10

There is a cross-platform application named LMMS (Linux Multimedia Studio): runs on Windows too despite its name free and open-source it has MIDI support can export to ogg and wav can include audio files (probably only ogg and wav) it has a gallery of ogg samples and instruments multiple tracks with independent volume supports VST plugins


7

Take a look at LMMS (Linux Multi-Media Studio). This project begun as a clone of the popular windows software FL Studio. I have been using both a few years ago, and LMMS was still having a lot to catch up with. It has support for most of the basic plugins and features already present in FL Studio, which are VSTi plugins. Also, it supports the FL Studio file ...


4

There are a couple of applications I've come across for editing Sound Font files (*.sf2) in Linux: Polyphone SWARMI Both of these applications are licensed under GPLv3 and are free to use and allow you to create new Sound Font files, edit existing files (replacing or adding to them, or removing sounds from a Sound Font file). Additionally, Polyphone is ...


2

Can I suggest that you tale a look at Hydrogen: a desktop & open source application - Yes to both should work on Linux platforms - Linux specific. but there are OSX and Windows builds. nice rhythms and accompaniments - You can put together your own sequences to meet your requirements - you can also download sequences that others have built. easy to use ...


2

I have been using Reaper for a few years now and I cannot recommend it enough. It might not be as powerful as the industry standard Pro Tools, but for home recording (like what you are asking for) with options for tracking time-signature changes amongst a plethora of other features, I have found it to be the most reasonable DAW that falls somewhere at the ...


2

Since I own a license for Synthesia I could check in "Free play" mode what you want and I think I found the issue: there seem to be many programs that do play notes which are received via MIDI, but some of them don't respect the instrument setting and will only play a single instrument instead. Synthesia does respect the instrument setting. Since you ...


2

Melodyne is a commercial solution (~200 USD, assistent version needed) that probably outperforms most others with regards to usability and features, although it's a bit expensive for the task you want to achieve. At least it can save as MIDI and therefore is an answer to the question. Let's see if you get cheaper ones as well. Taking a tuba sound from ...


2

I would suggest taking a look at Denemo which seems to fit a lot of your requirements: Music input from teh PC Keyboard, MIDI Controller or acoustically Produces sheet music in various notations vial LilyPond to produce beautifully typeset sheet music. Your music can produce prints, images and music files as well routing your music in real time to other ...


2

Try MuseScore. Free of charge, very capable.


2

You can use Mixxx: Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux free and open source (GPL v2) It's basically a mixing software, so you can use it to record remixes on the fly.


1

VirtualDJ is a very good software, which I think will support your needs. But the problem is that it has only Windows version. So to run it in Linux you should first install Wine and then install VirtualDJ using Wine. Hope this will help you.


1

I am able to use human voice "ooh" and "ahh" sounds in Rosegarden using the FluidR3_GM2-2.sf2 soundfont. This (for me) is under Arch 64 bit as a virualbox guest using Timidity as the midi daemon under ALSA. All of this is open source and the soundfont is free with no royalties. This will satisfy the part of your question "instead of playing the normal ...


1

If commercial software is acceptable, you might want to take a look at Myriad's Melody Assistant and Harmony Assistant (I use the latter). Harmony Assistant is the more capable version of the two, a superset of Melody Assistant. Both programs allow you to enter your music as standard notation in a point-and-click interface, and can generate mp3 file as well ...


1

Equalizer APO https://sourceforge.net/projects/equalizerapo/ with Peace https://sourceforge.net/projects/peace-equalizer-apo-extension/ offers some of SoundSource offers, but it a far cry. Eq APO supports VST plugins, but CanOpener Studio, for example, doesn't work. Peace is nice as it gives you tray access to your presets. There are a few crossfeed settings,...


1

Audacity: has a very effective filter for noise removal Supports import/export of AC3, M4A/M4R & with the optional FFmpeg library Is free, gratis & open source Is available for Windows/Mac/Linux Can do a lot more.


1

Really, the only app that comes anywhere close [if the phase flip trick doesn't work, which it usually doesn't] is Izotope's Music Rebalance It is only available as part of a larger package & starts at $399 Even at that price it isn't perfect. It works on some sources better than others. A demo of the full RX7 suite is available, so you can at least ...


1

The easy answer is Audacity: Free, Gratis & Open Source Cross Platform, Windows, Linux & Mac OS-X. Multi-track Supports most sound file formats Adjust volume with Compressor, Amplify, Normalize, Fade In/Out, Studio Fade Out, Crossfade Clips, Crossfade Tracks and Adjustable Fade effects. Personally I find it fills every audio editing task that I ...


1

Acoustid has a list of specific applications including Picard which rely on open source technology but for any serious use I would suggest taking a look at ARCloud for music recognition.


1

Not sure what you are looking for exactly, but most modern music players can create playlists in m3u format or others. MusicBee can create both static playlists or so called "Smart Playlists" which are built automatically from your music library or a subset of it, using any of a multitude of filters and rules. Besides those it can have regular playlists ...


1

You might consider using ZynAddSubFX. It is free, open-source, available for Linux, Windows and Mac. Among other options, you can perform FM synthesis; there are some presets, but you can also edit your own synthesizer with it.


1

I ended up using Garritan Personal Orchestra, which features a standalone program called "Aria Player" that is able to render MIDI directly to orchestral sounds.


1

What about sonic-pi, it is a free tool/IDE that supports a variety of different built in synths as well as the ability to code in your own.


1

I know it's a bit old but I just came across this question :) How about lilypond. It's cross-platform, (works on all versions of Windows as well). It's a text based music notation, can export to midi and pdf music sheet. Check it out for far more awesome features at http://lilypond.org.


1

You can try Audacity: the GUI is quite austere but it is a good start.


1

I think lmms https://lmms.io/ should fit in your needs. It's a relative simple cross platform music composition software.


1

You can try AudoEditMagic. The newest version release was in 2007, which makes it meet your low memory system requirements. Features: Low system requirements (functions with 166MHz Pentium processor) Windows 7 and earlier Fairly easy to use Simple editing with predefined and custom presets Noise reduction tool Free trial, and paid full version Here's a ...


1

If you have hardware instruments and need powerful editing tools, use Audacity (and download Sweep just for the extra close to 200 editing effects). If you need virtual instruments, but don't require much editing, use LMMS. I don't think it would work, but you could try FL Studio on Wine (Wine runs Windows programs on Linux).


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