3

I am looking for a browser-based solution to make end-to-end encrypted calls without having to register (as in verify an email, sms, oauth etc.).

From what I understand this could be accomplished using WebRTC and thus wouldn't even really require a server because everything could happen peer-to-peer.

But even though there appear to be libraries which should make it relatively straight forward to write something like this, I couldn't actually find anything.

2
  • ExpressVPN available on Firefox works well. Jan 23 '20 at 20:20
  • @RobertAllebach This has nothing to do with my question. Besides that it's a common misconception that a VPN would encrypt your traffic. In reality you're adding two parties (the VPN provider and the ISP of that VPN provider) who can read your traffic and only excluding your own ISP from doing it.
    – Forivin
    Jan 24 '20 at 8:38
1

With https://whereby.com/ you can provide video meetings in the browser. Your attendees just need to visit your custom link to whereby.

You can also share your screen and for small teams (up to 4 attendees) it is gratis.

This is not a code library but a software recommendation. Anyway, i hope this helps.

1
  • 1
    To add to your answer, according to their privacy policy, using the free version of their service audio/video is end-to-end encrypted and unless the user is behind a firewall/NAT, it is also transmitted peer-to-peer: whereby.com/information/tos/privacy-policy (The paid version however will not necessarily do that.) The service does, however, require signing up for an account (at least for the person who creates the "room").
    – Forivin
    Jan 20 '20 at 8:59
1

WebRTC is, by design, necessarily end-to-end encrypted. And there are dozens of free WebRTC-powered video chat websites available, many for free.

From what I understand this could be accomplished using WebRTC and thus wouldn't even really require a server because everything could happen peer-to-peer.

It's actually not that simple. If the users are behind a NAT or you want it to scale beyond ~4 people, then you'll need to throw up some STUN or SFU or similar servers.

End-to-end encryption

This gets tricky if the server you use terminates the WebRTC on their own server (eg using a Multipoint Conferencing Unit (MCU) or Selective Forwarding Unit (SFU)), which it may do for scalability (mesh WebRTC connections tend to break down with more than ~4 people without some MCU or SFU)

Jitsi

Probably the most popular web-based WebRTC service that provides e2ee that scales is Jitsi. You can use their free service or host your own jitsi meet instance (it's free software):

You can also build your own service using the jitsi video bridge and their other components.

Janus

You may also want to look into Janus, which has a less mature (UX) set of WebRTC services, but might be more useful if you actually want to build your own service that just uses its libraries

See also

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.