26

I recommend Mozilla Thunderbird + Markdown Here add-on. Mozilla Thunderbird is an open-source, cross platform e-mail client that is extendable with add-ons (plugins). When you install the Markdown Here add-on, you will get a new toolbar button labeled "MD Toggle" on your message composition window. (Note: after you install, you may have to right-click ...


19

Personally I like Mozilla Thunderbird. It has a good track record of long term development (and is Open source) You have a GUI so email messages/thread display is possible. It doesn't have built in calendaring support but has a fairly mature extension - lightning It stores email messages in the mbox format - which is well documented and easily accessibly ...


12

If you're looking for an email client that can handle a high volume of emails, then I would say Microsoft Outlook Microsoft Outlook (Desktop not the web app) Features: Not a fork of Mozilla Thunderbird IMAP compatible Extremely Fast (The overall size of .pst and .ost files has a preconfigured limit of 50 GB. <- This can be increased too) Always in ...


12

Airmail.app supports Markdown editing with side-by-side preview. Markdown can be activated per-account as the default, or per-email through a single click in the composer. As far as I know, it's a relatively vanilla Markdown -- no support for things like formulas or footnotes that would come from a Markdown variant, however since I use it pretty much ...


11

How about the good old Mozilla Thunderbird? It's open-source, cross-platform and a lot of support is available online. It covers all the features you need (except the optional one). Plus it has got full POP3/IMAP support and works well with all kinds of accounts. Here are some of the features I like: Tabbed E-mail Add-ons Feature Requests High ...


10

When looking for "complete packages", iRedMail and Kolab are the obvious "master candidates". I've investigated both of them for my own use, but like you found Kolab a bit "overkill" (especially as I wanted to run the stuff on a Banana Pi, and there's no official repo for ARM packages). Both are pretty similar from their elements, and should match all of ...


7

I suggest you have a look at mutt. It's a text-based mail reader by design, which when coupled with a text editor, a sorting mail delivery agent and in past versions a mail transfer agent (for both sending and receiving mail) forms a highly versatile mail client. Must have: I want to keep every list in its own folder (or whichever concept the new client ...


7

I use Claws Mail for both my regular E-Mail and my Mailinglists as well. As you can see in the following image it allows horizontal scrolling: This image also shows the embedded body viewer on the bottom right. If you (like me) prefer to have your messages open in a separate window: Thats not a problem and works out of the box by double clicking them. It ...


6

Thunderbird has thousands of themes, of which some are dark, and you can easily tweak the background and text colours yourself.


6

My favourite email client is MailMate. It follows a keyboard-centric approach and provides native Markdown support with live preview. Give it a try!


6

I'll recommend Gmail (though actually I usually use Thunderbird and it would be my first rec but if you want a non desktop client or just to have another answer/option I'll add a GMail recommendation anyways). You can create custom autoresponders. AFAIK Gmail does NOT have any graph generation options With Chrome (and I think Firefox as well now) you can ...


5

Mutt is a very good terminal-based email client, which you can setup to use Vim as the default editor. It's got an address book and the features you want. I've used it for Gmail, and now Fastmail with various aliases. Link: http://www.mutt.org/ It should be in the repos for most distros. You can see and save any attachment that will display in a terminal (...


4

I can recommend Thunderbird. It’s a cross-platform (GNU/Linux, Mac OS X, Microsoft Windows), Free/Libre Open Source, gratis available email client from Mozilla. Multiple accounts Managing multiple accounts is easy and works great. Each account has its own settings, and each account can have several identities/aliases (each with its own email address, ...


4

K-9 mail is what I would personally suggest. I've not used it myself, but it's very popular among the open-source community because it's one of the few options on Android that properly supports plain-text email composition. In essence, it's a graphical version of the old text-based mutt email client specifically made for Android. Of your various points: ...


3

This worked me a few weeks ago: I ran Teamviewer on my pc back home and logged into it to check the mail using my home PC to grab it. This has the added advantage that you don't have to change your email address. EDIT I think the security is fine. As the two pcs have to exchange keys. And you have a password to log into your account (there is a free ...


3

The Great Chinese Firewall blocks only connections which it can interpret. If you have an encrypted VPN tunnel, it can't interpret that and thus it doesn't block. In your case I would let my home PC open, and used some home VPN solution to connect it from anywhere (also from my laptop in China).


3

I just like Thunderbird. I have not used it on mac so there may be slight differences from Windows. My full install (excluding user data) is ~52MB so while that pushes your envelope slightly that should still match fine. Thunderbird fully supports many accounts (I generally run with about a dozen accounts). Ram usage is pretty good (at least on Windows). ...


3

No. As of now, there doesn't seem to be any app that can selectively synchronize different labels for your Gmail account. Actually, if I need to have something to be always available offline, I would just clip it to my note-taking application on my phone (such as Evernote or Google Keep), which will also be syncing the data to the cloud so that the data is ...


3

For a desktop solution, I use Gnome Evolution for several years now (cannot remember when I started, but it was named Ximian Evolution back then, was bought by Novell, and now is a Gnome project – so it must be a looong time). For people who never heard of it before, it can be rawly compared to MS Outlook. First a reflection on the requirements asked for: ...


3

Without an IMAP or POP3 it is not possible to import a remote mailbox automatically using a generic program. However It may be possible to write one that recursively goes through the entire webmail interface to fetch all mails. But I don't recommend this way though, as in your case your provider gives you the ability to download your mails as files (As far ...


3

This isn't a mail client, but it's a nice solution that will enable Markdown in any Cocoa environment capable of displaying rich text (in addition to tons of other features to assist those who use Markdown often), so it will enable the convenient use of Markdown in Mac Mail, should you prefer to stick with the Apple mail client. See this post for information ...


3

Nylas N1 is the extensible, open source mail app. It has a Dark Mode built in, a "Two Panel" layout and is extensible. It runs on Windows, OS X, Linux (.deb and .rpm) available. The messages are shown tall in the middle panel - not just one line - when you shrink that section. There is an open feature request to only show the folders of the current ...


3

I have been using Mozilla's Thunderbird email client for years. It works quite happily on Windows 10, running different accounts connecting to various servers, POP3 and IMAP. The range of features is as good as any email client. Including your requirement for multiple signatures.


3

Portable Apps has a portable version of Thunderbird that should do the job nicely. Gratis - Yes Windows (10) - Yes & 7/8 Support Multiple email addresses/accounts - Yes Plays well with GMail and others - Yes Large User Base Yes both portable apps and Thunderbird have large user base and active communities GPG Yes "You can also add in GPG and Enigmail to ...


3

I think that the well-known Thunderbird is a good solution for these requirements. Thunderbird is Free Open-Source Software and available for Windows, OS X, Linux, BSD etc. One-click or shortcut key "Archive" action that places the email in an Archive folder, unless if sent to my personal domain, in which case it should place it in a folder based on the ...


3

Syncing in both directions is one of the key features of the IMAP protocol for arbitrary folders. For example in Thunderbird you can additionally define the synchronization options per account and folder, if they should be always downloaded etc. This allows to have the emails in sync everywhere and optionally still on the devices themselves.


3

Thunderbird, which is available for Windows, OS X and Linux, is free software and you can set the default font settings in the settings like here: You can also disallow messages to use other fonts, so your setting wins always:


2

MailMate fan here as well. For all those geeks obsessed with Markdown and keyboard navigation Comes with some really cool search features. A very detailed review including exclusive features MailMate has available.


2

Easy - learn some python - the included libraries give you SMTP, POP3 & IMAP4 plus decoders for a lot of formats - throw in wxPython for any GUI needed and you are away. All of it can be developed with and called from VIM. Some examples of sending mail with python, here .


2

If it wasn't for cost I would recommend Outlook 2010/2013 as they have the conversational view built-in, with ClearContext for filing. This would of course support PGP and you would still be able to use your PST files. To achieve this free, I can only see you achieving it by switching clients. The Client: Mozilla Thunderbird - Thunderbird is a free email ...


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