already existing in those tags BPM with 3-decimal (BTW keep in mind that the ID3 BPM is an integer, while a decent music ...


5

Mediamonkey seems to cover most of my needs. The free version handles 1 and 3 It allows me to Sync a random subset of files up to the device capacity, and let me leave a certain amount of space free. The paid version also does conversion based off rules so does 2. Its standalone (though not portable), and dosen't rely on anything else. As a bonus, it ...


5

In default Ubuntu installation, there's Rhythmbox that includes at least almost all features you want. List of requirements from the question: Playlists: yes. Ability to change song from taskbar: yes, with plugin (I haven't used this) Album covers: yes. CD import: yes. Notification when the song is changing: yes (bubble) It is obviously not as well ...


5

Puddletag is solution I'm using on Ubuntu. Puddletag generally looking is very similar to mp3tag available on windows platform. Requested functions: Trimming can be done using function Trim Whitespace (I don’t use this function personally since i do rename all files using my specific pattern) Folders can be added recursively GUI available Free of charge ...


5

Other than the OS X requirement, deadbeef sounds like a good option - it's basically an attempt to build a foobar clone for linux. It dosen't run on OS X but it does have a plugin system, last.fm support, customisable columns and cue support. It has some DSP supports and plugins, but nowhere near as mature as foobar2000, and you'll likely need to test it to ...


5

Audacity is the software, you are looking for. It's free, open source, cross-platform audio editor. What I like is that it supports many audio formats. You require LAME encoder library to export MP3 files. Some notable features are Easy editing with Cut, Copy, Paste and Delete. Unlimited sequential Undo (and Redo) to go back any number of steps. Edit and ...


5

You can simply use Windows Explorer: Note that the bit rate is the encoding, not the actual quality of the track. See program to determine the lowest quality encoding a music file went through.


5

LilyPond is the go to for musical notation engraving - there are several python libraries that interface with it such as Abjad. Gratis - Yes python - can be interfaced with raspberry-pi - Yes output to pdf, ps or png generate the: - treble clef, - lines, - rhythm indicator - and the notes. All of the above, using a text notation, and more such as ...


5

This is really two steps... 1st -- "Sheet Music" >>into>> "Data" (i.e. Music XML) Open Source! https://audiveris.kenai.com/ Shareware/Trials/Commercial Software: Capella Scan Photoscore Sharpeye Smartscore List item Note: special 'exception', PdfToMusic will 'scan' PDFs generated by music programs into MusicXML 2nd -- "Data" >>into editor>>export ...


4

You can use Auslogics' Duplicate File Finder free compatible with Windows XP, Vista, 7, 8.1 fast compare not only file names, but also contents to ensure no false search results. allow you to specify the file types and sizes to look for, and decide which copies to delete. don't come with crapware allow you to easily select which folders to analyze Like you ...


4

How about just requiring your users to get an API Key? Without full details on your use case I can't say if this would be a good option but I think that it most cases it would be. It is not an odd thing to do and is done by some very popular open source projects - such as Responsive File Manager


4

You can use the sound server PulseAudio Volume Control (aka. pavucontrol and previously known as Polypaudio): free run on Ubuntu (KDE/Gnome) amplify the sound (default max boost: ~150%) however the higher the amplification, the more distorted the sound will be FYI if you want to go over the default max boost (~150%): see this thread.


4

As far as I know there's no universal tool for it - there's mp3gain for mp3s, vorbisgain for ogg, and metaflac for flac. All three options can be let loose on a folder with subfolders using find - with something like find . -iname '*.mp3' -execdir mp3gain -r -k "{}" \; & - the precise command is via porg.es. There's a pretty nice pre-made ...


4

I can recommend these two linux audio players: gmusicbrowser and Quod Libet support huge libraries (mine is 60.000 tracks with more than 100 GB) GTK+ based free and open source support (auto-)playlists support most common audio formats GUI is customizable (lots of preconfigured layouts)


4

Ive been using Auralia for years now as both a student and a teacher and have found it fantastic. It covers all those topics and much more. My students love it and their progress speaks for itself. It's certainly not free, but well worth the cost. The developers have also started releasing a suite of single topic apps for ipad/iphone.


4

It quite depends on the complexity of whatever you're writing and whether you want WYSIWYG and things like MIDI keyboard input. In my experience, people who create music require both, those who are just typesetting are usually happy with the computer keyboard option - it tends to be faster than point 'n click. AFAIK, the most popular commercial solution is ...


4

Wikipedia has a Comparison of scorewriters where you can compare features of lots of such programmes. You can compare output formats, whether they support tab notation etc. I tried a few, and I like Denemo (an interface to Lilypond, which user3326 mentioned): It's free It is available for various systems, including Windows Every musical notation you could ...


4

You can use Midi Sheet Music free and open source plays MIDI music files while highlighting the piano notes and sheet music notes supports multiple channels Works on Windows, Mac OS X, and Ubuntu Linux. Export the sheets to PDF


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