1

I've been looking for an app that can convert file path to text, I always see something like that on Github.

Example:

  1. bootstrap/css/bootstrap.css
  2. bootstrap.css.map
  3. bootstrap.min.css
  4. etc.

then convert it to something like this

bootstrap/
├── css/
│   ├── bootstrap.css
│   ├── bootstrap.css.map
│   ├── bootstrap.min.css
│   ├── bootstrap.min.css.map
│   ├── bootstrap-theme.css
│   ├── bootstrap-theme.css.map
│   ├── bootstrap-theme.min.css
│   └── bootstrap-theme.min.css.map
├── js/
│   ├── bootstrap.js
│   └── bootstrap.min.js
└── fonts/
    ├── glyphicons-halflings-regular.eot
    ├── glyphicons-halflings-regular.svg
    ├── glyphicons-halflings-regular.ttf
    ├── glyphicons-halflings-regular.woff
    └── glyphicons-halflings-regular.woff2

It's because I wanted to stick to my own folder format, I've created this so I can easily see the birds eye view of it, problem is it consumes almost an hour of my time.

Cary/
└── Cary Personal Website/
    ├── Project Backup
    │     ├── 16-02-14
    │     │    ├── Changes.txt
    │     │    ├── bootstrap.min.css
    │     │    ├── bootstrap.min.css.map
    │     │    ├── bootstrap-theme.css
    │     │    ├── bootstrap-theme.css
    │     │    └── bootstrap-theme.css.map
    │     └── 16-02-15 
    │          ├── Changes.txt
    │          ├── bootstrap.min.css
    │          ├── bootstrap.min.css.map
    │          ├── bootstrap-theme.css
    │          └── bootstrap-theme.css.map
    ├── Database Backup
    │     ├── 16-02-14
    │     │    ├── Changes.txt
    │     │    └── cary_db.sql
    │     └── 16-02-15 
    │          ├── Changes.txt
    │          └── cary_db.sql
    └── cary_personal_web 
               ├── Changes.txt
               ├── bootstrap.min.css
               ├── bootstrap.min.css.map
               ├── bootstrap-theme.css
               └── bootstrap-theme.css.map

migrated from webapps.stackexchange.com Feb 16 '16 at 0:39

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2

Windows has the built-in command tree. It does not exactly look like your output, but the idea is the same.

C:\Users\thomas.weller\example>echo x > file1

C:\Users\thomas.weller\example>echo y > file2

C:\Users\thomas.weller\example>mkdir subdir

C:\Users\thomas.weller\example>echo z > subdir\file3.txt

C:\Users\thomas.weller\example>tree /F
Folder PATH listing for volume Windows
Volume serial number is 029F-858B
C:.
│   file1
│   file2
│
└───subdir
        file3.txt
  • Great answer! +1 I didn't know that. – Cary Bondoc Feb 16 '16 at 8:12
  • 1
    Btw: not only Windows. Linux has it, too, and most likely MacOS as well :) – Izzy Feb 16 '16 at 8:15

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