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5

Check out ZingChart. They have the ability to create treemaps and maps along with your more common chart types like line, bar, pie... There's also a ZingChart-AngularJS directive that makes it fairly painless to create dynamic charts with AngularJS. Here are a couple demos of treemaps and maps created with the ZingChart-AngularJS directive: Map : http://...


2

Gnuplot should fit your needs. It's a portable command-line driven graphing utility for Linux, OS/2, MS Windows, OSX, VMS, and many other platforms. It's relatively easy to use and you will find many tutorials around the internet. Supports many outputs formats like pdf, png, gif, jpeg, LaTeX, metafont, emf, svg and HTML5. According to the demonstrations ...


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Whilst not too conventional, I'm going to point the answer to another question with similar criteria: trejder on Free WiFi Analyzer.


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@arielf used a standard example from R but he does not mention direct solution using plotly library. Moreover, R is also powerful for importing datasets (e.g. read.csv which you can apply also to locale csv). https://plotly.com/r/heatmaps/ Intuitivity of use: R is not the easiest language Ease of input ingestion: R community is huge Speed: R is fast ...


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Here's an easier way. There's a free and open source utility xyz to quickly and conveniently visualize 3-dimensional numeric-data from any CSV file. It does auto-interpolation on the X, Y dimensions so it works even on partial (non full-grid) data. It allows you to extract any column by name or index from larger data-sets, and has many other options and ...


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One possibility is to use python macro scripting within LibreOffice: LibreOffice 5 comes with a python 3.3.5 installation within it python has a number of graphing components available which it seems can be installed Python and most of the libraries are Free, gratis & open source and cross platform.


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You could define a new command LaTeX: Example from https://arxiv.org/abs/1603.01547 : \newcommand{\attvis}[2]{\definecolor{att}{rgb}{1, #2, #2} \colorbox{att}{#1}} [...] \begin{figure}[t] \small \centering% \begin{tabular}{| p{\dimexpr0.47\textwidth-2\tabcolsep-\arrayrulewidth\relax}| } \hline \hspace{0.25\textwidth}\textbf{...} \\ %according to a ...


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One that I found that to my understanding uses Angular JS and has a somewhat similar layout as your image is called, "Cal Heatmap AngularJS Directive" which uses this JS library, "cal-heatmap". Both are open-source and available on GitHub. The layout is kind of different to the image above but has the same concept. It doesn't have the histogram on the top/...


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