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16

Elby Virtual CloneDrive (Formally recommended SlySoft Virtual CloneDrive) gratis runs on Windows 2000/XP/XP64/VISTA/VISTA64/Win7/Win7-64/Win8/Win8-64/Win10 Note: I can confirm runs on Windows Server editions of 2003 and higher as well Virtual drive always appears in explorer windows (8 may use hide when empty) Supports right-click Eject System Tray icon ...


11

You can use Microsoft's own Virtual CD-ROM application. free runs on Vista eject works no tray icons when not running no virtual drive on Win Explorer when no image mounted It is an alternative to Disk Image Mount. The Virtual CD-ROM Control Panel utility enables users of Windows XP, Vista, and 7 to mount ISO disk image files as virtual CD-ROM drives. ...


10

WinCDEmu is a small utility that allows mounting disc images: freeware no interface; just open file with it and you see it mounted supports ISO, CUE, NRG, MDS/MDF, CCD, IMG does not show virtual drive when no image mounted no tray icon Eject is working


9

DAEMON Tools Lite 4 does: gratis runs on Windows Vista the right-click Eject function should work (no tray icons to unmount) no tray icon: convenient to manage many ISO files: does not: the virtual drive should only appear when an image is mounted Note: make sure that you skip the crapware when installing.


7

I'll presume the DVDs aren’t copy protected since they are in ISO format. My software to go considering your requirements would be HandBrake (runs on Ubuntu, Windows and Macs). Handbrake reads pretty much any format you throw at it. Note on Ubuntu: in case your DVD image is copy protected or won't play, you need to be sure that libdvdcss2 is installed. ...


4

ImDisk (open source) ImDisk is a more versatile application that allows you to mount basically anything as long as you have memory (for creating RAM disks) or an image file. The GUI front-end is not very good, but that's because it's just a driver. It also includes a command-line tool, a Control Panel applet, and a shell extension (right-click to mount ...


4

Except for two caveats (price and ISO see below) DVDFab will work great for that. The only functionality caveat: There is a chance it won't natively open ISO files (i.e. I can't remember) - in which case you would have to extract it to a dvd-video folder or mount it using for example PowerISO (Free unlimited time, limited functionality but enough for this ...


4

I would recommend DVDx DVDx is open source and available as a free trial on Linux, Windows, and OS X. DVDx can be used to decrypt and copy ISOs from or rip DVDs, HD-DVDs, and Blu-ray discs. DVDx supports ripping to many different formats out of the box including: avi flv h264 mkv mp4 webm DVDx does support burnt-in subtitles. As for size, the final ...


3

If you don't mind installing a Linux system on your flashdrive you can do this rather easily using the grml-rescueboot package. I used Lubuntu for it's small size and flexiblitly, installed the grml rescueboot package and dropped the ISO's I wanted to boot in the /boot/grml folder and ran sudo update-grub grml-rescueboot adds scripts to generate the menu and ...


3

You may try Brasero If you run Linux. If you are running Windows as OS then I recommend the lightweight ImgBurn is a powerful 100% free tool for burning CDs DVDs. If you don't like or have already tried ImgBurn the there is another one CDBurnerXP. It is also pretty lightweight and satisfactory in looks.(If you don't like the ImgBurn's interface)


3

InfraRecorder I'm assuming from your answer that your OS is Windows. On that, I use InfraRecorder. It: Has full-featured CD/DVD burning and image recording tools Is free and open source, not a shareware or freemium.


3

I guess you are basically looking for a way to create an ISO File on command line. Since you have PowerIso, you can use piso, which is PowerISO command line utility located in PowerISO installation directory.  PowerISO can not only creates ISO image file on Window GUI, but it also can creates ISO file on Windows command line. You can find piso.exe ...


2

My personal favorite for mounting ISO images is MagicDisk/MagicISO I'm using it on Windows XP (now Win7) for serveral years


2

Gizmo Drive is my favorite choice before Windows 8. It's a set of tools with additional add-ons if needed. One of the functions is virtual drive and it'll add as many drives as you mount. It can support not only ISO but lots of other formats including virtual hard drives. Mount ISO, BIN, CUE, NRG files to a virtual CD-ROM drive Mount VHD files, used ...


2

K9Copy can do that at least for DVDs: K9Copy (source: Wikipedia; click image for larger variant) It's main goal is to make DVD9 content fit onto a DVD5 (by e.g. re-encoding video, or drop unwanted audio tracks). The result is then saved to an .iso file. So if you don't "shrink" anything, you should get a 1:1 copy in the resulting ISO. Though development ...


2

CDBurnerXP Free Can create an ISO image from files and folders, which you add to your compilation by drag & drop See the manual for how to save a compilation as an ISO file. Warning: Be sure to download the Candy-free version of it in order to avoid adware! Click on “more dowload options” on the official download page.


1

You could use YUMI, it creates a good menu and places entrys for each Iso loaded! You can get it here for windows: YUMI multiboot pendrive It really works great with Linux distros and various rescue discs, so it should work with Windows OS'es too.


1

Though this is not a software recommendation, but - IODD hosts a lot of ISO images, bootable or not. Some models support also multiple "virtual disks". (Older USB2.0 models a.k.a. "Zalman Virtual CD emulator")


1

You can do this with most file archive applications including one called WinRAR. All you need to do is, Open WinRAR Naviagate and select the files and/or folders you want in the archive Click "Add" A window will popup, simply rename the file extension to ".iso" and make sure the archive format is set to "RAR"


1

try WhereIsIt http://www.whereisit-soft.com/ The software can search inside ISO files, removable media, archives, ... Also many plugins are available.


1

Use Total Commander with an ISO plugin. Then use Alt + F7 to search a directory tree. Specify your file name as *.iso and that's it. As a bonus, you can further refine your search - partial file name, created since a certain date, file size, only current directory, or X levels of sub-directories etc, etc


1

"run it smoothly", as you call it, is a highly subjective human concept, that doesn't mean much to a machine. How would a piece of software, like VirtualBox (or similar), know what you mean by "smooth" and what characteristics are required to run an OS "smoothly"? The parameters are so many and so varied that I doubt a software could figure it out by itself....


1

I use a command line tool, ddrescue, for this. I don't know how well it would work if the disc has any form of DRM but it worked fine for my old home videos that were burned to a DVD. sudo apt-get install gddrescue Then use this command to create an iso in the directory of your choice: ddrescue /dev/sr0 ~/isos/filename.iso Where /dev/sr0 is the path to ...


1

Note: Duplicate of https://askubuntu.com/questions/190133/what-are-the-alternatives-for-remastersys and https://askubuntu.com/questions/452022/remastersys-alternative See Pinguy Builder: The script creates a livecd of the installed system and works with *buntu. You can either make a distributable livecd or a backup of your system. Version 3.* works ...


1

here is an untested quick set of commands for windows xp commandline. instructions to use: open a command prompt change to root directory or drive (i.e - directory above folder 1, folder2, folder3 etc) copy and paste below commands set piso="%programfiles%\poweriso\piso.exe" for /f "usebackq" %a in (dir /b /ad) do %piso% create -o d:\%a.iso -add d:\%a ...


1

If you want to preserve the original quality or don't have much time to convert and don't mind about the size (which you probably don't, because you already store the discs in ISO format) then you can mount the ISO files and copy the whole disc or just the VIDEO_TS folder in the disc to the hard drive. In fact you can just copy the *.VOB files and open them ...


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