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8

OrCad Capture I have used OrCad a fair bit. I use it for university, it is part of many of my units. The demo is free and is fully featured but "Limitations are in the size and complexity of the design." I have not had any trouble with hitting these limits when I have been using the free version. It has a large collection of libraries. NTC resistor can be ...


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There is FreeCAD Free and opensource Multiplatform 3D CAD GUI and command line Compatible with files created by other CAD software FreeCAD is a parametric 3D modeler. Parametric modeling allows you to easily modify your design by going back into your model history and changing its parameters. FreeCAD is open source (LGPL license) and completely modular, ...


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LTspice is another alternative, similar to the other answers here. It has a small, steep learning curve, but after a few hours you should have no problem to simulate simple circuits. You can do DC, AC, transient analysis etc.. and offers a library with a good variety of basic components. Below are two screenshots from my installation on OSX, but it shouldn'...


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While my answer does not meet the requirement of C#/java, I thought I would mention it as it is in intensive development, and is open-source. FreeCad It is written in Python and in some C++. It has an extremely active core group of contributors that do an excellent job of documentation. They will be quick to tell you that 2D-layout is not their direct goal,...


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You're not likely to find any complete CAD software being opensource, simply because they are really complex programs. However, one of the the options you have are: Draftsight Can handle large files and is free Is very usable, having an AutoCAD-esque interface Is cross platform and compatible with Windows 8 and 8.1 But not open-source My father is a ...


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What you are asking is to do compositing. Blender can do compositing; compositing Blender is also free and opensource.


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There is a program called plate and sheet professional that appears to cover a good portion of your requirements. The site description notes that the results can be output in DXF for universal compatibility. The screen shots appear to provide the sample image you reference. Fairly expensive, but not compared to something like an AutoCAD license. Over the ...


3

It has been a few years since this question was posted and I wanted to add another more recent option. Onshape is a 3D solid modeling application that runs in the browser and thus is cross platform. It works amazingly well. It is not open source, but has a free option for non-commercial applications. There are excellent learning resources provided including ...


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AutoCad P&ID A free application for educational use. It achieves all you are after: Integration into Revit and automatic tagging and listing (Share databases, xrefs, and more) Faster P&ID drafting (Simple, in-context AutoCAD commands) Standard symbol libraries (PIP, ISA, JIS, and ISO/DIN are included) Data Validation tool (Quickly look for possible ...


2

You can use Proteus from Labcenter. It is commercial software but with evaluation version you can create full schematic and simulate it but you can't save it. The limitations are that it does not allow you to save, print or design your own microcontroller based designs (you can however write your own software programs to run on the existing sample design ...


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You could try Blender which with python scripting can allow you to parameterise portions of the design, animate and with the physics engine test your designs to an extent. Free & Open Source Full 3D modelling Cross Platform including Linux Import & Export various CAD formats Scriptable in python


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Your question is a bit confusing because it seems like you wish to have features you find in a CAD application included in a Sketching software. So here I will recommend not a single application but a combination: LibreCAD / Sketchup / AutoCAD Now from what I have worked with, you can do what you wish in your "Scaled drawing approach" with AutoCAD or any ...


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I have friends involved in the aerospace industry as part of an internship via Embry Riddle Aeronautical University. Almost exclusively, the curriculum involves using Catia for design and engineering. The internship is with a big company in the western USA and it uses that software for everything involved in design. It's not an inexpensive program, but ...


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There is a plugin in Blender that is pre-installed and just have to be enable. A tutorial can be found here.


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It's unfortunate that you found OpenSCAD difficult, as it would be a strong contender in your project. For SolveSpace, one uses the Dimension option (D) and double click on the resulting figure in the display. Fusion 360 is free to hobbyists and only has to be re-registered once per year. Of these three, you have a strong chance of getting things to work, ...


1

I'd suggest DraftSight for this, as it's open-source, free and very well supported and documented, and has an install base in the millions. https://www.3ds.com/products-services/draftsight-cad-software/ Caveat: I'm no coder, I'm a tech writer/illustrator, draughter, graphic designer, 3D modeler and architectural designer, so I approach this from the ...


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There's a pretty significant disconnect between BIM and GIS in terms of actual parametric data - there is a BIM interchange format which retains most common BIM parameters but allows transfer between various BIM platform, called IFC (Industry Foundation Classes - see link for details), but I don't know of any plug-ins allowing that format to be read or ...


1

I haven't used its python API extensively, but I believe FreeCAD can do most, if not all of the actions you listed from the python API, without running a GUI, based on this snippet from the FreeCADweb.org website: FreeCAD is built from scratch to be totally controlled by Python scripts. Almost all parts of FreeCAD, such as the interface, the scene ...


1

You could try QCAD, i dont know moch about it but there is library with e-parts available http://www.ribbonsoft.com/en/qcad-add-ons . You can create, modify it... Insertion is similar to drag and drop. If you dont need dwg support and ather features, maybe free communiti version would be enought for you. Proffesionla version for 33 Eur provide some extra ...


1

Babylon is much more about simulation and 3d rendering so Three.js would seem a better fit. Three.js is very mature, has been used in other CAD related developments and often used for browser-based diagramming tools. Check out a search of npm to find a number of CAD related modules for three.js. References for Three.js: OpenJSCAD - An open source web-...


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I use the Quite Universal Circuit Simulator. It is a cross platform circuit analysis software and one of the best. Open source.


1

I may be wrong, but I'd bet you can do this in OnShape. In fact, I'd be surprised if you can't do almost anything you can do in SolidWorks in OnShape. Worth a look I think: https://forum.onshape.com/discussion/1895/tutorial-how-to-create-raised-text-on-a-curved-surface Hope that helps - oh and seeing as you are familiar with SolidWorks, I should note that ...


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KiCad can do all that you require: Free, Gratis & Open Source Cross Platform - Windows, Linux and OS X Up to 32 Copper Layers Footprint Editor Push & Shove Routing 3D Viewer Active User & Developer Communities Gerber Export Allows python scripting Lots of other goodies


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I don't think something like that exists. You can use wav files as input (for sources) in LTspice and save the output in that format too, but I have not tried myself that function. It's apparently very slow. And if just want to do audio programming (no real electronic components), there are plenty of options: SuperCollider, Max/MSP etc. The latter (which ...


1

While missing one of your requirements I would still suggest investing the time to learn Blender 3D modelling tool, as in this tutorial. Vague appearance of your robot Yes or exact if you wish to put in the time Count the blocks Yes Easy to use a steep learning curve but lots of tutorials on the web and a really good investment of your time Free Yes both ...


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The two main options are OpenSCAD and FreeCAD. Both are parametrizables but in different way: OpenSCAD has a domain specific programming language while FreeCAD leverages an interactive approach. This video highlights these differences.


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Freecad is good, but lacks the refinement from software like Inventor or Solidworks (I use the last one). ProE had a linux version until few years ago, lately NX from Siemens is spreading in linux engineering, that is a full size package, closer to Catia than Inventor. That is what you are looking for. It is officially supported in redhat and suse (linux ...


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You can use FreeCAD. It is an open source CAD program. I don't think it can import Inventor files directly, but it can import STEP, IGES, and other open formats. It is available for download and it is in the package repositories for Ubuntu and Fedora (according to their site).


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You didn't say in what file-format you modelled your pieces or in which you need your CAD data. You could try blender, its free and supports many different formats for import- and exporting. Its more a 3d modelling software but it should serve your purpose. If it doesn't support your prevered format(s) you can activate even more importers/exporters under ...


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