Hot answers tagged

19

There's no single replacement for Matlab in Linux. Matlab is really huge software package, including quite large library ecosystem. Octave is one free alternative for Matlab. It's missing quite a few features, but all basics are there. I have used both, but it's rather hard to give good evaluation based on my own feelings. This page lists some minor ...


16

Octave as Olli said Ocatave is a matlab alternative: Notable Features (shared with matlab): Syntax near identical. it will consume almost all m-files without changes. the mfile is also its default format. The syntax is so identical that my university's matlab course uses octave in the autograder, even though the unit is taught entirely in matlab and only ...


16

Another great alternative is: https://www.symbolab.com/ It has also got a premium area, but its step-by-step solutions are free. Example Screenshot:


11

I know this isn't free, but the Wolfram Alpha mobile phone app has a one-time cost of $2.99 (at least on Android) and offers step-by-step solutions without needing a Pro account.


9

You can use GeoGebra: Free (+ portable version available) Works with Windows/Mac/Linux (even Android/iPhone/Windows Phone as well as in Google Chrome) has some Measurement Tools


9

I would recommend Scilab as I have used it and found it to be a decent open-source alternate for MATLAB. It doesn't have the robustness and polish of a professional package, but since it's based on the MATLAB language, what you'll learn can be transferred later on if your needs change, or you find yourself working in an environment where MATLAB is the ...


7

Take a look at Julia: http://julialang.org/ Julia is designed for numerical scientific work, including interactive work. It has a good quality notebook interface available like Mathematica and Sage. It has best-in-class performance, check out the benchmarks on the front page. It can call Python, which opens up lots of useful libraries for it. Julia has ...


7

You don't need to install any tool to calculate this. For example this page has JavaScript code that calculates an arbitrary number of pi decimals, up to 9999. I validated it against this Python program, and it gave the same results. For some reason, it gives five additional digits, but those are on a separate line, so snipping it out is rather easy. ...


6

Maxima is a system for the manipulation of symbolic and numerical expressions. The Maxima source code can be compiled on many systems, including Windows, Linux, and MacOS X. The source code for all systems and precompiled binaries for Windows and Linux are available at the SourceForge file manager.


6

SymPy Gamma is a free web application based on SymPy. It returns step-by-step solutions for some types of high school / college math problems, for example: Find the derivative of x*sin(x)**2 Integrate x*sin(3*x) Integrate x**2/(x**2+1) It's rougher around the edges and the syntax is a bit more rigid than WolframAlpha's. One can use ^ instead of ** for ...


5

You could use MathJax. It's a free, opensource, purely Javascript library for rendering math equations. Stack Exchange uses it (that's how I heard of it). It supports input through LaTeX and MathML according to it's site (I've only used the LaTeX input). It looks like it has everything you want.


5

If you don't need exact compatibility with Matlab, Freemat is an option. http://freemat.sourceforge.net/ It can be quite fast, as it uses LLVM as a JIT compiler. http://freemat-blog.blogspot.com/2008/02/why-jit-how-to-jit.html Freemat has had an integrated GUI for longer than Octave, although Octave's GUI has been getting better. The main drawback is ...


5

QuickPI is a Windows only command line tool that will generate pi to arbitrary length up to 256 million decimal places. It will optionally write this output to a text file. By entering this command: qpi 1mi -fancy:100,100,1000000,,no, pi.txt I was able to generate the following output: QPI-QuickPi v4.0, (c) 2000-2005 S. Pagliarulo Freely distributable, ...


5

I would like to recommend free MATLAB based software that implements a new visualization technique for polyhedra. It is called "boundary interval method", and its primary purpose is to depict polyhedra determined by inequality systems, i.e. exactly your problem. The link to the relevant web-page is http://www.nsc.ru/interval/sharaya/index.html#codes and ...


5

You can use GNU Octave: gratis cross-platform support nonlinear optimization


5

A quick check with python3.6 64 bit: In [13]: n = 1234*10**40000 In [14]: len(str(n)) Out[14]: 40004 In [15]: m = n + 1 In [16]: m-n Out[16]: 1 If you need really big integer numbers with no loss of accuracy you can use python under jupyter, (this gets round the command prompt memory limitations by working in a browser).


4

You can use GeoGebra: Free (+ portable version available) Since GeoGebra 4 it's possible to change the grid type to polar Works with Windows/Mac/Linux (even Android/iPhone/Windows Phone as well as in Google Chrome)


4

Some of the questions you posted can be solved by linear simultaneous equations technique. Sequalator is a software which can solve linear simultaneous equations for you. It can not only tackle thousands of equations in a fraction of a second but also provides some unique tools that let you analyse the solutions of your equations. And the best part is that ...


4

Not quite a collaborative whiteboard but a couple of resources that I think will be invaluable in the distance learning/teaching field. All of them are free and cross platform. Google Docs allows collaborative working and you can insert equations, etc. iPython Notebooks allow you to mix runnable code, charts, text, rich media & maths: nbViewer allows ...


4

One good alternative is: http://gamma.sympy.org/ It doesn't show steps for factoring but it does show steps for more complicated things in Calculus like derivatives and integrals.


4

SymPy I've been really liking the SymPy in Julia. I haven't used the underlying module in Python, much. Using it within in IJulia/IPython, for a Mathematica notebook like experience. It is technically a library, but it is very well suited to interactive use in the notebook. symbolic calculation capabilities. Yes. It also interacts nicely with numpy (in ...


4

There is a whole field of software called OCR or optical character recognition. Omnipage regular or Pro from nuance has always worked well for me. It can usually handle anything I throw at it. If recognition is poor use a higher DPI in scanning, I usually use 600, but on tiny fonts I use 1200dpi. Omnipage cost money, but you get what you pay for. Over ...


4

This can be done with OpenCV and some custom code in C or python, (it is not a very common requirement). The answers to this question do a great job of discussing how to go about this in C. For a ready rolled solution you might wish to take a look at NEFI:


4

As with so many things internet, it's all a matter of getting the right search terms. I used “unlimited canvas app iphone,” but then changed it to “infinite canvas app iphone.” The results are many and your decision will be based on how well you like the interface. I played with one that appeared to be capable, easily understood for things like dragging ...


4

If you don't mind using your browser and the Internet, Wolfram Alpha is a good choice. It's free to use and handles arbitrary-precision numbers.


3

Math.js The JavaScript part “Math.js is an extensive math library for JavaScript and Node.js.” — Project readme It provides a parse() function. Example using the NodeJS environment: var math = require('mathjs')(); var ast = math.parse('xy^(1/2)'); // Fully log the object var util = require('util'); console.log(util.inspect(ast, {showHidden: ...


3

The symbolic and numeric calculation package Maxima appears capable of doing this rather easily. This is an open source (GPL) software project, available from Sourceforge. I used the Xmaxima console for this result: (%i1) bfloat(%pi),fpprec:1000; <enter> (%o1) 3.1415926535897932384626433832795028841971693993751058209749445923078164\ ...


3

Primpoly I just found binaries (and sourcecode) for a program which generates a primitive polynomial of degree n modulo p. You can also test a given polynomial for primitivity and find all primitive polynomials. The program is called “Primpoly”, Version 11.0. A sample run from the command line: c:\primpoly.exe 2 200 Primpoly Version 11.0 - A Program ...


3

You can use GNU Octave: free works with Windows/Macintosh/Linux has a GUI since Octave 3.8


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible