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I am looking for an application which I can use to self test and improve my chord knowledge.

Yousician has a feature which does this, but it is too simple (the highest level available just tests maj7 chords) and it is also a bit generous with letting you get away with imperfect efforts (if it asks you to play an E5 it doesn't really care if you throw in a G# as well).

Does anyone have any tips?

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    You should be more specific in what you expect the software to do. It sounds like you want it to analyze live audio and detect if you played the right chord? I'm not aware of such an app but my point is just that you should make it clear what you are expecting. – user37496 Feb 12 '18 at 0:09
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    That said I don't know that you need any high-tech solution. Flash cards—or flash card apps—are great for randomization of things like this. Use them to quiz you on a random root and/or chord type. Also play through the circle of 4ths both chromatically and diatonically, and play through progressions in as many different ways as you can. This can have the advantage of practicing not just the shapes but also voice-leading between them. – user37496 Feb 12 '18 at 0:19
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Ear Training Practice at tonedear.com has several online exercises:

Intervals: In this exercise, you will hear two notes in sequence. Your goal is to identify the interval between the two notes.<br />
Chords: In this exercise, you will hear a chord. Your goal is to identify the type of chord that you heard.<br />
Scales: In this exercise, you will hear a scale. Your goal is to identify the name of the scale that you heard.<br />
Chord Progressions: In this exercise, you will hear a chord progression. Your goal is to identify each chord that you heard.<br />
Perfect Pitch: In this exercise, you will hear a single note. Your goal is to identify the name of the note.<br />
Scale Degrees (functional): In this exercise, you will hear a short chord progression followed by a single note. You must identify the scale degree of that note relative to the key established by the chord progression. This is also known as "functional ear training".<br />
Intervals in Context (functional): This exercise combines the "Intervals" and "Scale Degrees" exercises. In this exercise, you will hear a short chord progression followed by two notes. You must identify the major scale degrees of the two notes relative to the key established by the chord progression as well as the interval between the two notes.<br />
Melodic Dictation: In this exercise, you will hear a short chord progression followed by a short melody. You must identify the major scale degree of each note in the melody.
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[Is this for Guitar? You mentioned E5.]

If you can find it, I would highly recommend "GuitarPro". I personally have version 5 so cannot speak to later editions, but this has the functionality that you speak of to my knowledge.

The interface will allow you to select a chord and can:

  1. Show you alternative ways to play the chord anywhere on the neck
  2. You can dynamically add and remove notes to the original chord and the name will change accordingly as well as showing you alternates

You can also change the tunings which will again modify the above i.e. where will you now need to place your fingers if you use C-standard instead of E-standard tuning.

I use it to help me find chords for tunings like Cadd9 - you just say I want an EMaj chord and it will show you how to play it saving you time in working it out yourself.

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