6

RegexBuddy for analyzing and tweaking regular expressions. This is one of my most important tools. RegexMagic for hand-held creation. There's also a big list of tools at the bottom of the Stack Overflow Regular Expressions FAQ. RegexBuddy (this is the part I use the most by far--analysis): RegexMagic: Regarding scripting, I know of the RegReplace ...


2

I am not sure about what you mean with «based on Ubuntu». A desktop environment either runs on Ubuntu or it doesn't. Also, «the best desktop environment» is clearly a matter of opinion, therefore I will focus only on your bullet points. Touch-friendly buttons Cursor disappears when using touch input but shows where it was pressed Ubuntu already ...


2

node.js can be used to create a stand-alone desktop application. It does not have to be used only to create a web server that would be used in concert with a browser. For example, you could write a node.js program to search through a comma delimited text file, find a bunch of data, then insert that data into a database, then output to the console how many ...


2

To change the environment variables the most usual tool is the default editor, (vi/emacs/whatever), applied to the .bashrc or other environment setting script that is run on login but you can, potentially also use tools such as sed or ex to make changes to such files. To apply the changes without logging out and back in simply use the source command, (...


2

I think you can give a try at the FVWM window manager, it's fully customizable by a single configuration file, and it's default theme is something that looks like the old Windows 95 UI. That can be a good start for what you want to use without too much work in the design.


2

To do so manually in the Registry: Locate the context menu item in HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\CLSID, e.g., fro Run as Administrator: You will likely need to take ownership to make any change to that key. Add a DWORD value, flags. Set the value to 0 to put it in the Rename section of the context menu. Set the value to 1 to put it in the Send to section of the ...


2

Until she passed away, I had my Mom running Kubuntu for 15 years. The trick is not to match the Windows interface exactly (which has its own issues anyway) but to have an interface that is close enough and pleasant enough to use that learning it is easy. The second most important thing is to pick a distribution and window manager that DOESN'T CHANGE THE UI ...


2

I imagine most distributions support this feature by default or with some tinkering using plugins. Cinnamon has this functionality natively. Just Right-Click panel -> Edit Panel and change the Layout to Top. After this change my Desktop looked like this: And with a maximized window opened:


2

I use Strawberry Perl for regex operations. It is a free and open source distribution of Perl that works on Windows, and it has a portable version. Perl regex is strong and easy to pick up, and it matches your criteria: Uses ^ and $ to indicate the beginning and the end of a line, respectively Uses the \n token for newline on Windows It is case sensitive by ...


1

It sounds pretty much like you may want Gnome3 as your desktop environment. It's quite similar to Unity, but a lot more customisable. It gives an integrated top bar like Unity, with the menu options. There's also plenty of addons available at https://extensions.gnome.org/ to customise it too. There's an extension to 'force' undecorated windows too, which ...


1

The combination of Python/Jupyter/Pandas and graphing suites such as HoloViz should give you what you need with minimal coding and good interactivity. You can get the full installation in a few simple steps: Install Anaconda or Miniconda if you don't have it already Open the conda prompt and conda create -n holoviz python=3.7 conda activate holoviz conda ...


1

DesktopOK can store the layout of desktop icons It allows you to store them in files or in an internal list. I don't think it also stores background images. Unfortunately it does not seem to store the shortcuts themselves.


1

MenuTools can be a choice for you. It admit severan options. Here is the link. Also FileMenu Tools can be usefull:


1

slf4j I use java standard logging lib slf4j 'org.slf4j:slf4j-api:1.7.7@jar' the logging api included in all code 'eu.lp0.slf4j:slf4j-android:1.7.7-1@jar' include in the android app: android specific implementation of slf4j 'org.slf4j:slf4j-simple:1.7.7' include in non-android app: j2se implementation of slf4j your android app also needs a file "...\app\src\...


1

One possibility is the use of the windows shortcut keys and docking if you: Open your editor as described then hold the windows key and press the cursor right button, this will dock your editor on the right using half the screen, alt-tab will switch you back to the previous app, then windows+left will doc that to the left. (Directions can be reversed of ...


1

Conky is a nearly-infinitely configurable system monitor that could be set to display weather. It should be in Ubuntu's default repositories (maybe universe or multiverse). There's even some built-in weather display options, here's a section from man conky: weather URI locID data_type (interval_in_minutes) Download, parse and display METAR data. ...


1

You could create desktop toolbars on Windows XP. Here is how: Right click on the taskbar, choose toolbars then New Toolbar... Navigate to the desired folder and hit OK Unlock the taskbar, and drag the folder toolbar onto the desktop The result should look like this: You could resize the toolbar or drag it to the edges of the screen and it will snap to a ...


1

Sounds pretty similar to the specification of KDE. It has multiple desktops, but you don't need to use them - you can just remove the 'applet' from the main bar. KDE is more of a traditional desktop than say GNOME or Unity. It does have a hierarchical application structure on their 'Start' menu equivalent, but this can be modified rather easily if it's ...


1

If you care about keeping the "feel" (compatibility) with the original grep "per-se" (short of running Cygwin), I'd recommend GNU Grep. Of course, this means: no GUI you'd need to use the equivalents of other Linux commands, piping them as you need (you can grab them here); for example, grep will search but won't be enough to do the replace as well.


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