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I have all my code files on remote linux machine. I code on windows, and so I need to mount the remote machine source folder on my windows box.

I use SFTP net drive to do this https://www.eldos.com/sftp-net-drive/

This mounts my remote source code as a folder on my windows machine, and then I use sublime text code editor to edit files and save them as if I'm doing it locally.

Are there any other alternatives for doing the same? what do you guys use?

Software Requirements:

  • Mounts linux directory on to the windows machine.
  • Must run on : windows
  • Both the machines are on the same subnet.
  • Text editors running on windows should be able to read/write and save changes easily without having to upload them everytime
  • Adding onto previous point, mounted directory should work like it's a native folder on windows.
  • 1
    Though your description holds several criteria required to recommend matching software, it suffers some formatting issues to make them clearly stand out. Please take a look at What is required for a question to contain "enough information"? Then please edit your question and see if you can incorporate some of these improvements. This will significantly improve your chances of good answers! – Izzy May 13 '14 at 14:18
  • While your edit doesn't really add anything new, I assume you're only looking to replace the "mount part"? If so, are the machines both on the same subnet? Are they separated by any kind of firewall? Is there a port limitation, or a protocol limitation involved? Assuming no limitations or firewall, and both machines in the same subnet, you could e.g. use Samba on the Linux machine, to provide the "drive" as "Windows share". – Izzy May 13 '14 at 16:34
  • Yes both the machines are on the same subnet, I can ssh normally into it, also as I said I'm already using a product called SFTP net drive to do this. – sublime May 13 '14 at 17:24
  • What's wrong with Samba? – Ira Baxter May 24 '14 at 8:28
  • I don't know why this is closed, but In case if someone is still looking for this I've had a pretty good luck with sshfs. Give it a try :) – sublime Aug 5 '16 at 0:01
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To mount a SFTP as a drive, you can use Swish:

  • free
  • Windows 98/2000/XP/Vista/7

enter image description here

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As you only wish to replace your network mount, and both machines are part of the same subnet, you might wish to take a look at Samba. This server software is part of most Linux distributions repositories, and thus easy to install (if it's not already pre-installed). Configuration shouldn't be that difficult either: usually, you just have to uncomment (and adjust) a few lines of the sample configuration. That will make the local resources on the Linux machine (such as directories or printers) available as "Windows Shares", which can be discovered with ease from your Windows machine. No additional software required on the Windows end, no additional costs involved:

  • Mounts linux directory on to the windows machine: Yes.
  • Must run on Windows: Natively.
  • Text editors running on windows should be able to read/write and save changes easily without having to upload them everytime: Definitely.
  • Adding onto previous point, mounted directory should work like it's a native folder on windows: Yes; you can assign a share a drive letter even.
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You can use Eclipse with the Remote System Explorer End-User Runtime Eclipse plugin:

  • free and open-source
  • support Windows, Linux and Mac
  • adds SFTP support and allow using private keys:

You just need to add your private key in the following configuration window (and in the login window you can leave the password blank or put any random password as the private key will be used to connect anyway):

enter image description here

  • whenever the user save a file it would get uploaded on the server:

enter image description here

It's great to use along with SuperPuTTY:

enter image description here

  • I do not use eclipse, I use a text editor to code. – sublime May 13 '14 at 17:30

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