6

Avast (free, Windows) can be configured so that it doesn't block or delete suspicious files: FYI: if one day some file ends up in the virus chest, since it's pretty tough to find (as Avast just put in the chest some Matlab file it gave me the opportunity to search for it...): How do I access the avast! Virus Chest?


5

AVG Anti-Virus, it can add a plugin to browsers to allow your search results to tell you if a site is safe or not and it picks up attacks and blocks them and it has your normal Anti-virus scanning and secluding but that's kinda standard. A nice feature about it that if your offline for a long time it will notify you that your definitions may be out of date ...


5

You can try Sophos. It is an antivirus that is solely focused on providing security to organisations and businesses. Not all features were listed on their website so I looked up some reviews. Here's the summary: Centralised management Easy to install and maintain (set-and-forget installation) On demand and scheduled virus scans - can also be initiated by ...


5

It depends on the features you want. If you just want software that scans on-demand, but nothing else, ClamXav is a great free app from the App Store, and its rating on the app store speaks for its efficiency and simplicity. Since it has no constantly-running processes to protect the computer, it takes up very little memory. However, if you want antivirus ...


4

Avast will do this, set up appropriately. On my dad's system I turned off the audio-prompts (which annoy the heck out of me) and set it for silent/gaming mode (which prevents it launching popups). This should disable any inappropriate user interaction


4

Microsoft Security Essentials (MSE) would be my recommendation for simple but effective tool for those who don't want to know what they're doing/have to do anything. Configuration is annoyingly limited for someone like me but it is what I use on all my family members computers because it needs basically no user interaction to run and provide quite good ...


4

I use Microsoft Security Essentials. It's free, comes from the maker of the operating system (who ostensibly knows more about the OS than anyone else), integrates nicely, and doesn't bug me too much. Note that as @mirabilos mentions, Microsoft Security Essentials is only free if it is for personal use or less than 10 seats within a company. Microsoft has a ...


4

The best and cheap option available is to use Windows Essential suite (Provided all your machines are running Windows 7+ OSes). Windows Essentials uses less processing power, works in tally with the genuine OS,checks for updates and supports runtime scan and doesn't costs you a penny.


4

According to Symantec, they have a product called Norton Power Eraser (NPE) that should be able to remove the Cryptolocker virus/trojan. For information provided by Symantec, see this page. At the time of this writing, it was last updated on August 6, 2015, 3:39:36 PM. You can download the latest version of this program from this link. Norton™ Power Eraser ...


4

This answer will change as my research and testing continues. As of August 12, 2017, I am accepting this as my answer, but I am going to continue to expand on this list as I find new potential alternatives. I still prefer Avast due to its memory footprint and cost effectiveness, but YMMV. Just to make a note, I did some research based on the amavisd-...


3

This is just for general use. I would recommend MalwareBytes Anti-Virus. It's a powerful tool. It has one of the most up-to-date databases in whole spectrum of malware tools. It uninstalls almost with no leftover which is real handy. The paid version has real-time scanning, but it's not meant to be used in a way where you need it. Its a real gem as it comes ...


3

When someone doesn't like ClamWin Portable, I recommend Comodo Cleaning Essentials It's a bit simpler and less feature-rich than Clamwin, but its scanning is arguably superior. A few bulletpoints... It's from a well-reviewed vendor that's been around for a long time. It can be installed on a USB drive and run standalone. It has frequent updates to its ...


3

I like Avast!, now "Avast! 2014". The basic AntiVirus is free with additional features like the "SafeZone" available in a paid-for "Pro" version. I used to used AVG Anti-Virus, as mentioned in another answer, but I had one or two conflicts with other software (although that was a couple of years ago now). I installed Avast! through a friends recommendation ...


3

There are a few options out there for free antivirus software. What I would recommend is AVG. The free version of AVG can do all of the following: Blocks viruses, spyware, & other malware Scans web, Twitter, & Facebook links Securely deletes files to prevent snooping Full System scan Quick System scan Scheduled Scans RootKit Scans As a piece of ...


3

ClamAV is Open Source, and I know that researchers and individuals scrutinize its source code. I don't think any organization is tasked with auditing it on a regular basis, though.


3

Though I'm not aware of any generic solution working on all mentioned systems, there are several of them for Android. Google kicked most of them off the Playstore, but most of them can still be found on F-Droid, where they can be downloaded via browser directly from the website, or using their own Android app (similar to the Google Play Store app). AdAway ...


3

I would believe you look no further than Hiren Boot CD. The website will inform you of all the tools you can use, which are compressed within a zip file, extracted to the PC at TEMP when used. The tools also have a virtual window's tool, password remover, hardware testing etc. and are all in about a 1.92GB ISO file (downloaded from the site or via P2P ...


3

first: basically... running continuously a antivirus software on a usual linux-desktop is more a service to the windows-users you are interacting with, than something else. you may have a look at this: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Antivirus second: my personal experience... it is nearly 10 years ago, i started using linux... for the first year as ...


3

For a home user I would simply recommend you to use the in built Windows Defender. The reason being it just comes along with a simply built user interface, without extra bunch of bloatware, such as cleaner, driver updater etc that most modern free antiviruses bring. One great feature is also the ability to get offline updates. Besides, this makes it light ...


2

In my personal experience with Windows, AVG is the best option in my opinion (although I personally haven't tested the Mac version). Never had any troubles with it and it has protected me from a few trojans. Features: Totally free for both Windows and Mac (although you can buy additional security options only in the Windows edition) Can't say about the Mac ...


2

On Windows, there is PeerBlock. It is freeware. I don't know if it interacts with the hosts file, but it blocks adware and spyware hostnames and IPs: It automatically updates its blocklists: You can edit blocklists and download new ones from iblocklist.com


2

You can try Panda Cloud Antivirus. I have it installed on my parents' computer, and they never notice it's there. Features: Gratis Requires no attention at all after the initial install No pop-up ads. Although some features require the pro version, you won't be notified unless you actively click them No pop-up success reports. You can view them when you ...


2

you can try Antivirus Live CD, a Linux distribution target to run ClamAV from the bootable CD. You can get it on SourceForge : http://sourceforge.net/projects/antiviruslivecd/


2

Using my app search by permission, I only found two candidates being left when applying all your must-have conditions: Ad Clean & Antivirus Security Antivirus Free-Mobile Security Both are fairly well rated. Applying your nice-to-have criteria only leaves the first candidate then (no GET_ACCOUNTS and READ_PHONE_STATE). As I'm not using any such app (I ...


2

Here is a list of applications which I can recommend by personal experience and by postings from other people around here. You need to know, sadly not everything is open source, but it doesn't necessarily destroy it's security. Open Source: VirtualBox - It's open source and you can run virtual machines with it. Good use cases are for example testing ...


2

This page lists 13 active alternatives to Deep Freeze on Windows. With Shadow Defender, you have the flexibility to specify which files and folders are permanently saved to the real environment. This ensures important files and folders are kept after a reboot. Note that with physical access, only full disk encryption can keep your files safe. ...


2

ClamAV would probably do the trick for you. I haven't personally used it for Linux, but it's worked well for me on Windows. It's available for Linux and many others - you can even build from source if you like. It's also available as a package on many distributions. It does have command line control, so scripting should be no problem. I can't really ...


2

Glad to hear from a Linux guy. Many people would prefer just using the Windows defender that comes by default along with Malwarebytes Anti-malware as a second layer of defense. I recommend you too this if you have a laptop with good specs (I hadn't searched about your laptop), cause Defender reportedly has a considerable impact on the performance (like high ...


2

It's difficult to find a "free" Anti-Malware solution. I would recommend Sophos Free Antivirus. Here are the 3 reasons why: It's actually free no nagging. You decide how much security and resources you want to use. Sophos has good reviews; check them out: https://www.av-test.org/en/antivirus/mobile-devices/android/january-2017/sophos-mobile-...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible