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I am looking for Windows or Linux software to record a radio stream on a schedule. For example, start recoring a radio stream every day at 8:00AM for 4 hours.

Currently I am using AIMP which offers recording feature but not scheduling.

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There are two issues really:

  1. How to record an audio stream, (radio station), from the command line or similar
  2. How to schedule its execution

Command Line Record

You can use (on both platforms) Video LAN VLC (Free & Open Source) from the command line or shell. There are lots of command line options but amongst them are options to stream from a URL,

-I dummy
VLC should run with no GUI, typing error messages and asking for input in the command line window. This is better for scripting and for faster completion

--run-time=<float [-340282346638528859811704183484516925440.000000 .. 340282346638528859811704183484516925440.000000]> 
                             Run time
      The stream will run this duration (in seconds).

There is a special target that should come after the URL for the radio station

vlc://quit

This will case VLC to end after the stream run duration. There are a lot of options for how to control the audio save format, etc., this page is quite helpful as is the command line help.

Once you have worked out (and tested) your command line you need to save it as a batch file .bat on Windows or a bash script on Linux (or other shell script):

Schedule For A Given Time

This differs between Windows and Linux:

In both cases you will need to ensure that the script is accessible when you are not logged on, has access to VLC, has write permissions in the destination directory and in Linux is executable.

Note: Personally I would suggest ensuring that the destination device is not your Operating System device just in case you don't get around to listening to & deleting your recordings for a few weeks.

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