Search type Search syntax
Tags [tag]
Exact "words here"
Author user:1234
user:me (yours)
Score score:3 (3+)
score:0 (none)
Answers answers:3 (3+)
answers:0 (none)
isaccepted:yes
hasaccepted:no
inquestion:1234
Views views:250
Sections title:apples
body:"apples oranges"
URL url:"*.example.com"
Favorites infavorites:mine
infavorites:1234
Status closed:yes
duplicate:no
migrated:no
wiki:no
Types is:question
is:answer
Exclude -[tag]
-apples
For more details on advanced search visit our help page
Results tagged with Search options answers only user 13480

Software that manipulates PDF (Portable Document Format) files: converting to or from PDF, printing, editing, assembling or splitting, …

0
votes
To achieve this in a reliable way, you can use a two step process: Convert the text characters in the PDF to a series of small vector outlines. This can be done by Ghostscript (version 9.15 or … later) with the parameter -dNoOutputFonts: gswin64c.exe -o outlines.pdf \ -dNoOutputFonts \ -sDEVICE=pdfwrite \ input.pdf Convert the newly created PDF to EPS …
answered Apr 4 '15 by Kurt Pfeifle
2
votes
bit slow to report final results; that is because it needs to virtually render each page in order to compute the ink coverage): Example command: $> gs -o - -sDEVICE=inkcov sample2.pdf Processing … , when rendered, does not use any ink, hence it is "blank". This does not mean that this page is really empty, when looked at in a PDF viewer. To list but only two examples: It could use white text on …
answered Jul 8 '15 by Kurt Pfeifle
1
vote
While @FranckDernoncourt's answer about ImageMagick is correct, there is an even more easy-to-use command: convert \ input.pdf \ -append \ output.png Use +append for horizontal (ins …
answered Apr 4 '15 by Kurt Pfeifle
2
votes
Recent versions of Ghostscript have a new device available, inkcov, which can count the number of pixels for each of the color channels in CMYK space. (If the PDF uses RGB, the reported color values …
answered Jul 6 '15 by Kurt Pfeifle
5
votes
There is currently no (Free) PDF viewer for Ubuntu which is able to display these animations. You'll have to install Adobe Reader for Linux (the latest version available is 9, no more officially … supported, neither by Adobe nor by Ubuntu). Neither PDF.js (Firefox's built-in PDF renderer) or PDFium (Chrome's built-in PDF renderer), nor MuPDF, XPDF, Evince, Okular or Zathura support these …
answered Jul 6 '15 by Kurt Pfeifle
5
votes
I'm not sure what you mean exactly with "compression optimizer": You may want to leave every single PDF object that may be relevant to the rendered pages "as is", and just impose the highest … listed in "1.", some other changes to the PDF file: Downsampling of image resolution. Subsetting fonts which are fully embedded. Unembedding fully embedded fonts if they belong to the Base 14 PDF
answered Apr 3 '15 by Kurt Pfeifle
16
votes
commands to try: compare a.pdf[3] b.pdf[5] delta1.pdf compare -density 300 a.pdf[3] b.pdf[5] delta2.pdf compare a.pdf[3] b.pdf[5] -compose src … delta3.pdf compare a.pdf[3] b.pdf[5] -fuzz 5% delta4.pdf (ImageMagick's frame/page counting is zero-based; so "[3]" means "page 4"...) This will create "delta" documents, where each …
answered Apr 4 '15 by Kurt Pfeifle
7
votes
as the flavors of GitHub and PHP plus several special extensions). Other input formats are: HTML, rST, Textile, DocBook XML, MediaWiki. As output formats it supports: ConTeXt, LaTeX, PDF and Beamer … PDF (albeit requiring LaTeX in the background), MediaWiki, DOCX, DocBook, rST, Textile, ASCIIDoc, texinfo, org (Emacs Org-mode), S5 (HTML slides), Slidy (HTML slides), Slideous (HTML slides …
answered Apr 18 '15 by Kurt Pfeifle
5
votes
Extracting Tables from PDF Your requirement to extract tables from PDFs is not easy to meet. Standard PDFs do not provide any hints about the semantics of what they draw on a page: the only … character within an otherwise empty area is not easy to recognize programmatically by parsing the PDF source code. For a background about why the PDF file format should never, ever be thought of as …
answered Apr 15 '15 by Kurt Pfeifle
2
votes
commercial license. There are pre-compiled binaries for Windows as well as Linux available (plus a source code license in order to self-compile it on other platforms, like Mac OS X). To convert an XPS file to a PDF, use this command: gxps -o out.pdf \ -sDEVICE=pdfwrite \ input.xps …
answered Apr 3 '15 by Kurt Pfeifle
2
votes
few new and additional features (it can do more than just PDF->HTML conversion): $ mudraw Usage: mudraw [options] file [pages] -p - password -o - output file name (%d for page number … ) -F - output format (default inferred from output file name) raster: png, tga, pnm, pam, pbm, pwg, pcl vector: svg, pdf, trace text: txt, html, stext -s - show extra …
answered May 17 '15 by Kurt Pfeifle
1
vote
HTMLDOC can do this. It is Free Software. PrinceXML can also do it. PrinceXML is very powerful, supporting most of the CSS2 standard for styling the PDF output. It isn't Open Source, but gratis to … can also consume HTML. For PDF output, it requires a working LaTeX installation. In this case its version 1.13.2 can create a PDF output with this command: pandoc -f html \ -V …
answered Apr 4 '15 by Kurt Pfeifle
2
votes
really strong when it comes to CSS support, and it does only HTML/XML/CSS conversion to PDF (without requiring any other external libraries). Pandoc requires LaTeX to create PDFs, but Pandoc also can … PrinceXML and was disappointed. This could probably be debugged if the input file(s) were available somehow in order to reproduce it. Pandoc he has also tried... yes, on Windows it requires an additional MikTeX installation so it can convert HTML to PDF. …
answered Apr 4 '15 by Kurt Pfeifle
5
votes
LibreOffice has been mentioned already... But Scribus is a lesser known software (a "Page Layouts Creating Program") which is able to output high-quality PDF files, not matched in feature-richness … by any other Open Source application: It can create PDF/X, PDF/A, layers, fillable forms and much more. Details about PDF forms creation here: Your first PDF form with Scribus …
answered Apr 4 '15 by Kurt Pfeifle