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Have you considered Lynx? It's text only, but very usable. It's available for most platforms. It's open-source. Visit their site here: https://lynx.invisible-island.net/release/ If you're using a Mac, start a Terminal and execute "brew install lynx". For Windows, visit the Lynx installer page


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[Promoting my comment to an answer...] WANEM - The Wide Area Network emulator Controlling Windows bandwidth within Windows is tricky; however, if you build a virtual machine with the Windows webserver in it, then you can do much more with wanem. In your specific situation, you need: Windows VM with one virtual NIC Linux VM with two virtual NICs, (which ...


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Install python then using urllib.urlretrieve you can do some thing like: import urllib import datetime urls = ['ftp://someserver/path/to/file', ....] times = [] for url in urls: started = datetime.datetime.now() urllib.urlretrieve(url, '/tmp/saved.bin') # You may wish to add a callback to time out slow connections ended = datetime.datetime.now() ...


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I used Fiddler to simulate slow network speeds. At that time, I was using a Windows 7 box. However, at the bottom of the page, they since claim to support a variety of OSs (this covers the "other environments" suggestion). By default, you have a preset to simulate "modem speeds". However, since Fiddler gives you access "under the hood", you can alter the ...


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What I ended up doing was creating tasks to run on user logon, and then again every 15 minutes, these tasks can be created with the schtasks command: schtasks /create /sc ONLOGON /tn wifi1 /tr <.bat for 15 minute task (next two lines)> schtasks /delete /tn wifi2 /f schtasks /create /sc MINUTE /mo 15 /tn wifi2 /tr <.bat to spit out wifi stats logs>...


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I use Speedtest by Ookla (http://www.speedtest.net) on my iPhone and iMac. Works great. Measures upload and download speeds. Their web page says its available for android too. To my knowledge it never does anything until you start it. It logs your result but only locally. If wrong on that please let me know.


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I cannot check it out myself (I'm not a MacOS user), bit iGetter seems to be what you're after: iGetter is a powerful, full featured download manager and accelerator. iGetter can greatly improve the speed of your downloads using segmented downloading. In addition it allows auto resume on broken downloads, queue filtering by various criteria, site explorer,...


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Python has tools to perform just about any data transfers that you can imagine in the various URL libraries and the timeit tool is very handy for timing operations. You can then select from a wide range of data visualization tools to display the data, trends, etc. I would suggest taking looks at matplotlib and at plot.ly for that.


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