36

I like Netbeans. It's mainly a Java IDE, but it supports HTML5 and PHP as well and is platform independent. It has syntax highlighting and a autocomplete feature much like Visual Studio's "Intellisense" (yes, that's a Java example, I don't have a PHP one right this moment).


21

Please note that I had to split my answer into 3 parts, to comply with the new rules of Softwarerecs.SE: My private 2 cents… Geany My working 2 cents… Eclipse If you are able and willing to put money on the table… Zend Studio 1. My private 2 cents… Personally, I use Geany and have had good experiences with it. Geany provides a small and fast IDE that ...


21

If you are not keeping off from paid solutions you can check PHPStorm It is really powerful and fast - you can try trial version to ensure it suits your needs. According to this requirement there is extensive code completion working on various levels. There is albo powerful refactoring support and code analysis functions. Please take a look at features page


16

The best cross-platform, Non-IDE Code editor I've used as a PHP/JS Dev is Sublime Text. It's available for Windows, Linux, and OSX. It has an unlimited free trial. The full version is $70 USD. It has a huge library of addons which give it advanced features that make it hard for me to live without it. With add-ons and native features, it has things like... ...


15

A free cross platform solution is Aptana Studio 3 built on Eclipse. It has some awesome features like: Git and SVN support Boilerplate templates Project management FTP Support Screenshot:


15

Notepad++ is a simple one. It has great customizable highlighting (PHP, JS, CSS and HTML within one file - and more to choose from) and FTP plugin available for remote use. An obvious downside is that it's only available natively on Windows, but it should run fine through WINE. Code-hinting sometimes behaves a bit oddly, but other than that it's a great ...


13

I've used PHPDesigner for a couple of years (since version 7) and it has all of the features that you want and more. I've developed a bit of a love/hate relationship with it, though, so I'll go into my experiences using it. First, your constraints: It has FTP/SFTP support, password or key based It has code completion and built-in documentation lookup It ...


12

If you miss mandatory tools for a JavaScript developer then why don't you try NetBeans, a tool with syntax coloring and code completion support, including support for modern JavaScript frameworks like jQuery, JSON, Knockout, Ext Js, AngularJS, JsDoc, ExtDoc, and ScriptDoc. The images below are focused on those features you specified: Don't miss these ...


11

A free solution is PHP Development Tools for Eclipse. It includes code completion, syntax highlighting and since it runs on Java it's cross-platform. You can enable the web developer tools for Javascript support and there are plugins for FTP sync. I primarily use Eclipse for Java development but when I needed to do PHP it was nice to be able to download a ...


11

You can use Sublime Text which does Syntax Highlighting, Auto-completion, Source formatting, is organized by folder (which is pretty much a project) and can be used for web programming. It is free (the trial has no limit in time or features), works on Windows and a portable version is available. Sublime's interface is faster than Eclipse, however its ...


10

This is very new and I don't have much practical experience with it, but looks promising. Brackets Available for Windows and Mac Hinting/completion for HTML, JS and CSS (but not php) Syntax highlighting (doesn't work for inline php) Live preview on Chrome (really interesting, previews as you type) FTP Sync supported via extension. It's not something I'd ...


10

I'd suggest Adobe Brackets Javascript, HTML, CSS -- It was made for those languages. Syntax Highlighting, Auto-completion, Source formatting (for the above languages) -- All built in. 'Projects' where you can define project directories, and open all files you were last using on the project by opening a 'project' -- It opens the last file you were ...


8

I've given up using vim for Java Web development some years ago, cause it really needs a lot of tooling support (Intellij IDEA is very nice). I've had more success using vim for developing Grails applications, but I feel that for Java I really want strong refactoring tools. Having said that, if you really insist in using vim, here are some plugins that may ...


8

There is the YUI Dial control: http://yuilibrary.com/yui/docs/dial/ And the slider control: http://yuilibrary.com/yui/docs/slider/ you could probably start with that. They both have several different skins available from YUI (eg: http://yuilibrary.com/yui/docs/slider/#skins). The button control: http://yuilibrary.com/yui/docs/button/ can be used as a ...


8

There are several cross-platform, open-source HTML/CSS/JS desktop frameworks available. The most popular, in descending order: Electron "The Electron framework lets you write cross-platform desktop applications using JavaScript, HTML and CSS. It is based on Node.js and Chromium and is used by the Atom editor and many other apps." Actively developed ...


7

Have a look at GoJS It's a JavaScript library that ought to be able to do everything you expect with Diagrams: Use templates for Nodes, Links, and Groups, can be arbitrarily complex and include custom shapes/geometres Support for user-created links with arbitrary link validation With links, Orthogonal and Bezier link routing with "Avoids Nodes" and "Jump ...


7

I use vim myself, customized with some plugins (e.g. syntastic for code hinting, html5.vim & vim-javascript for improved HTML5 & JS support). But some friends of mine have been using Sublime and Komodo Edit for PHP/HTML/JS/CSS code editing with great success.


7

I'd recommend Sublime Text. Sublime has everything you would expect in a minor IDE or an amazing text editor and yet is very very light. Pretty much any area that you want to have more features there is a simply massive plugin library. Sublime Text is not free but it on the cheap end of software, it also has a free unlimited trial so you can test it and ...


7

You can use Netbeans, which does Syntax Highlighting, Auto-completion, Source formatting, is organized by project and can be used for web programming. It is free, works on Windows and can be made portable.


7

It's still in early development, but you might want to look at Atom: Javascript, HTML, CSS - Supports all of these. Syntax Highlighting, Auto-completion, Source formatting (for the above languages) Supports all of these functions. 'Projects' where you can define project directories, and open all files you were last using on the project by opening a 'project'...


7

Since you already have some experience using AngularJS, it may make sense to continue use of that framework for your new app. Angular is one of the most popular JavaScript frameworks for good reason, and it's not just due to Google's support. Indeed, compared to other frameworks, Angular is considered to be one of the easier ones to begin using. Let's look ...


7

Have you checked out ZingChart? It meets a majority of your requirements. The current build is compatible with IE6+, along with other modern browsers. It can render using canvas and svg. (VML and Flash for legacy browsers). While there is no direct support for native charts, ZingChart does work on mobile browsers. If it is an option, both Android and iOS ...


6

Brackets I started using it a few days ago -- so far, so good. It's more focused on the front-end, but it has extensions to work with node.js in the back-end too. Some of its selling points (from its webpage): Live HTML Development As you code, HTML changes are instantly pushed to browser without having to save or reload the page. JS Debugging with ...


6

Take a look into JetBrains WebStorm. It's a fully focused IDE for web development, and is full of modules and plugins for develop JS using the most commons frameworks, like Angular, etc.


6

Please note that I had to split my answer into 3 parts, to comply with the new rules of Softwarerecs.SE: My private 2 cents… Geany My working 2 cents… Eclipse If you are able and willing to put money on the table… Zend Studio 2. My working 2 cents… At my current workplace, company policy states we have to use Eclipse -- to be more exact: PHP-Eclipse. ...


6

Please note that I had to split my answer into 3 parts, to comply with the new rules of Softwarerecs.SE: My private 2 cents… Geany My working 2 cents… Eclipse If you are able and willing to put money on the table… Zend Studio 3. If you are able and willing to put money on the table… Since you didn't mention a price-tag… I would like to add that some ...


6

Maybe not the greatest solution ever, but the cheapest one if measured by required effort is conversion of your Access database to SQL Server, preferably to Microsoft SQL Server. In Microsoft Access'97 and 2000 there was even a tool called Upsizing Wizard doing exactly this thing. Most important facts: MS SQL Server is free until it runs single CPU core ...


6

You can use GNU wget: free and open source Linux, Windows, Mac (brew install wget) CLI To download all remote assets js,css into local machine in a batch, you can use wget --page-requisites http://turbo.themezilla.com/memo/ --page-requisites: This option causes Wget to download all the files that are necessary to properly display a given HTML page. ...


6

While the (previously) accepted answer was correct, in the intervening years the industry has gone ahead by leaps and bounds... Two very good open-source and extremely actively developed options are Electron, by GitHub. Lets you build cross-platform Windows, MacOS, and Ubuntu applications from HTML/JavaScript/CSS. It works by embedding them into a Chromium ...


5

node-webkit It allows using HTML 5, CSS 3, JavaScript (including NodeJS APIs!) It packages all the content into one bundle. It supports Windows Linux Mac OS X


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