30

I would recommend VLC it will play just about any video/audio you throw at it (except rmvb) it is not under 30mb in size, it's around 100mb (after installation), but this is due to it containing all the codecs it needs instead of relying on the system codecs - I don't think you will find much improvement here if you count the size that other players would ...


15

I recommend media player classic which is available with klite codec package almost every day (I've not used it with dvd though) and it's one of the best media player applications I've ever used. This nice application can remember almost everything include Last window size Last video position for each video you played. Note that it also remembers the last ...


14

I would recommend Media Player Classic - Home Cinema. It has the same interface as the old media player in WinXP but plays most video and audio files. I find MPC-HC is easier to turn subtitles on and off compared to VLC. It is about 36mb and is open source.


13

You can use any video player and increase the volume up using the sound server PulseAudio Volume Control (aka. pavucontrol and previously known as Polypaudio): free run on Ubuntu (KDE/Gnome) amplify the sound (default max boost: ~150%) however the higher the amplification, the more distorted the sound will be FYI if you want to go over the default max ...


12

You can try VLC from videolan.org. It is free, but you should donate if you use it (especially in a business environment). :) It supports up to 32x playback speed - 32 seconds real footage in 1 second - so, 8 hours in 15 minutes. But you should ask yourself - you really can catch up something in that speed? And the more important thing is: your processor ...


10

You could extract one image every X seconds, which you can do using FFmpeg (free, open-source, Windows, Mac and Linux) with the command ffmpeg -i input.mov -r 0.25 output_%04d.png to get a picture every four (4=1/0.25) seconds. (Then you might want to create a video slideshow based on those pictures)


8

SMPlayer remembers the settings of all files you play. So you start to watch a movie but you have to leave, when you open that movie again it will be resumed at the same point you left it, and with the same settings: audio track, subtitles, volume even after restart, it runs on windows, has a configurable screen (4:3,16:9, stretched, full etc) don't know ...


7

Quod Libet (License: GPL v2) seems to have all features you mentioned: playlists are supported (can be exported as M3U and PLS via plugin) covers are displayed (it looks for a file in the current folder named, e.g., folder.jpg) (there is also a plugin that can download covers) it comes with a notification plugin it comes with a plugin for Sound Menu ...


6

Metal Player has an option to verbally announce next song, or the song that has just finished. Default it's disabled, but you can enable this option from Settings > Intelligent Playback. It has options to add files/folders and play them as you want: random, recursively or based on your musical preferences (it has some intelligent playback algorithms that ...


6

Before I switched on Linux, I used VLC and BSplayer. Both are good media players but since you seem to have issues with VLC you may try BSplayer. Bsplayer has a free and paid version. Paid version is quite expensive (29.90 EUR for a new licence at the moment and 19.90 EUR if renewing a licence). In BSplayer, for seeing DVD menus, you will need a paid ...


5

In default Ubuntu installation, there's Rhythmbox that includes at least almost all features you want. List of requirements from the question: Playlists: yes. Ability to change song from taskbar: yes, with plugin (I haven't used this) Album covers: yes. CD import: yes. Notification when the song is changing: yes (bubble) It is obviously not as well ...


5

I suggest VLC even though you have already tried it. It supports most of what you want. Press key to fullscreen: Yes. The key is Ctrl + h or F11 whether you want to see other windows or not. Show/hide elements of the player: No. You have some presets that you can acitvate (like h for a minimaist player, l (small L) toggles between video/visual and playlist. ...


5

Other than the OS X requirement, deadbeef sounds like a good option - it's basically an attempt to build a foobar clone for linux. It dosen't run on OS X but it does have a plugin system, last.fm support, customisable columns and cue support. It has some DSP supports and plugins, but nowhere near as mature as foobar2000, and you'll likely need to test it to ...


5

VLC supports this feature. You do it by clicking Playback → Custom Bookmarks (or, just Ctrl+B) → Create, and VLC will create a bookmark at the current position (displayed in images below). I've heard of some complains about it, but it's worth giving it a try. How to do it (images): To actually navigate to the bookmark, simply click on it from Playback → ...


5

KMPlayer is the perfect media player for this (and for everything else :). I switched from VLC to this a year ago, because of the (simple) bookmark feature, and you can play any format of video. To bookmark, 2 options: right click > bookmark press p Features: free runs on Windows 2000 (I think) and over. can play any media format can add bookmarks ...


5

Use MX Player for Android.You can even start the audio from the first or resume it from the last time where you have stopped it. It also works for video files.


4

I see you've been having trouble. Check out PotPlayer. Supports Windows 8 perfectly, too. :) http://www.videohelp.com/tools/PotPlayer


4

VLC for Android Audio files are played even when you lock the device. Video files are paused, however, you can play a video file as an audio file, so that you retain the former behavior. Likewise, this implies that you cannot watch the video itself. Instruction: Go into the video section of VLC. Long-touch a video and select "Play as audio".


4

Foobar2000 should support gapless playback - its supposed to work for lossless tracks, and WAV is, well not compressed, so is as lossless as they come. You'll likely need to create a playlist with a single track, and pick "Repeat(Track)" under Playback. You might also consider converting it to flac and playing around with metadata as suggested here, if that ...


4

I think VideoLAN VLC has it all: Simple, fast and powerful media player. Plays everything: Files, Discs, Webcams, Devices and Streams. Plays most codecs with no codec packs needed: MPEG-2, DivX, H.264, MKV, WebM, WMV, MP3... Runs on all platforms: Windows, Linux, Mac OS X, Unix... Completely Free, no spyware, no ads and no user ...


4

VLC is the ultimate media player. Install the Ubuntu default repository version: sudo apt install vlc Install the latest version (has Blu-ray support): sudo snap install vlc How to make a playlist: http://smallbusiness.chron.com/play-multiple-videos-vlc-49395.html UPDATE: Same deal applies What you can do is run VLC in single instance mode and run ...


3

Podkicker Podcast Player is free; Podkicker Pro is cheap; and both are rated 4 stars or better on Google Play. I'm currently subscribed to around 35 podcasts and I typically have in excess of 1GB of audio downloaded/managed by the app on my Nexus 7. Features I like/use: Pause point for each podcast is saved/maintained separately Pause/stop on the Android ...


3

My choice would be Guayadeque Music Player Guayadeque is included in Ubuntu repositories and can be installed through Ubuntu Software centre (source: ubuntu.com) Requested features: Guayadeque supports dynamic or static play lists. Guayadeque comes with sys-try applet and have ability to change song from taskbar Album covers can be downloaded manually ...


3

I'd advise XBMC. It scans local files (movies, episodes or music), 'scrapes' them for information (gets information about them from various websites), and displays them in a nice interface. Examples of its default look: Home Screen TV-Shows view There are multiple layouts to choose from, if the default doesn't satisfy you. And if you want to give it a ...


3

I would suggest using VCL from VideoLAN as it is free, cross platform and describes almost exactly the usage you suggest.


3

To remember the last played position in an audio track you can use VLC player with VLC srpos plugin: free and open source Windows remember the last played position on a per file basis, not just the last played file


3

Have a look at Mortplayer https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=de.stohelit.audiobookplayer It remembers the last point played in each file, has exact times stamp searching as well as skip forward/back by set amounts. I've been using it for a few years on Windows Mobile, Blackberry and now Android and it's the best I've found.


3

MX Player This player has a 'Background play' option (under 'Player' in the settings) that does exactly what you want. I just tested it on my Lenovo Yoga 10 HD+, it kept playing the audio after I hit the power button to kill the screen.


3

You can use smplayer, its a freeware, open-source project based on mplayer, a very robust and fast media player. It's available for Windows and Linux. You can configure the seek time through its configuration panel to whatever amount fits your needs. Also, it's a very easy to use, fast, lightweight and configurable tool to watch videos.


3

You can do that using Movavi video editor. Here is the link to tutorial on how to split videos into a single window. If you want to do that online for Youtube videos,you can use SwigView


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