Hot answers tagged

24

I have written Huge JSON viewer based on JSON.NET, one of the fastest JSON frameworks. It matches the requirements as follows: open decently large files: it can open the 1.44 GB example file without crashing in ~ 2:45 minutes on my machine (Intel Core i7, 16 GB RAM, SSD). To do that, the OS must be 64 bit. A progress bar is shown has a decently responsive ...


10

I found two Java libraries that can diff two JSON strings and tell what was added, deleted, and modified. Both libraries generate output in accordance with RFC 6902 (JSON Patch): zjsonpatch fge json-patch zjsonpatch is better because it can detect items being inserted/removed from arrays. Fge json-patch cannot handle that - if an item is inserted into ...


9

My open source online json diff tool should do the trick: http://json-diff.com


8

I'm using JSONedit, typically with 1-2MB of text. Largest data sets I've tested were around 50MB and it's annoyingly slow with loading it and peak RAM usage reaches few hundreds MB - there is definitely room for improvement, but it's at least order of magnitude better than browser-based editors I've tested. It seems to meet most of your requirements except ...


4

You can try using json-minify: npm install -g json-minify create a new file watcher in WebStorm, like: Program: /path/to/json-minify/exec, like C:\Users\user.name\AppData\Roaming\npm\json-minify.cmd Arguments: $FileName$ Working dir: $FileDir$ Output paths to refresh: $FileNameWithoutExtension$.minified.json Make sure to tick 'Create output file from ...


4

Just whipped a quick dirty up: fiddle css: ul { margin-left: 1em; } .json-key { font-weight: bold; } .ui-icon { float:left; margin-right:3px; } .childless { margin-left:18px; } JavaScript: function visitObj($container, obj) { var $ul = $('<ul>'); for (var prop in obj) { var $li = $('<li>...


4

First thought: Cannot PHP do that itself? Just citing from my memory: $json_file = '/path/to/file.json'; /* dynamically set the name of your JSON file here */ file_put_contents($json_file, /* Write back to disk */ json_encode( /* Re-Encode to JSON */ json_decode( /* Decode original JSON object */ ...


4

I recently found json-delta at https://pypi.python.org/pypi/json-delta/ You can install on your computer with command pip install json-delta To use it, just use the command json_diff -u file1.json file2.json


3

When researching for an answer to this question, besides a variant over using SemanticMerge as my suggested answer for "Diff tool for XML Files", I found another tool which claims to be context aware for a few programming languages: Compare++, which brags about the following: Compared with other file comparison tools, the great process made in Compare++ ...


3

You can use JSToolNpp: open source (GPL 2.0) javascript plugin for Notepad++ (formerly JSMinNpp) can open file up to 100 MB (I haven't tried larger yet) has a responsive UI can collapse/expand a given level (treeview / outline)


3

If I understand you well, you're looking for something like JSONmate. You can edit the JSON in various ways: like a text file: with a prettier presentation: As a bonus, you also have a graph representation of your JSON architecture:


3

pretty-json does exactly that and is under the following licence: I dont think too much about licence just feel free to do anything you want... :-) A demo can be seen here.


3

Python is: Free, Gratis & Open Source including commercial use Available for windows, along with just about everything else, although recent versions have dropped Windows XP support. Can definately be command line driven Has a built in csv module/library that can output various dialects of csv file. Has a built in json module/library that can read and ...


3

Since you are in a Windows environment have you considered PowerShell? It meets all of your criteria and you already have it available (no need to install anything). This command will do what you want: # With headers (Get-Content -Path $pathToJsonFile | ConvertFrom-Json) ` | ConvertTo-Csv -NoTypeInformation ` | Set-Content $pathToOutputFile # Without ...


3

Sublime Text is a cross-platform proprietary editor that similar to Atom but with better performance. Plugin are written in Python instead of JavaScript. There is also a plug-in called Pretty JSON, but I'm not sure about its relationship with the Atom plugin.


3

Visual Studio Code (https://code.visualstudio.com/) is lighter than Atom and provides similar amount of plugins.


3

It's so annoying that after I posted this question, I vaguely recalled the name and found it. It's weird how having to describe something you are looking for in written text helps with memory brain cells. For anyone interested in this elegant and humble application, its called: http://myjson.com/


2

It seems like I met the same problem some time ago and also did not found a solution. So I've created my own tool to iterate over JSON schema and object. You may take a look at it here It allows to write your own processors the following way: var s = require('schemasaurus'); var it = s.newIterator({...your schema... }, function () { return { //...


2

As Izzy mentioned, it is kind of tough to tell what you're looking for, but I think I might have a solution for you. ZingChart is a native JavaScript charting library that can be used to build quite robust dashboards. It was explicitly built for big data sets and takes JSON by default. Here's a tutorial for loading in external JSON. I'm on the ZingChart ...


2

As with most JavaScript visualizations, you can use the JavaScript library D3.js (BSD license), it contains some function to: draw a scatterplot display information about the point you picked Drag + Zoom If the scatterplot takes too long to load because of the size of the data, you can use progressive rendering.


2

I don't know what you mean with bulk operations on JSON path but doesn't provide JSONBuddy all of this?


2

Disclaimer: I'm the author of JSONBuddy. JSONBuddy can do all of this for you and even more: Can open and edit very large JSON and text data (please use the Plus edition if you need to edit multi-GB text files). Grid view in addition to the standard text editor. Built-in JSON validator and syntax-checking. Entry-helpers based on schema context. A JSON ...


2

Without the need for a specific application, if you just want to separate the wheat from the chaff, and have PHP installed on the Linux machine, you can use a simple one-liner for this: for json in folder/*; do php -r "if ( ! \$foo=json_decode(file_get_contents('$json')) ) echo \"$json\n\";"; done This would list all broken .json files in the directory ...


2

Found this free library on GitHub which I had used earlier. Log viewer converts the patch of text into individual blocks of json data for easy viewing of large logs of json files. Additionally the log viewer has various search functionality which is useful for such large logs debugging/extracting information. Software is distributed under MIT license. JSON ...


2

you may want to take a look at Json.hpp JSON library of jtc tool: it's an easy C++14 API, featuring DSL-like style for building JSON programmatically no dependancies, uses STL only written in idiomatic c++14 style, cross platform, thread safe, extensively debuggable features fast and powerful walk interface and iterators (easy to walk even irregular JSONs) ...


1

Check out Teleport API. Some of the images are not of great quality and choice of cities is limited but definitely worth a shot.


1

JSON's encoding rules are really, really simple. The majority of the effort involved in writing a JSON codec is to deal with the arbitrarily-recursive nature of objects and with organizing the representation of the output (e.g. sorting the keys, etc.). But in your case, with a streaming output engine, much (if not all) of that complexity goes away, and all ...


1

This might be useful: https://github.com/andreyvit/json-diff https://www.npmjs.com/package/json-diff It is a command line tool.


1

OK so I did have a go coding this myself. https://github.com/Antony74/TransportManager/blob/master/sys/server/GenerateProxyApiSourceCode.js This takes my core API (which consists of the functions 'selectSql', 'getIndices' and 'updateDatabase') and generates a proxy API from it (see below), which is written to a file and served up just like a static .js ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible