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Yes, LibTomCrypt. LibTomCrypt implements most common cryptographic primitives (and many uncommon ones), including RSA (PKCS#1 v1.5, PSS and OAEP modes). The code is clean and portable C, so you can link it into applications written in pretty much any programming language. The library is made of small objects so that only the code you actually need will get ...


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You could download the source of the OpenSSL libcrypto from here and just use - with appropriate attributions - the parts that you need in your boot ROM. Supported algorithms, (According to Wikipedea): Ciphers AES, Blowfish, Camellia, SEED, CAST-128, DES, IDEA, RC2, RC4, RC5, Triple DES, GOST 28147-89 Cryptographic hash functions MD5, MD4, MD2, SHA-1, ...


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You should look at BusMaster: https://rbei-etas.github.io/busmaster It does not cover all CAN adapters but the most popular ones are there. I was able to work with CG150(Sauer Danfos), IXXAT, PCAN on it.


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I came back to share my experience with it during the recent months. I found the GUI programs calling two libraries: Zinc & WindML. The former is higher level calling the latter. I got a trial version of OS Changer from MapuSoft and found that they don't support porting of Zinc/VxWorks to Zinc/Windows. Instead, I found there is another version of Zinc, ...


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Your target platform (the device you want to run code on) will determine your toolchain and IDE as much as anything else. If you're running very small form-factor PCs (such as the Intel NUC), you can just use the development tools you are used to. If you go with something like the Arduino boards (popular embedded hobbyist boards) you'd be well served to ...


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If delivering server software to be installed on conventional sever computer hardware, being isolated seems like a non-issue to me. Edit your Question to elaborate if I have missed some important aspect. Vaadin Vaadin is a framework for building the user interface for business-oriented web apps. Vaadin Framework is implemented on top of the fast and ...


1

The solution I ended up with was not HTML as in the original question, but nevertheless some notes on my solution for anyone else who comes across this: For JavaScript I ended up porting and testing mJS (JavaScript engine), then used MongooseOS which uses mJS and which I was more-or-less happy with. I decided to just use JavaScript and basically forget my ...


1

The solution I found which is not perfect but worth trying and being investigated is to use CanBike OS in Kiosk mode. You can have a web explorer (which I don't need), and when you plug in a USB stick then you can open it and check files. It's the only thing you can do ! The cons are that you can't customize anything, and you have the puppy icon on the menu ...


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Text colouring and cursor placement can be obtained from coloroma using simple ANSI escape sequences but if you need keyboard event detection and more sophisticated screen handling your best bet is PyGame


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I agree with everything that @Michael said (and upvoted his answer). Your IDE will, by and large, be determined by your choice of processor. Atmel are great, have been around for decades, are reasonably priced and have lots of good peripherals, plus support forums. However, the "new kid on the block", the Raspberry Pi is now five years old and comes in ...


1

khash It is a header only hash table implemented with macros, memory efficient and fast. It holds up well even compared to modern c++ hash tables. khash uses double hashing as a probing strategy. I found out about it when trying to develop a c++ hash table to improve memory efficiency and in my tests it is only slightly slower than the best c++ hash tables ...


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Update: now as a proper Github repository: https://github.com/vi/macro_robinhood_hash Here is my Robin Hood open addressing hash table in C implemented entirely in macros: https://gist.github.com/vi/42c4d7bc854653a17e9085c8831c6dcd It is fixed size and memory-allocation-free and you can choose your own storage scheme. You give it primitives: setting/geting/...


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A two part answer: Many corporate networks do not allow any un-managed devices to connect to them and also lock the users from changing the network adaptors settings so recommend that configuration be carried out using a plug in USB network adaptor. Write a little script in python to prompt the user for the settings that are required and to send them down ...


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I've ended up with KVM because the specs changed and I'm no longer running the Hypervisor bare metal, so CentOS 7 became the target OS, and KVM was the easiest thing to use in my environment.


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As mentioned, emulation refers to implementing an HDL design on a set of FPGAs. If you want to truly simulate and verify at the transistor level, you'll need more than just a simulator as there is timing issues involved. You'll also need to place and route the transistors, and take the delay data from the layout and annotate it back into the original ...


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Are you really developing an ASIC? If so, you should have access to industrial strength simulators such as VCS and Model Sim. If you aren't, use the simulator that comes with your FPGA vendor's tools. Xilinx, Altera, and I think Lattice have them. They have free licenses for their small to medium devices. Also "emulator" often refers to "a bunch of FPGAs ...


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I just found a software from MapuSoft: http://www.mapusoft.com/ Their products are mainly for helping porting applications among different platforms to secure your investment on SW development. I even had a meeting with its FAE and saw his simple presentation & demo. I got trial version. It's very likely this could be what I want. Using this tool, I don'...


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Well, the king of protocol tracers is WireShark. You should google for WIreShark plus CANbus. Read things like this. And definitely look into this I know that you specify Windows, but you could have a fun project with the Raspberry Pi. I presume that you know that while CANbus has a common core, every manufacturer has their own specific information ...


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I'll tentatively suggest mbed TLS, formerly known as PolarSSL. Tentatively because I've never actually used it in an embedded project. It's maintained by ARM, and was designed to fit well on low-end platforms. The source code is fairly clean, portable C. You can easily pick the sources files you're interested in and omit the rest. RSA and ECDSA are ...


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Easy-ecc worked for me and it beats everything else by two orders of magnitude in terms of simplicity. https://github.com/esxgx/easy-ecc My second choice would be libtomcrypt (+ libtommath), although last time I've tried it I wasn't able quickly cut it to less than 100 kB binary on 32-bit DSP, so it may be not viable for bootloader.


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