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I'm trying some creative writing, and I rewrite a lot of part of the text, and I want to be able to see previous versions of the same part of the text, and maybe merge them. Doing this by copy pasting somewhere and go back to it again seems very ineffective to me. Is there any automated solution for this?

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    Git? .......... – Arkadiusz Drabczyk Dec 30 '18 at 14:22
  • Git is not automatic, you have to commit the changes manually. – Ádám Bakai Dec 30 '18 at 18:50
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    How automatic - do you want to commit each sentence? Each character? Make a new commit every x seconds? – Arkadiusz Drabczyk Dec 30 '18 at 20:13
  • medium.com/@jjmerelo/… is worth a read. – Steve Barnes Dec 30 '18 at 20:23
  • I'm thinking about some kind of logic that creates chunks of text. If you see a person write text, you can see that he changes parts, add text, delete parts. This "atomic" actions should be the commits. I'm not sure how this would work, but I'm sure it's possible. – Ádám Bakai Dec 30 '18 at 23:07
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  1. EditPlus with installed|configured TortoiseSVN|TortoiseGit
  2. Any text editor with VCS-support
  3. Just good GUI for version control system of your choice and your editor
  • I want something more automatic, than using just a conventional vcs and text editor with conentional vcs support, and deciding when to commit, and commit then. I want some mechanism that saves all the information I typed automatically. And then visualize them in a way that is easy to use again. – Ádám Bakai Dec 30 '18 at 20:12
  • @ÁdámBakai - experience from a lot of writers tells us: "autocommits on save" is a road to hell of overflooded useless history – Lazy Badger Dec 31 '18 at 8:34
  • @ÁdámBakai But you can try it: free EasySVN (old, unsupported Assembla tool) + Assembla account (4 some bucks per month): easysvn.jaleco.com + assembla.com/home – Lazy Badger Dec 31 '18 at 8:43
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Google Docs offers automatic versioning, though it is cloud-based (unlimited storage) and requires an account.

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Try visual studio code, along with GIT. It does all you need.

If you need a futher view into the history of the text then TortoiseGit is a good addition.

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