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32

I wrote a simple python script to draw convnet, with adjustable parameters. https://github.com/gwding/draw_convnet It might be useful to you, if you just need some simple/non-fancy illustration. It copies the style of Figure 2 in "gradient based learning applied to document recognition"


18

I would suggest Texworks. I use it under Ubuntu, but it's available for OSX and Windows as well. Cross-platform compatibility is always a plus. When you press the green 'Typeset' button it refreshes the PDF, which is shown alongside the code (in a separate window you can position yourself). (You may need to run it twice, since the BibTeX file is (re)...


13

I wrote an in-browser tool for this as well: NN-SVG and you can find the source here. Choose from FCNN layout, LeNet layout, and AlexNet layout.


7

Emacs (with the AUCTeX macro package) is a good LaTeX editor. To recompile your document, press Ctrl+C Ctrl+C Enter (you can define a one-key shortcut if you want). All modern PDF viewers automatically reload the PDF file when it changes. I'm not familiar with PSX, but it seems that Skim performs better than the built-in PDF viewer, including pdfsync ...


7

For a thesis or any other large, complex document, my own preference is to use approach it like a piece of software. This means usually: My text (.tex) and presentation (.sty) files are separate. My text is broken down into smaller pieces for easier navigation and editing. I likely have a "backbone" .tex file which includes the pieces in order (by chapter, ...


7

I would recommend TexMaker. With one-key-press compilation and a good looking/intuitive GUI, TexMaker is the software for you. Plus, the wizard is really helpful. Texmaker includes wizards for the following tasks: Generate a new document or a letter or a tabular environment. Create tables, tabulars, figure environments, and so forth. Export a LaTeX ...


6

As moose pointed out in the comments, Table is probably the best thing out there. After hand-filling a table (note you can import and export tables from numerous other cool, handy formats, including csv, Markdown, markup, Mathematica...), lets: Invert it Add bars and borders You can also sort things alphanumericaly, and other convenient options are ...


6

I've installed Texpad ($19.99) a while ago and I really love it. It's a native Cocoa application, so it works much smoother than most cross-platform (Java) applications. They have a Mac app which I use mostly, but there's also a universal iOS app, so you can even work on your iPad or iPhone on the go. Both apps offer support for their own paid cloud service ...


6

pdfcrop Have you checked out pdfcrop? See: http://manpages.ubuntu.com/manpages/gutsy/man1/pdfcrop.1.html It is described in more details here: https://askubuntu.com/questions/124692/command-line-tool-to-crop-pdf-files krop krop is what I love to use: http://arminstraub.com/software/krop I use the GUI, but it can be run via CLI as well - maybe that is ...


5

Check out LyX. It is a cross-platform, open source LaTeX document processor which: Can be made to update / refresh. Not only auto-completes but will basically write all of your LaTeX commands. You can still edit them directly. Can automatically handle references. Check out some of the pre-made templates. It will warn you about errors, and give details on ...


5

TexStudio is a LaTeX editor with built-in spell checker. free / open-source cross-platform (QT based) powerful editor with code completion built-in PDF viewer Tools - Check Spelling or Shift+Ctrl+F7 unfortunately you have to check files one by one


4

I feel kind of weird answering my own question in this site. So just in case I'll just leave a disclaimer saying that I do NOT work for or know anyone that works with the developers of this app. After some searching I found that what works best for me are the TeXpert and TeXPortal apps. Both are developed by lameandroidhero. Intro TeXPortal is a LaTeX ...


4

Since you need an image output only, the Daum Equation Editor may be worth a try. It's a browser-based WYSIWYG LaTeX editor that allows you to save LaTeX equations as .png images. Here's a sample screenshot of the editor: And here's a sample .png image saved by it:


4

I think Kile is a good option for you. It runs on all three major OS (Windows, Mac and Linux) and my experience is that the Linux and Windows version are equally good, so I expect the same for the Mac version. Refreshing of the PDF is automatic after standard recompilation with Alt-6 (if the PDF is still open) or you can have a new PDF pop up after ...


4

Can I suggest that if it is only you and a few colleagues editing it then the way to go might be not a Wiki but rather a number of Jupyter/iPython notebooks, version controlled with git or mercurial and shared using a service such as GitHub or BitBucket. Jupyter/[iPython] will give you: Support for Markdown, Latex & MathJax Graphing/Plotting Accessing ...


4

I would recommend TeXstudio. TeXstudio is an integrated writing environment for creating LaTeX documents. Our goal is to make writing LaTeX as easy and comfortable as possible. Therefore TeXstudio has numerous features like syntax-highlighting, integrated viewer, reference checking and various assistants. For more details see the features. ...


4

I would strongly recommend trying the Jupyter notebooks environment with one of several plotting libraries that support animation. This combination lets you combine, on a single notebook page, text formatted with markdown, formulae with latex or mathjax, plots & graphs, etc. nice example here. Amongst the plotting tools that support animation there are:...


3

You mentioned toward the end that you're at least open to the idea of Web-based collaborative editing, so in case you haven't already checked it out, I recommend writeLaTeX. It offers (to my taste) a good balance of ease of use for the TeX-uninitiated (which includes me) and genuine LaTeX capabilities. It can be used as a browser-based editor with real-...


3

Personally I would suggest: Use (pandoc extended) markdown for the actual files and pandoc to produce the final output - this will handle UTF-8 with no problem and gives you the option of multiple output formats. The pandoc extensions to markdown support document metadata (title, author, date); footnotes; tables; definition lists; superscript and ...


3

You can use InftyReader: free generate LaTeX from images of math formulas (source image files must be in TIF, PNG, or GIF formats) far from perfect in terms of accuracy, but I'm not aware of better. Other ideas.


3

If the way via an intermediate CSV file is OK, I suggest the following workflow: Conversion from Excel to CSV Use xlsx2csv, a python script which is small, efficient and fast. In the most easiest case (Excel file with one sheet) you could get away with the command line: python xlsx2csv.py data.xslx data.csv Conversion from CSV to Markdown Use csvtomd, ...


3

I use TexStudio. It has the advantage to click just one button ">>" to create the document. It has an integrated PDF viewer. It remembers which way you use to translate the Latex document and it does it as often as it is necessary to get all compiling done. It contains autocomplete functions for Latex commands and autocomplete Bibtex support. A highlight ...


3

Finally i found the perfect thing : Typora You can write your document live with markdown and pandoc support ( so latex is supported!). The best software I ever found to write my domcuments!


2

If you want to make sure there are no delays, I recommend you to put the workload of rendering to the client. Libraries such as MathJax/jsMath allow you to render the Latex code directly in the visitor's browser. This has the nice side effect that this content is accessible for screen readers that do not support to display pictures.


2

My OS X Latex editor of choice has always been TeXShop. I wrote several papers using this tool and I found it easier than other popular editors I tried such as for example Kile which was recommended here, as well. TeXShop is a rather plain editor considering its user interface. It does not try to hide the Latex from you in order to give you a what you see ...


2

You can use LyX: Free and open source cross-platform WYSIWYG or source edit some nice options to edit the tables (see the LyX documentation) , but it's still pretty rudimentary:


2

I would suggest using a markdown editor that has baked in LaTex inside of it My personal favorite at the moment is app.classeur.IO Here's a demonstration of copying a wikipedia quantum physics formula into app.classeur.io Instead of using Latex style Table of contents navigation, app.classeur.io runs pandoc which can automate a lot of those processes. It ...


2

JabRef is a BibTeX bibliography manager: freeware / open-source Java based, so it is cross-platform reference management can send \cite key directly to TexStudio, LyX editors has a LibreOffice/OpenOffice plugin It doesn't directly do what you want (it may have an import plugin but I don't know exactly). However it has a nice online search feature that can ...


2

I've recently (today) started using Tiddlywiki, and I'm considering moving some of my shorter notes there from Git because of its interesting format. I think it fits your requirements, particularly because you could either host it on your Dropbox or Drive accounts, or on their service, and edit it using any browser. It's disadvantage, in my opinion, is that ...


2

There are quite a few but the one I would recommend is ChkTeX. From the web page: Supports over 40 warnings. Warnings include: Commands terminated with space. Ignores ``\tt\'', etc. Space in front of references instead of ``~''. Forgetting to group parenthesis characters when sub-/superscripting. Italic correction (``/'') mistakes (double, missing, ...


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