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I am looking an easy 3rd party solution recommendation for server backups in the cloud. I have a server that produces 2 MB of data every day. I would like those to be backed up in the cloud somehow, using a service similar to Dropbox or Box.

Neither Dropbox nor Box can be ran on a server as a service (they run in the logged in user context):

This is for a pet project, so I am cost-aware.

Any suggestions?

Expanding on the "backup to the cloud somehow". An ideal solution:

  • Runs as a Linux service (daemon / bg job) that monitors files in a specific directory. I will have a cron job that adds files into the monitored folder periodically
  • Has a Web App / Web API where I can easily check that the files are being uploaded daily and they are easy to download
  • Is free up to some limit (100MB is more than enough)
  • Is not self hosted. I want to avoid having to make a backup of the backup.
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    You're asking for something to self-host? What OS is running on the receiving end (if Linux, you could simply use ssh to copy files over, even SSHFS to mount remote storage on the local machine). Same way, something offering storage via WebDAV (e.g. Nextcloud) could work. SeaFile might be worth a look as well. All of those would work to have data "backed up in the cloud somehow", all of them are free. If you'd give more details on the "somehow", that would make matching recommendations easier ;) – Izzy Aug 4 '18 at 19:44
  • Given the small size of my files, I would prefer a cloud solution rather than self-hosted. My machine is running RHEL6. – Andrei Cioara Aug 4 '18 at 20:11
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    @Izzy I added few more details to my questions. – Andrei Cioara Aug 4 '18 at 20:13
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    Thanks! There are several Nextcloud hosters giving at least 1G storage for free, just check this Nextcloud page. The WebDAV copy from my previous comment would then apply for the backup process, and the corresponding website or the Android app for checking what got there. Would that fit your needs, so I should make this an answer? – Izzy Aug 4 '18 at 21:29
  • While the answer points me in the correct direction, it is too vague. Could not find any free service unfortunately. – Andrei Cioara Aug 7 '18 at 19:52
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You can use Nextcloud for this. There are providers offering a few GB for free, like the Germany-based Webo or Swiss-based Wölkli, both offering 3GB storage in their free plans.

Nextcloud file storage can be mounted locally using WebDAV, which is easily done on a Linux machine, no additional software needed, only a single line added to /etc/fstab:

https://<Nextcloud-Server>/remote.php/dav/files/<user>/ /home/<user>/dav davfs user,rw,noauto,_netdev 0 0

(of course you can use a divverent mount point, so this is just an example line. Important parameters are user (so you can mount it without root), rw for read and write access, _netdev telling the system this cannot be mounted before the network is up).

That done, your backups are placed on the server by simply copying it to the locally mounted Nextcloud folder. Let's see how it matches your requirements altogether:

  • Runs as a Linux service (daemon / bg job) that monitors files in a specific directory. I will have a cron job that adds files into the monitored folder periodically: Not exactly (no Linux service), but the goal is still reached: all files placed there end up on the server.
  • Has a Web App / Web API where I can easily check that the files are being uploaded daily and they are easy to download: Yes, you can check that via your browser on any device supporting a browser (see screenshot below). If it were an Android device, you could even use their app for it (but then, this would also take care for/mirror the files).
  • Is free up to some limit (100MB is more than enough): You'll get 3GB with the services mentioned. So it's 30 times more than enough :)
  • Is not self hosted. I want to avoid having to make a backup of the backup.: You can self-host it (and then available storage is up to you). But as you do not wish to, see above – there are services available from multiple places. Backup of the backup included.

Nextcloud Files
Nextcloud Files in a web browser. Source: Nextcloud. As you see, you can even comment on files.

I'm using Nextcloud myself (self-hosted) and can say it works relyable and IMHO perfectly fits your use-case. Using the hosted variant you'd even not have to care for updates, so it should be a hassle-free experience. Once set up, it simply works.

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    Brilliant writeup. Thank you! – Andrei Cioara Aug 10 '18 at 16:43
  • Glad we finally found a solution for you – enjoy :) – Izzy Aug 10 '18 at 17:16

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