0

I am looking for some (free or paid) softwares, APIs or programming libraries (any programming language) for splitting OGG and M4A audio files without transcoding.

By splitting I mean: transforming a 10 minutes audio file of 10 min and split it into two files, one with 4 min and other with 6 min.

1

I managed to split the audio using ffmpeg for Windows https://ffmpeg.zeranoe.com/builds/

  1. Unzipped the program to a desired location.
  2. Opened cmd in Windows.
  3. Navigated to to the ffmpeg-(version-code-here)/bin/ folder
  4. Ran the command

    ffmpeg.exe -ss 30 -i "D:\Songs\my-audio.m4a" -c copy -t 60 "D:\Songs\my-audio-splitted.m4a"

This command is splitting the audio file after -i parameter from second 30 to second 90 (30 + 60) and saving it at "D:\Songs\my-audio-splitted.m4a"

  • -ss 30 means the split will begin at the 30th second of the audio file

  • -t 60 means the split will end counting 60 seconds from the informed start, so the split will end at the 90th second

If -ss is not informed, the split will assume the start is at 0 second

If -t is not informed, the split will assume the end is the end of the audio

I am not sure what ffmpeg is doing (if its transcoding or not), but it is a really fast processing, so I am assuming it is doing what I want.

Credits for @StarGeek at the comment section.

| improve this answer | |
  • Using the copy option, it shouldn't be doing any transcoding, just a straight stream copy. I believe that if it were a video file, it would have to be cut on a key frame, but I'm not sure about the case with a .m4a file. – StarGeek Feb 6 '19 at 5:33
  • That's a good question. Is there such thing as a key frame in audio files? Probably yes. – Tiago Stapenhorst Martins Feb 6 '19 at 16:41

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.