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Inkscape is an open source vector graphics program available for Linux, Mac and Windows. It supports raster to vector conversion using the Potrace bitmap tracing engine as documented in this tutorial. It supports at a minimum png input and SVG output. Here is sample output: Top row left to right: Photo Original (Credit Flower's.Lover, Licence CC BY 2.0), ...


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From my experience, vectormagic does an awesome job of this, though its not free - the web based version is $7.95 a month (or you can buy tokens for single conversions while the desktop version for windows and linux is roughly 300 US dollars. If its a one off thing, you can get 2 free conversions when you sign up on their site or buy tokens as needed (You ...


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1. ImageMagick This one is a command-line tool, available for Windows, Linux, and Mac OS X. To export layers separately to individual PNG files, you can run the following command after installing it: convert Boring.psd Cool.png That will result in Cool-0.png, Cool-1.png, etc. for each layer. For a flattened image you need to add the corresponding switch:...


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You can use GIMP (PSD format is documented) although you might lose some information in the process such as: Layer comps Layer effects (shadow, glow, etc) Vector objects Layer masks


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That should be possible using ImageMagick, which is available cross-platform (Linux, Mac, Windows). This software ships with a bunch of command-line utilities, perfectly fitting your needs. Let's give me an example: Say you've stored a bunch of your *.svg in the current directory, and want to convert them to *.png – that would be a one-liner: convert -...


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Adobe illustrator is rather good at vectorizing images as well. The built-in function for this is called Image Trace and it allows you to set a bunch of parameters that control how well paths and corners are followed, how small a group of pixels has to be to be considered noise and how many colors you want to use in the vectorized version. A down-side of ...


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Open SVG in browser and print the page to PDF. Not silent or command line so doesn't meet my requirements Use cmdlnprint $ firefox -print "URL" Addon for Firefox to automate printing using command line (silent printing). You can print to a normal printer configured at your system or print as a file (pdf, ps or png). And there are a billion ...


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You can use Inkscape (gratis, available on Linux, Mac, Windows). It has some export command line options, e.g. inkscape in.svg --export-png out.png.


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I have recently downloaded a new app for my Mac, Super Vectorizer. It does what you'd think, it turns rasters (non cuttable files) to Vectors (as in Silhouette Studio) and allows export to SVG or PDF Vector files. The really good thing about it is the simplicity. It opens fast, gives you a couple of options and then does the job. You can literally take ...


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You could use GIMP in combination with the Export Layers as PNG plugin. However, installing plugins in GIMP is not an easy task. Luckily I found another way of doing what you want: PSDParse by Telegraphics It... ... extracts all layers to png images ... doesn't flatten the psd file ... extracts all layers at the same time ... keeps the name of the layer .....


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ffmpeg should be able to do this. Refer to this answer on SO for details That answer references the command line, but ffmpeg is also available as a library if it's more convenient to you.


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Your absolute best bet is going to be Photoshop where you can go in and manually edit the picture pixel by pixel, if need be. There are also all kinds of sharpness/de-blur type of filters that you can use. You can get a trial of Adobe Creative Cloud here, and just download Photoshop. If you're looking for something completely free, try FastStone Image ...


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Creating PDF/A-2 including JPEG-2000 iText is a PDF library available in Java and C# that allows you to create PDFs that comply to the PDF/A-2 format. You can find some examples here. Note that you need the core iText library as well as the pdfa library as an addon to the core library. iText core supports JPEG2000 images. iText is released under the ...


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Inkscape can be found on the internet in portable format, and it allows you to convert any image to a vector image. You can do this by going Path > Trace Bitmap in the menu. But I have to admit it's not the most straightforward solution, because you have to do a series of steps to achieve the conversion. In overall: 1) yes, Inkscape is free 2) If you ...


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For people who want it to run truly headlessly, i.e. no X server, try wkhtmltopdf (note that Linux distro packages of it are missing some features, so download from their website). It was designed to work with HTML but uses QT WebKit and so should be able to render SVG. Run with wkhtmltopdf input.svg output.pdf. wkhtmltopdf also works with inputs located on ...


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I suggest using GIMP. It's free open-source software. Use the magic wand tool to select the parts of the image you want to surround. Then Select > Grow, to add the width of the border (e.g., 4px). Then Select > Border (e.g., 4px), to create a border selection. Next, pick white as the color you want to use with the fill tool (the bucket) that you can fill ...


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The LEADTOOLS SDK has .NET Core NuGet packages that support (among many other things) the conversion from Doc/Docx to image formats like GIF and PNG. (Disclaimer: I am an employee of this toolkit’s vendor). There’s a simplified ASP.NET project on our forums that implements HTML5 Image Gallery using ASP.NET Core MVC. The project contains code that converts ...


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This requirement can be achieved using Syncfusion Word Renderer and PDF Renderer. These NuGet packages are available in nuget.org NuGet package Required Syncfusion.DocIORenderer.Net.Core - for converting Word document to PDF Syncfusion.EJ2.PdfViewer.AspNet.Core.Windows - for converting PDF to Image We have created simple .NET Core web application for ...


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Any image converter (not minimal Image Editor, like paint) should give you quality options when converting the format, and if you choose the best quality you should be fine (although there definitely will be some loss of quality due to change it the compression type.) I'm using the CoffeeCup PixConverter which is free, easy to use, and has all kind of ...


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I use a cross platform app called Adapter. You can drop a collection of files on the app and it will convert them all to what you selected. Adapter can be found here.


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If you have experience using any Windows programming language, such as C# or VB.NET, you could use an advanced imaging library such as LEADTOOLS to easily perform the conversion in your own program (Disclaimer: I'm an employee of its vendor). If you'd like to try, there's a free evaluation edition on www.leadtools.com. Even if you're not a hard-core ...


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Adobe Reader Adobe Reader is a rather popular and fairly powerful pdf viewer. It has the option to scale pages to larger sized and tile them on separate sheets of paper. Simply choose the poster option and select the scale and orientation (see screenshot below). The "no white edge" requirement in your question cannot be met by software alone. As pointed by ...


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OpenCV has a large number of tools for doing almost exactly the sort of thing that you are talking about - you can even use it from within python to read frames into a numpy array, (as here), use numpy to operate on it and the write it out to a new video.


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You can use Photoshop CC 2015 or higher: non-gratis Windows and OS X can open SVG file can be scripted


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Inkscape can read a file in SVG format and save it as pdf v1.4 or v1.3 and allows a lot of possible manipulations but does not explisetly support producucing PDF/X but it can also output as Postscript, (.ps), then if you really need pdf/X you can run it through Ghostscripts ps2pdf which supports specifying -dPDFX=1 to force PDF/X-3 restrictions and also ...


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Color Management is quite demanding, and requires a good amount of resources to implement (to properly implement). So, this is something which is not just thrown after an user as a goodie. That said, you might have some success with Ghostscript …if you know what you are doing.


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There is a PSD.rb which is the file parser for Photoshop written in Ruby. To get the list of components, you can write a script like: require 'psd' PSD.open('path/to/file.psd') do |psd| # Get information about all the available layer comps puts psd.layer_comps end To save same component, you can write: # Save a layer comp psd.tree.filter_by_comp("...


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Vector Magic is the best image to vector program in my humble opinion. Here is an example jpg that I have vectorized in the following image using Vector Magic: Here is a zoomed area of the resultant vector. Vector Magic give great flexibility to choose the number of colors and the degree of vectorization. In this example I chose 3 main colors, black, ...


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If you are intending to work with SVG files, you should use Inkscape (even on Windows). It is a vector editor built around the file format. Inkscape can't take .PSD file formats - for that you can either deal witht he subset supported by GIMP, as pointed out in other answers, or try oppening then in Krita (though I don't know how their support for PSD is - ...


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Unfortunately, Gimp is not suitable for working with 9x% of graphics professionals. It will not open many PSD files at all, and gets the colors and layers info wrong on some that it will open. The closest thing to a 'solution', of which I am aware, is to use a Virtual Box running Windows. Even an old XP-compatible (2006) version of Photoshop will open ...


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