Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
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I think that possibly Review Board would fit your needs: It doesn't change the code You and your team can review: A change or diff An existing block of code An image, screenshot or part of the overall program A pdf, e.g. part of the documentations Power Pack Option Works with a variety of version control systems and hosts Various pricing options: Review ...


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I had a pretty good experience with Reviewboard https://www.reviewboard.org free, MIT license entirely web-based (used it locally hosted) primarily oriented towards reviewing code diffs with general and inlined comments and replies support it can be used to review non-diffs items as well (as regular file attachments) logging in is required, the submitter ...


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I have never used any code review tool other than Gerrit and GitLab (see below), but here are some that I know about (all of these are for Git, because that is what I know, but some may work with other Revision Control Systems): Phabricator has lots of features for Software Engineering, and code review is one of them. It also looks like it has a much nicer ...


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I've always used TortoiseHg for my mercurial GUI needs on Windows, which has very nice pre-commit / merge support. You can always right-click on the Working Directory in the changeset view and select Diff to Parent to open your selected diff tool with all the changes in your current repository before you commit. You can also select any changeset and Diff to ...


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I would strongly recommend Review Board having used it myself and knowing several other projects that have used it successfully. Features: Multiple reviewers Flexible but formal workflow Extensible via REST and Python APIs Free download or hosting available, free community support or paid for support contracts. Supports multiple VCS systems, (Mercurial, ...


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I've found SwiftLint and Tailor, which both enforce Swift style and convention best practices. Both can be run from the command line as an external tool, or integrated with Xcode. Both are well-maintained and Tailor is cross-platform. Both have customizable rules engines. Tailor looks more "official," with a more stable dev team, but it's hard to say ...


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I've used and assisted in deployment of SmartBear Collaborator, the built-in GitLab Merge requests, and Review Board both with and without integration into GitLab. I've also personally investigated Atlassian Crucible. The solution you choose is largely based on your workflow, each of the options has it's own benefits and detriments. There are a few ...


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It sounds like you are looking for ReviewBoard. Interfaces with multiple version control systems Syntax highlighted code, (in 300 languages), in diffs Smart handling of indentation changes Documentation review as well as code Moved code detection Issue Tracking Lots of notification options Lots of reporting options


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I think you are looking for SourceMonitor. A freeware tool that can calculate cyclomatic complexity for a number of languages, including C++, C, C#, VB.NET, Java, and Delphi.


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For JavaScript there is JSLint which is itself written in JavaScript. The answer to this SO answer details a couple of possibilities for perl. In either case you can wrap the call in a process that returns 0 if all the rules are met and -1 otherwise then call it in a pre-commit hook. See the redbook entry on hooks for more information and the config ...


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You could take a look at: SwiftLint - Gratis & Open Source Atom Linter + SwiftC plugin - Also Gratis & Open Source but requires Atom so may not suit your usage.


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FishEye appears to be basically hg serve on steroids. Crucible is basically a private-cloud Bitbucket Crucible has some minimal integration with FishEye, so you can click on files and changesets to view them in FishEye, and a couple of other insignificant bits of integration. Definitely, they can be used independently. Source


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Use Programino - it supports Code Auto-Complete and has more awesome features. https://programino.com/ide-for-arduino.html If you're not ready to pay, you can use Microsoft VS Code too. It has a responsive UI and also supports code- autocomplete & Arduino flashing. https://code.visualstudio.com/ Update#1: I think the VS Code has the most relevance in ...


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The file is likely machine code. The "nonsense characters" you're seeing are bytes of code being misinterpreted as bytes of text in some 8-bit encoding, perhaps Windows-1252. If you identify the instruction-set architecture of the devices on which the file runs, you can probably disassemble it. However, disassembly produces assembly language, not the ...


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Have you considered requesting that the client supply the data in a non proprietary exchange format such as STEP, which is the exchange format for electronics CAD information, or DXF, then using either any software you may already have or: FreeCAD - Better for the mechanical side KiCad - For schematics Personally I always consider it a valid step in a ...


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Devart ReviewAssistant is a convenient tool for iterative reviews in TFS. It integrates with Visual Studio and supports TFVC as well as other source control systems.


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I had a pretty good experience with Reviewboard https://www.reviewboard.org, I recommended it before: Peer review software for programming assignments Specifically for your requirements: works great for geographically dispersed teams review actions are very granular (comments/answers/issues/edits/etc) and can be executed independently or can be batched and ...


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You may want to check out what the course management systems do for peer review on submissions (papers, etc) - no reason to not use it for code. Moodle is all Open and has a peer review assignment type - https://docs.moodle.org/19/en/Peer_Review_Assignment_Type My personal favorite is Canvas, and you can get a free course to teach in on their servers, or ...


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Try Oxcoder https://www.oxcoder.net A coding evaluation platform for tech recruitment but meets your requirements. Open source, Solution needed, Automatic analyzing and scoring.


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A new option, under development, would be to use iPythons nbgrader for your assignments - this can give the students assignments in rich text format to fill in and can then use a mix of auto-grading and manual. While the examples have simple tests of python code is should be possible to develop tests which compile then test the code, also to run tools like ...


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You can try Source Code Library. It's a code editor and document manager with version control. Features include: Version history Office 2007-like interface Runs on Windows Search and filter functions, with regex support Tools for import and export between the library and hard drive Other features The software has a 30 day trial period, and the full version ...


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Collaborator has support for Mercurial and many other version control systems. I'm guessing for you cost might be an issue.


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Having found http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_tools_for_code_review I see there aren't many options! It's Phabricator, Review Board or Crucible. We do use other Atlassian products so it may be feasible to use Crucible, but it looks too expensive considering we're currently using a free tool. It looks like the best idea will be to set up a test ...


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Deveo supports pre-merge code reviews for both Git and Mercurial. Subversion support is coming later on. The following blog posts describes the workflow for Git, and Mercurial respectively. There's a video attached of the workflow in the Mercurial post. (Disclaimer: I work at Deveo)


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