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I am looking for a software capable to share sound output devices on an ipv4 network.

Is it somehow possible?

  • Ideally, I would like to hear the sound of a Windows machine on a Linux box. But the other direction is also ok.
  • I need sound output, but if I can also share input devices, it is better.
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    So you wish to hear a music played on a windows machine on both a windows machine and a Linux machine? – Aswin P J May 22 '16 at 8:55
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    @AswinPJ Both cases are okay, but the Windows -> Linux direction is better. – peterh May 22 '16 at 17:03
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This is one way that you may be able to accomplish what you want, it requires two different pieces of software. This method is for sending sound from your Windows PC to Linux. First, you need software called "Stream What You Hear" installed on your Windows PC. This will allow you to stream the sound from your Windows PC to a UPnP/DLNA device. You will then install UPNP / DLNA client on Linux. I recommend using software called VLC. To use VLC start the Playlist (View -> Playlist; Ctrl + L) and then select Local Network -> Universal Plug 'n' Play - Source.

Stream What You Hear (free)

Stream What You Hear (SWYH) is a Windows application to broadcast the sound of your computer (ie: “what you hear”) on an UPnP/DLNA device such as TVs, amps, network receivers, game consoles, etc...

VLC (free)

VLC is a free and open source cross-platform multimedia player and framework that plays most multimedia files as well as DVDs, Audio CDs, VCDs, and various streaming protocols.

Edit 1

As Steve pointed out, it may also be possible to send streams as well as receiving them just using VLC.

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    Note that VLC is also available on Windows and can stream media content, (audio & video), including capture from things like microphone/webcam from both Windows and Linux as well as receiving such streams. – Steve Barnes May 23 '16 at 5:34

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