Hot answers tagged

13

Meld (Wikipedia article) allows this. When you open a new diff tab (Ctrl+n), a popup asks you to select two (or three) files. You can simply hit OK here, without selecting something. It opens empty buffers, just like in a text editor, which allows you to paste (or type) text. The diff happens on the fly (while you paste/type/edit the text). When you close ...


11

vimdiff vimdiff file1 file2 You can also use it with git, for example: git difftool --tool=vimdiff HEAD^ HEAD


9

My open source online json diff tool should do the trick: http://json-diff.com


8

Technically, XMLs are different if they have whitespaces or not if the order is different if they have comments or not if they have processing instructions or not if their encoding is different if their namespaces are different but of course you can decide to ignore that or not, based on the semantic information an XML does not have. Microsoft has ...


7

I have been using Web Alert (Google Play) for quite some time and find it the most useful one. It's completely free but it is only available on android phones. Web Alert is simple, it has a ton of functionality and it does not seem to affect my battery life or waste my mobile data usage in any noticeable way (although I'm screening seven web pages at the ...


6

Focusing on the part that moved sections should be reported as no difference made me think of http://semanticmerge.com/, which doesn't compare XML-files, but C# and C code. And as it understand those languages it is able to display if code has moved and not changed. This leads to an alternative approach for this question: Could it be possible to translate ...


6

This answer won't be as good as I usually like (due to lack of knowledge on my part) but I think it should work well for you. What I would suggest is ImageMagick's Compare function. It is command line only but it outputs an 2 (error), 0 (similar) or 1 (disimilar) as well as image difference map - there are a few different types that it can output - see the ...


6

So you want an interactive diff tool with very basic features. The obvious answer is Emacs (Ubuntu: emacs), which includes Ediff since about 20 years ago. Open the two files that you want to compare, and select “Tools → Compare (Ediff) → Two Buffers…” in the menu. Or select “Tools → Compare (Ediff) → Two Files…” and enter the file names. You can use the ...


6

Git itself ships with gitk to browse the repository (which includes showing diffs of stuff you've already committed) , gitgui and git difftool [which allows you to choose one of the merge tools present in your system]. What I personally use is Gitcola, which I find quite convenient: Gitcola (source: Gitcola; click image to enlarge) It not only handles the ...


5

A good option is to register at: Change Detection This will track changes for you. Give the service the URL of the web site(s) of interest and it will email you when it sees a change.


5

Download and install python, numpy, graphplotlib and audiolab you can then: Load audio files into numpy arrays using audiolab. Diff the arrays. Plot the result. Learn a lot... it's all free


5

Hex diff viewers with console/terminal graphics: vbindiff, (divides screen into top and bottom, no right/left view), hexdiff, (same look as vbindiff, but also a hex editor), dhex (top/bottom diff viewer, editor, but resizes to fit terminal, and offers better navigation.) Graphical hex diff viewers: I don't know of one, but here's a shell function to ...


4

I think Beyond Compare does meet your needs. The folder comparison feature shows which files are different between two sets of folders and you can then select all files and generate a file differences report, which I think is what you want. Using a simple example, the GUI looks like this: and the report looks like this: FILE COMPARISON Produced: 15/05/2014 ...


4

I recently found json-delta at https://pypi.python.org/pypi/json-delta/ You can install on your computer with command pip install json-delta To use it, just use the command json_diff -u file1.json file2.json


4

Another option is diffuse: http://diffuse.sourceforge.net/index.html It opens to two blank panes by default, and you can paste whatever you like into each side.


4

I think a good buzzword here would be "fuzzy diff". Possible answer: https://github.com/google/diff-match-patch online tool to evaluate: https://neil.fraser.name/software/diff_match_patch/demos/diff.html (activate efficiency cleanup) Technical explanations of the algorithm: https://neil.fraser.name/writing/diff/ Other possibilities and related questions: ...


3

Trackly is worth a look, it will email you an image of the webpage with changes highlighted. Hourly and daily checks available. It works well even with very dynamic web pages using tons of javascript and other fanciness. It's free while in beta.


3

Have a look at Puppy Linux: bootable from USB runs on RAM very low system requirements two main builds: one Slackware based and the other Ubuntu based has ntfs support it's not x64 includes other software (web browser, text editor, MP3 player) it can save user data and settings on a file on USB


3

When I looked into both answers above they were "right" and I marked them as such. In sorting it out a friend of mine told me about the Bash command for "unique." Turns out it is uniq used in conjunction with sort. Once I knew the name, a quick search pulled up this Stackoverflow answer.


3

You can use VLOOKUP() function in Excel (or in equivalent spreadsheet). It is the fastest way and requires no programming. The VLOOKUP is well-described across the internet. But if you get stuck somewhere, add the comment and I'll help you. Possible limitation is height limit of sheet - it can have up to 1,048,576 rows.


3

I'm a fan of the diff tool Meld for this kind of thing. It lets you compare up to 3 files at a time, as requested, but will also compare entire directories if needed. Just a few features from their home page: Two- and three-way comparison of files and directories File comparisons update as you type Auto-merge mode and actions on change blocks ...


3

When researching for an answer to this question, besides a variant over using SemanticMerge as my suggested answer for "Diff tool for XML Files", I found another tool which claims to be context aware for a few programming languages: Compare++, which brags about the following: Compared with other file comparison tools, the great process made in Compare++ ...


3

It turns out WinMerge is capable of it. The instructions are WinMerge command line options Being an existing user, I should have thought of it :). Only goes to show.


3

You might also like to take a look at kdiff3 - it allows you to compare 2 or 3 files or directories side by side and to optionally merge them to a specified output location which can be any of the input locations or another location. Free, Gratis & Open Source Cross Platform Supports multiple languages, Interface in az, bg, br, ca, cs, cy, da, de, el, ...


3

Not the prettiest necessarily, but you could could do it with process substitution and heredocs: diff <(cat <<EOF1 First text and more EOF1) <(cat <<EOF2 Second text and more EOF2) would produce the output: 1c1 < First text --- > Second text and you could put whatever you like in each block of text of course. Another option would ...


2

I would use python, (already installed on mac/linux/unix and available for windows), something like: from glob import glob actual_files = set(glob('/path/to/images/*.jpg')) # The actual files as a set with open('list/of/Images/Referenced') as f: # Assuming that you have the referenced files as one per line with just the image tags rf = [fp for fp in f....


2

Although in the end I have not applied diff patches manually (I managed to force software to apply old updates) pursue of this goal resulted in enough know-how on it to do it (which showed me how to "fix" said software updater). First step is identifying diff type. Text, binary, directory, incremental, decremental (reverse)... and then you need to find out ...


2

This is not really an answer but in case nothing better comes up, it could give an answer in the future :-) There is our own online application, VIRaL, that allows for much more major changes like major change of viewpoint (wide-baseline matching), resulting e.g. in major scale change or arbitrary orientation; major occlusion, or partial matching to the ...


2

I feel to suggest you DiffMerge. It runs (even) on Windows and, similarly to WinMerge and Devart Code Compare, has a nice GUI. Comparing it to WinMerge, I personally think DiffMerge is better at file diff while WinMerge wins hands down at folder diff. As for Devart Code Compare, DiffMerge offers several features for free (for example it offers 3-way text ...


2

You want WinMerge. It will print highlighted differences, has print preview & is free. [Update] I just tried Beyond Compare (v3, there is av4 available now) and it will even let you save the comparison as HTML. That should be enough(?). It's not free, but is worth the money for the extra features.


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