4

I work at Broadleaf Commerce. The community version is Apache 2 open source and runs on the Java/Spring stack. If you want to narrow your choices by stack, the following is a good start: Java - Broadleaf Commerce PHP - Magento Ruby - Spree If your needs are typical, you might want to consider a hosted solution like Shopify or BigCommerce.


3

You can use PrestaShop: free and open source mostly written in PHP support for bank card payment and payment from paypal tons of other e-commerce features


3

It seems that you don’t need a shopping module at all. You could build such a site by using general Drupal modules only, without having to code a single line yourself. Create a vocabulary "Categories". Create a content type "Product". Use the "Title" field for the product name, and the "Body" field for the product description. Add a term field "Category",...


2

This is, of course, possible with Drupal. Drupal Commerce and Ubercart are the two best known shopping modules for Drupal 7 (and both already offer development versions for Drupal 8). Both support various credit card payment gateways, and both also support the Payment module (a payment API so that not all shopping modules have to implement all the different ...


2

osCommerce is an e-commerce website I have built a website with. sales cart lists of products, categories plugins for tons of credit cards updates easy to maintain your product catalog thanks to the admin interface very popular software, so many developers know it, lot of documentation.


2

I once set up something similar, but it required some manual work, so this is more a concept instead of a fully-fledged solution: Set up a server, e.g. a LAMP stack Set up your domain as you would normally (e.g. in /var/www/example.com) Create your shop in a directory that's hard to find by accident (e.g. /var/www/example.com/ap2omouin25adih1ahdihuhy12) For ...


2

Have you checked out Tryton? It is a whole ERP, but, because it is modular, you can use just what you want. AFAIK, it has a REST API if you want to access it just like a service. It has GPL-3 license.


2

Good choice - both are pretty solid. The reason why I'd cast my vote for Woo is the payment gateways. At the end of the day that is the only thing that matters. You go out of your way to get the traffic in, finally people make up their minds to pay, and then... they bounce because... it no longer matters why - the payment gateway failed, and there goes a ...


2

If the merchant supports it PayPal gives exactly what you are looking for with the advantage that the payment method is not shared with anybody - much safer. You shop for something Click on Pay with PayPal PayPal gets a notification that the merchant is asking you for the sum You input to PayPal your password PayPal tells the merchant that you have paid, ...


2

When I last used Windows on an old Laptop, I used TurboLister for this. Was really convenient (miss something like that on Linux now): TurboLister (click images for larger variants) Let's see how it meets your requirements: free: yes. Windows 7/8 compatible: its homepage states at least Windows 7 compatibility. upload images: yes. save products locally ...


2

I'm the founder of Ticket Tailor and came across your question. We usually work out much cheaper than Eventbrite due to the fact that we don't take a cut on the ticket sale and we allow you to use stripe for payment processing who have low payment processing fees. You can see details of our pricing here: https://www.tickettailor.com/pricing Whilst Ticket ...


1

Based on the limited details you've already given, I feel confident saying that you do not want to make your own payment processor. (Or even host your instance of one.) Furthermore, unless you've determined that it's worth it to your organization to internalize the security costs and risks, you should avoid any solution in which anyone's credit card ...


1

From what you have suggested I would maybe look at the following: Stripe - This has an easy sign-up process and hosted payment options to reduce the PCI compliance issues and ideal for low volume. It's also very popular so there are a number of integrations avilable for it. Braintree Payments - A little like stripe, maybe aimed at higher volume, but not as ...


1

We created many Nopcommerce websites for big and complex ecommerce needs


1

Have a look at Easy Digital Downloads. I nearly used it for a client (their spec changed halfway through) but it looks like it could work for you. It's aimed at digital subscriptions


1

Sharetribe (source code) The most well-known open source solution for marketplaces. Built on Ruby, has a strong community. Perfectly adapted for MVPs and proof-of-concept projects. Can handle sales and services/rentals. Their own description: Sharetribe is an open source platform to create your own peer-to-peer marketplace. Cocorico (source code) ...


1

The setup for this can be fairly complex, but a good place to start is to use a "multiple package" plugin... such as Packages Configuration for Woocoomerce or Multiple Packages for WooCommerce, which allow you to split the packages up for each vendor. This way, customers can choose a shipping method for each package on the Cart page. Allowing the vendors to ...


1

I would like to recommend WooCommerce for WordPress. It should be exactly what you are looking for. WooCommerce with Wordpress is, Free of charge eCommerce admin dashboard to manage products, clients and orders. - Has an awesome backend where you do just that and more WooComcerce integrates with WordPress themes, so essentially you would have your app ...


1

If you won't have any sufficient SaaS wiki, try think about Drupal. Drupal is good equipped for user-accesses and for paying-for-something. There are some modules for making wiki with Drupal: try https://www.drupal.org/search/site/wiki But there are plenty other ways in Drupal, how to organize editing of the content by many people.


1

Odoo might be your answer. It is a full featured e-commerce system with many plugins. It is open source and Bitnami has installers for it.


1

IT sounds like a job for Drupal since it is very flexible. Look into Drupal 7 + Commerce at the moment, D8 is too young I guess. https://www.drupal.org/project/commerce_marketplace There are some caveats though and Ubercart is a bit longer in the game but it's less flexible than Commerce: https://www.drupal.org/project/ubercart_marketplace For the ...


1

basically an online shop without the need of a shopping basket or payment system You could choose a CMS at http://www.cmsmatrix.org/ to meet your exact needs. But,if all that you want is truly only "an online shop without the need of a shopping basket or payment system" then, IMO, you can't beat Drupal, which is extremely popular, extremely powerful, ...


1

So you need a fully API-ready e-commerce backend. I would suggest that you take a look to Sylius, it's built as a Symfony bundle and is the most developer-friendly e-commerce framework that I know. You can check out all the data available through its APIs here.


1

To me it sounds like you're looking for a e-commerce framework rather than a complete e-commerce system with a cms? -- even though you of course could highly customize any of the big e-commerce solution like Magento or Prestashop to look like you want. I suggest you check out Konakart. Maybe Apache Open for Business could be interesting too, but I haven't ...


1

I did research about webshops and found that Magento seems the best choice. Did you look at Magento ? It's PHP with rdbms backend. There are also other similar project, but AFAIK magento is the best, since it is the most mature and has the most complete set of functions and interoperability with other vendors, if you want to host your own webshop and can run ...


1

I suggest you have a look at https://www.openbazaar.org/ We are now 2.5 years later so things have evolved most probably in the right direction for you.


1

You can use PrestaShop: Self-hosted, opensource and free to use commercially Easy to use Variety of payment options, including Paypal Modular (but not all modules all free -> that's how PrestaShop makes money) mostly written in PHP support for bank card payment and payment from paypal tons of other e-commerce features Pretty active dev community


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PHP: OpenCart Prestashop Magento WooCommerce Ruby: Spree Ror_ecommerce Shoppe


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Here's a link to most commom of them: http://www.practicalecommerce.com/articles/73649-11-Open-Source-Ecommerce-Platforms OpenCart & PrestaShop are one of the easiest to set-up. Magento has the biggest community. And Well, these are called Content Management Systems (CMS).


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