5

I've played with Phabricator a little bit, but it's been over a year. It seems to have set its sights high with lots of components and functionality.


5

TRAC has wiki, bug tracker, code viewer, all with markup to interlink. Or, there is its fork Apache Bloodhound. All written in Python, plenty of plugins. Very mature. BTW Trac wiki is much closer to original idea, plain text with markup. Easier to parse from outside to create plugins.


5

I would consider evaluating the Atlassian stack, which is for me the most valuable out there: JIRA + Fisheye + Confluence will be a perfect match. Fisheye can connect to either SVN or Git repositories Links: JIRA Fisheye Confluence Disclaimer: I don't work for Atlassian. I use all these tools actively, daily, and develop plugins for JIRA since 4 years, ...


4

With self-hosted at least being an option, I recommend taking a look at Trac. It can be run via e.g. Apache or Nginx, and is build using Python – fully open source, you can adjust it to your very needs. Let's see how your requirements are met: Possibility to choose the type of the case: bug, feature, inquiry, schedule item or others: Some of these are ...


4

You could try GitLab which is a complete source code management, issue tracker and wiki. Although this is slightly more than you wanted, the issue tracker covers everything you need. It supports: Unlimited free private projects (maximum 10GB per project) Fully hosted Tagging issues (this can also be used to mark type of case) Filtering by tag Adding ...


4

Have you considered Sirportly? As far as I am aware, there's no AD integration, but it's close to what you're asking for, although it doesn't support free and self hosted at once. Features from your list It can be self-hosted, although this has a one off fee of £349 for a 10 user licence. it's web based supports multiple brands, departments, custom ticket ...


3

It sounds like you are looking for ReviewBoard. Interfaces with multiple version control systems Syntax highlighted code, (in 300 languages), in diffs Smart handling of indentation changes Documentation review as well as code Moved code detection Issue Tracking Lots of notification options Lots of reporting options


3

Yet, another alternative you should consider is Trello. With a programming background, you may be familiar with the Agile/Scrum and Kanban methodologies. Trello steals from that by providing “boards” that represent a “project”. As with Agile, etc., you can creates tasks, collaborate, and update the state of your “projects”. Trello also borrows the ...


3

Have you considered Jitbit Helpdesk? [NB: I'm affiliated with this company, so I'm not going to provide any review since I'm naturally biased] Basically it fulfils all your requirements (self-hosted, supports LDAP/AD, web-based, etc.) It's a paid app, but the trial version is free and not time-limited, so you can "test" as long as you need.


3

I'm using Trac for this kind of job (see my answer here for details): Version control integration (SVN preferred): Definitely. I'm using it with SVN, but other VCSs (e.g. git) are also supported. Tickets support custom fields, including search and filter: Yes. And more, like master tickets/dependencies, tags, ... Different types of tickets can go through ...


2

I'm a bit surprised no one has mentioned JIRA yet. It's very widely used so it's familiar to many. Answers to your requirements: must support >20 projects, better no cap at all A JIRA Server commercial/academic/starter license entitles you to Unlimited projects and issues. must run on Linux server or provided by dedicated hoster Supported platforms ...


2

You can have a look at HelpDeskPilot They are Self hosted Web based ( can be accessed via a browser ) Support multiple categories ( like sales@example.com, support@example.com, Marketing@example.com) Email Notifications for New tickets, Tickets that has crossed the due dates, SLA breaches, and many other custom notifications. LDAP & Active Directory ...


2

Everything GitHub will do (including Git hosting) or everything GitHub Issues (only the issue tracking system) will do? In the first case it seems to be impossible. In the second case, my suggestion is to use Trello as the ticketing system -- which provides Arbitrary labelling/tagging Organization of each ticket (in Trello the tickets will be represented ...


2

That's simple - GitLab - i know you're looking at another direction, but if you think about it, GitLab has great implementation opportunities beyond building software. It has most of the features listed, as its aim is to address broad list of use cases, covering the entire project life-cycle. You can check about.gitlab.com/features for an extensive overview. ...


2

Have you considered Google Keep: Store notes, tasks, images, etc. Reminders including repeated items Lists of tasks, etc., can have tick boxes and can be re-ordered Items can be shared with collaborators Web, Chrome, iOS & Android Apps Items ticked off in one App or by one collaborator are shown as done in all. Light weight. Free While it doesn't track ...


2

Many, if not all, of the trackers and wikis that I have encountered allow anonymous access if you decide to enable it - the reasons that this is rarely done are a) traceablitly, b) feedback & c) the amount of low quality/dubious content that such services rapidly accumulate otherwise. To enable such access you, as administrator of the tracker or wiki, ...


2

I have been using Pivotal Tracker, which is extremely lightweight but allows you track user stories, bugs and chores. It has some integration with github available as well. The interface (web based) is very clean. They also have a decent iOS app. There is some basic reporting. The downside is that epics are little more than an aggregation tag.


2

You could always use git itself! Have a directory called bugs and one called feature_requests, when you get a request create a new bug or feature request as a markdown or rst file, you could use a sequential numbering or more complex and then check it in, when it is finished add the details to the file including which release it is due in and check in ...


2

I'm using Gitea here for a similar purpose. It's like a "mini Github", letting you maintain your Git repos together with issues and wikis (you can even mirror remote ones with it). It's lightweight and easy to use and fast responding (I have it running on my BananaPi, it uses almost no resources), and can easily deal with multiple projects (and also multiple ...


2

Have you already considered using Jira Service Desk instead? It's giving your non-tech users a different view on the issues but your tech users can still work with your issues using the regular view. And you can then link your Jira Service Desk issues with your "internal" Jira issues, so you have a direct connection between them. Since you're already using ...


1

Full disclosure: I am the founder & CEO of Comb Comb was built for teams that value efficiency. The primary focus is on a prioritized task list, and getting through that list. Comb assigns work to team members (when they request work) based on the priority list, along with a set of user-defined rules that allow work to flow through the team in a way ...


1

We used Github for a while and then Gitlab. Github is more popular and intuitive but more expensive for private projects. Gitlab is more cumbersome and slow but free for all projects and has more out-of-the-box features (but size limit on each project). They both are based around Git but I don't think they support SVN though. You could check that article if ...


1

I use redmine for such things. It has issue tracking, you can create a "project" for each customer, then any logins they have are members of only that project. There are places for wikis and for files so you can upload and they can download.


1

Feel free to check out Planio which has all of the required features + concierge level customer support. Planio is based on the Open Source project Redmine and we're one of its major contributors. We've been running since 2009 and serve over 1,500 customers now. We're a sustainable, bootstrapped and owner-operated company, so we won't go anywhere anytime ...


1

I'd like to recommend osTicket. It's an open source ticket system and can be run on your own server (just using PHP & MySQL). It's pretty simple but very powerful. It doesn't have its own app but it can be accessed by any device that has a browser. It has quite a few features too including, Custom Fields Rich Text HTML for Emails Ticket Filters Assign ...


1

There is a free and open source version of xTuple PostBooks ERP - you can use whatever modules you need, such as the integrated CRM - http://xtuple.com/products/postbooks - you can try the free version. CRM = universal address book, incident management (more than adequate for a ticketing system like you describe), opportunity management, to-do lists, ...


1

Have a look at either of these Drupal based solutions: Open Atrium. Erpal. Both solutions have an approach where you turn on the suboptions (apps or plugins if you want) that you're interested in, a ticketing system as you seem to be looking for is one of these suboptions. I believe it satisfies most of your criteria ... except for 1 possible showstopper ...


1

As the Visual Studio integration seems pretty important to you I would suggest looking into Visual Studio Online, which has the following to say about it self: It’s not an IDE, it’s everything else. Visual Studio Online provides a set of cloud-powered collaboration tools that work with your existing IDE or editor, so your team can work effectively on ...


1

I used to have a project management site I built with TRAC that had this capability. Here is one plugin that does this.


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